View Full Version : Adhd Symptoms in Persons With Celiac


Gadgetgirl
04-20-08, 01:42 AM
I stumbled across this article, and I'm wheat intollerant... just wanted to know what you all think about it?


Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 10, No. 2, 200-204 (2006)
DOI: 10.1177/1087054706292109
2006 SAGE Publications

A Preliminary Investigation of ADHD Symptoms in Persons With Celiac Disease

</NOBR><NOBR>Helmut Niederhofer</NOBR>

Regional Hospital of Bolzano, Italy, helmutniederhofer@yahoo.de<SCRIPT type=text/javascript><!-- var u = "helmutniederhofer", d = "yahoo.de"; document.getElementById("em0").innerHTML = '<a href="mailto:' + u + '@' + d + '">' + u + '@' + d + '<\/a>'//-->***********
</NOBR><NOBR>Klaus Pittschieler</NOBR>
Regional Hospital of Bolzano, Italy
Objective: Several studies report a possible association of<SUP> </SUP>celiac disease (CD) with psychiatric and psychological disturbances,<SUP> </SUP>such as ADHD.<SUP> </SUP>
Method: The authors assess 132 participants from 3 to 57 years<SUP> </SUP>of age (M = 19.3 years) affected by CD for the possibility of<SUP> </SUP>an associated ADHD-like symptomatology, using the Conner Scale<SUP> </SUP>Hypescheme, a behavioral scale similar to the Conners Rating<SUP> </SUP>Scales, before their gluten-free diet was started and 6 months<SUP> </SUP>later.<SUP> </SUP>
Results: The overall score improves significantly as well as<SUP> </SUP>most of the ADHD-like symptomatology specific features (Bonferroni-corrected,<SUP> </SUP>paired-sample t tests).<SUP> </SUP>
Conclusion: The data indicate that ADHD-like symptomatology<SUP> </SUP>is markedly overrepresented among untreated CD patients and<SUP> </SUP>that a gluten-free diet may improve symptoms significantly within<SUP> </SUP>a short period of time. The results of this study also suggest<SUP> </SUP>that CD should be included in the list of diseases associated<SUP> </SUP>with ADHD-like symptomatology.<SUP> </SUP>
Key Words: ADHD celiac disease

kilted_scotsman
04-20-08, 05:56 AM
Very interesting indeed. though I am not Coeliac my dad is. We did notice an improvement in his mental state once he was diagnosed which we put down to not being so anxious about what his guts were doing.

He is now diagnosed with Alzheimers making it impossible to judge whether the switch to a gluten free diet helped his ADD (undiagnosed) or helped his incipient Alzheimers by reducing stress levels.

kilt

Driver
04-20-08, 08:48 AM
I'm not surprised that things improved. Being gluten-intolerant myself, I found I had way more energy and no more brain fogging once I went gluten free (not to mention way less anxiety).

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 09:39 AM
I had seen the report, Gadtet. Geez, I posted the same question on Friday, and nobody responded. Well, sort of the same question, of any connection with any ADHDers or ASDers and GI troubles. So, here we go. I work in the medical field, and spoke with a mom who's 17-year old son was currently in the hospital for the umpteenth GI surgery, he is also ASD and ADHD. She is currently investigating the gluten thing with him. She has done some asking around, and his psych has noted to her that the BULK of her patients whom have ASD and/or ADHD have GI troubles. From what I am hearing, reading, and researching, a lot of it has to do with gluten. Interesting. My son, when we started challenging him with foods when he was a baby and we started wheat products on him, had severe celiac symptoms, so we totally removed them from his diet until it appears that now he can tolerate it, but my question is, can he really truly tolerate it? From what I have read about celiciacs, it can simmer quietly for a long time, doing damage, and then symptoms come into place. I really wish I could get this kid off of wheat and see how he does. Thanks for bringing the question up.

I appreciate your input Driver. At what age did you find out?

Jarleigannor
04-20-08, 11:57 AM
It's an interesting theory, but I'd prefer to see it studied in reverse, and not limited to Celiac.

Anecdote: I have a maternal aunt with Celiac (most non-adhd'er I know, lol). My mother and sister have gall bladder issues. The son of another maternal aunt (who is hypothyroid) shows many Celiac symptoms but refuses to be tested.

We're requesting celiac screening for my son at his next appointment. He has Asperger's and has had what would probably be considered a "wheat addiction" since he was... 4-ish. (I might be close to fitting that category, myself) We've been experimenting with gluten free foods for a long time to try and devise a menu that won't turn meals into a battle. Recently, he has begun to show signs of some GI issues, so we may be thrust into the battle anyway.

My gut <har har> instinct tells me that Celiac research can shed a lot of light on a wheat-neuro difference connection, but I also think that Celiac is probably a specification on a spectrum in the way Asperger's is a specification on the autism spectrum. Researching social skills can be informative for AS purposes, but how much of an impact does it have on non-communicative autistics? Researching Celiac in <enter neuro dx here> can be informative, but wouldn't investigating the wheat absorption of a wider variation that may not fit in the celiac dx provide greater data to analyze and increase the statistical significance?

I know research on a broader scale does exist. I just don't see how narrowing the parameters to CD and ADHD symptomology is all that useful when the initial theory seems to be so far from being considered proven. Isn't that like saying "We think we've found a combination of 5 drugs that can cure cancer, but we're going to devote a bunch of time and money toward studying the effects of *one of those drugs on esophageal cancer before we revert those efforts back to the broader theory that already has promising data for all cancer patients."

Then again, I was never one to pay attention in science classes and I have plenty of personal bias for wanting to look beyond CD and ADHD, so maybe I'm just taking it as personally as a hypothetical non-esophageal-cancer cancer patient would!

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 12:13 PM
I think your ideas are down the line, Jarlie. It is coming to the attention of health professionals that many ADHD and ASDs have GI syndroms as tagalongs, and they are in turn are looking at ways to support those issues; some are even going as far as to reach for a "cure" or a way to minimze the ADHD/ASD by actually treating and healing the GI syndromes. I am hopeful for a followup study on Neiderhofer's 2006 report. He is doing a lot of work in that area as his interest, though some of his work has been criticized.

I am in the process of gaining communication with a mom (a friend of my SIL) who has had remarkable sucess treating her son's autism with gluten-free diet. She says he is now mainstream, and not recognized as "autistic" at this time. I hope to have more information from her directly very soon.

Imnapl
04-20-08, 12:27 PM
Just a note: lots of students with ASD are mainstreamed in schools. I do know one teenager with Celiac who is diagnosed with ASD and has always done really well in school. His mom told me that if Celiac disease isn't diagnosed and treated, permanent damage occurs to the digestive system. I know an adult who was finally diagnosed with Celiac in her forties and apparently, this is becoming quite common. Too bad as the damage is done.

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 12:48 PM
Perhaps you missed the second part of my statement: "and not recognized as "autistic" at this time." That means that HE has changed from diet protocol, not simply that his educational environment has changed.

Jarleigannor, my son is also getting tested for Celiac sprue. In a couple of weeks he is having an upper endoscopy and biopsies will be taken. What is your son having done? The ped GI specialist got an attidude with me for asking about it. He said if he had a nickel for every time celiac was brought up in his office he'd be rich and retired. (Made me wonder if he didn't really want to be where he was though.) I'll post the results when they come in.

Imnapl
04-20-08, 12:58 PM
Perhaps you missed the second part of my statement: "and not recognized as "autistic" at this time." That means that HE has changed from diet protocol, not simply that his educational environment has changed.Do they know if this means he was misdiagnosed with Autism (easily done) and his symptoms were actually caused by Celiac disease?

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 01:15 PM
I hope to find out more when she contacts me. Either way, a child with a diagnosis of autism (misdiagnosis or not; and the cause is unknown anyways) that has been turned around is a happy thing for all concerned. Really, they would not know if it was a misdiagnosis or not unless they tried something and it worked.

How many individuals truly are wandering around with a misdiagnosis of something known to be incurable or unchangeable such as ADHD or ASD, when it is actually a different or separate condition that CAN be rehabilitated????

meadd823
04-20-08, 01:39 PM
t's an interesting theory, but I'd prefer to see it studied in reverse, and not limited to Celiac.

This is close but personally I would like to approach it from the other end. . . I know I am taking it personally - ADD the money making diagnosis of the 21 century - every one has a cure just send $19.95 + S&H and we will rush the cure straight to your door. . . cynical - yepp guilty as charged.. . . . . no denying that.

The most annoying thing about being ADD is the scams . . . other than that I find my allergy to Johnson grass to be way more annoying. . . but even in the winter time I am ADD, I can concentrate better because my eyes do not itch, and I can breathe but that is when my uneven sock elastic become noticeable. With ADDer it is always some thing interfering with the ability to direct our focus when it come to unstimulating boring crap {which btw is a HUGE clue} . . . even if that some thing is created by our own minds. . .

How about a list of all the things that look like ADD but aren't -why don't they do that - because it would be doghting at best if not impossible All sorts of things can interfere with ones selective attention span but when it is the elastic in your socks not being exactly even, the tag in your undergarment or the fifty thousand thoughts vying for your immediate attention no matter what you eat/drink or don't , how much you sleep or don't, no matter how many climates you move to or how many purifies you have in your home ya just might be ADD!

Other wise you have a food allergy. insomnia, or hay fever . . . which can all not only mimic ADD they all can co-occur with it also - can we begin to look for the cure to some one else condition now . . . .I am tired of wearing these hip boots they are distracting. . .


To that end . . . ..
I have no doubt if one has an intolerance to wheat and it is consumed it will effect the attention span - some thing about that distraught gut can be very distracting, making effectively directing your attention to necessary task extremely difficult if not impossible . Failure to absorb your food correctly due to inflammation can screw with planning and prioritizing not to mention motivation . . . not every thing that effects the selective attention span is ADD . . . just like not every thing that barks is a Dalmatian.

Jarleigannor
04-20-08, 01:43 PM
Jarleigannor, my son is also getting tested for Celiac sprue. In a couple of weeks he is having an upper endoscopy and biopsies will be taken. What is your son having done? The ped GI specialist got an attidude with me for asking about it. He said if he had a nickel for every time celiac was brought up in his office he'd be rich and retired. (Made me wonder if he didn't really want to be where he was though.) I'll post the results when they come in.

I'm planning to start with a full blood and allergy work up, and then make any further decisions based on those results.

An attitude from a pediatric GI isn't a good sign. It's probably reasonable for him to suggest holding off on invasive procedures before having simple screenings done, but blowing off the theory is a big red flag.

I'm obviously open to exploring the gluten/asd connection, or I'd have never bothered to look into gf/cf diets, but I'm highly skeptical about "cures".

My son has made *great progress in certain areas over the last 5 years or so. Some of the issues he had at the time of dx might be considered no longer present because we've worked so hard on behavior mods. I don't consider behavior mods to have cured those issues any more than I consider medication cures for adhd.
If a gf or gf/cf diet helps my child function as "normal", that will be great. But I don't believe there are any properly conducted studies that reflect 100% success in their subjects, so I can't consider it to be an actual *cure for ASDs. If the definition of cure worked like that, wouldn't cancer be considered cured by now, between removal procedures, radiation, and chemo?

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 01:50 PM
Meadd, diagnosing and treating celiacs is not a scam, I don't see anyone peddling a cure here for 19.95 + S+H. It's serious business, and, unfortunately, it brews unnoticed with no *noticeable* actual GI symptoms for literally years and years before symptoms develop, and as was said, then the damage is done. Just like colon cancer doesn't hurt a bit. There's more to celiacs than just pain, look it all up if you want to learn more about it. If one treats their celiac and their *other* symptoms are greatly relieved or alleiviated, so what? I'm sure that information and connection would be helpful to many individuals.

And, if you are tired of looking at other possiblities to help some with these debilitating conditions and comorbities, then simply just don't - - - look.

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 01:57 PM
Jarleigannor, kudos for the work you have done with your son. I agree, "cure" is a pretty stong word. Words like manage, releive, alleviate, are better words.

My son has already been through a year of all the preliminary screenigs (bloodwork, poop checks, CT scans, etc). We wouldn't want to undergo anesthesia lightly. I am a bit concerned about the docs attitude as well, but he emphasized that if there was "anything" there, he would find it. He's the only one our plan covers too! :-) Evidently, there are a lot of little ones out there whose mums are aware of the gluten factor in GI issues.

I don't think anyone here is saying one should LOOK for celiac sprue when they have LDs. I mean, if you have any GI trouble, celiac's, or any other food intolerance, you really should get it treated. If some of your other "issues" clear in the process, isn't that a good thing?

Jarleigannor
04-20-08, 02:04 PM
I have no doubt if one has an intolerance to wheat and it is consumed it will effect the attention span - some thing about that distraught gut can be very distracting, making effectively directing your attention to necessary task extremely difficult if not impossible . Failure to absorb your food correctly due to inflammation can screw with planning and prioritizing not to mention motivation . . . not every thing that effects the selective attention span is ADD . . . just like not every think that barks is a Dalmatian.

Right. But, if your goal is to breed Dalmations, it's a good idea to research the history of the parents you choose so you may wind up with the best Dalmations nature/genetics can guarantee, because you may not want to live with pups that inherit a long coat from some rendevous with a German Shephard a couple of generations ago.

If your goal is to simply have a litter of puppies that can survive, you might not be interested in breed details.

And I didn't intend to turn that into a pretty accurate analogy for the celebrate vs. cure debate, but it seems to have turned out that way. I happen to be a mutt lover, as well as being against actually "breeding out" or curing ASDs, ADHD, and the like. I prefer to look for adaptations and modifications.

I've learned as much as I can about my two mutts' lineage so that I can feed, exercise and train them the best way possible. I'm learning as much about ASDs and ADHD as I can so that my two-legged family can live as best as possible as well.

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 02:38 PM
For those who would like a brief rundown and general information on celiac's disease.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/celiac-disease/DS00319

Imnapl
04-20-08, 02:45 PM
I also found an interesting website:

http://www.celiac.com/

http://www.aafp.org/afp/980301ap/pruessn.html

Driver
04-20-08, 07:52 PM
Frazz: I went GF probably less than a year ago (late 20s). Pretty much had GI issues till then though (thought I had IBS for a while there).

As for the idea that a GF diet curing Autism (and the general theme of the idea): this has touched on a bugbear of mine. When ever I hear that people have had disease X or syndrome Y cured by a diet or something simple, I tend to think that perhaps the original diagnosis was completely wrong (as we all know, ADHD and Autism are disorders du jour nowadays).

I won't continue with that idea for risk of hijacking the thread.

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 08:58 PM
Thanks for that Driver! I have heard that it can take up to a year of avoiding gluten for the guts to heal to their fullest, so I hope you are soon on your way to feeling your best. The docs also gave my son the dx of IBS, but his symptoms do not quite present for "typical" IBS at all. It must be terribly difficult to manage celiacs, I hope you are finding it okay. There are a lot more products out there now then when he was a bity thing for gluten free.

As for the paper the OP presented, I don't think anyone was trying to insinuate that treating celiacs would cure ADHD or ASDs, just that the writer noted that a lot of the issues improved as the celiacs was treated. We are always going to be the root of who we are, but there may be at least a tad of hope for some where there was none before. ADHD and ASDs are hard to truly diagnose anyways, as there is no simple blood or other test to prove that that is the cause of one's issues. It is mostly by observation and meeting other stringent criteria that professionals try to tie in a name to those issues. I mean what is TRUE autism anyways as opposed to misdiagnosed autism??? Yeah, maybe that's another thread. LOL! :-)

Hopefully, celiacs won't be an issue for my son, though it would be nice to have something to work with, but on the outchance it is, I may be pickin your brain! You game?

canukie
04-20-08, 10:34 PM
A non-invasive test for gluten sensitivity can be done at enterolab.com--stool and saliva tests. Check it out. You may not want to have that small bowel biopsy if it can be avoided. Also at enterolab.com you'll see it explained why even a blood test may not be positive for celiac even if the person has celiac...the antibodies are in the bowel, not yet in the bloodstream.

FrazzleDazzle
04-20-08, 11:01 PM
Thanks Canukie! He's having the EGD done to look for and biopsy for lots of other things that could be causing his symptoms, and to get a visual for any inflammation or ulcers or other yukies. It is the next step after all he has had done so far. I'll keep ya posted.

Driver
04-20-08, 11:53 PM
A non-invasive test for gluten sensitivity can be done at enterolab.com--stool and saliva tests. Check it out. You may not want to have that small bowel biopsy if it can be avoided. Also at enterolab.com you'll see it explained why even a blood test may not be positive for celiac even if the person has celiac...the antibodies are in the bowel, not yet in the bloodstream.

Online labs tend to make some outlandish claims. The only true way to diagnose Celiac is via an endoscopic biopsy (which even then isn't 100% conclusive).

There are a lot of online labs that claim to diagnose all the allergies under the sun from just a blood and/or hair sample....they're not worth your money. See a gastroenterologist, that's what they're there for.

Driver
04-22-08, 06:52 AM
I mean what is TRUE autism anyways as opposed to misdiagnosed autism??? Yeah, maybe that's another thread. LOL! :-)

I'm pretty sure that ADD & Autism can be diagnosed from brain imaging scans.

As for your son, have you looked into Fructose Malabsorption? I suffer from that too. It means if I eat things like apples, pears, fruit juice, soft drink, cordial etc I get an upset stomach (and then some...). Also, we don't have this in Oz but it's prolific in the US, but anything with HFC (high fructose corn syrup) would be an issue for me too.

meadd823
04-22-08, 06:55 AM
Meadd, diagnosing and treating celiacs is not a scam

Please read all of my post including the last lines . . .

Celiacs is a bonafied condition - I never refuted that. I never refuted that dietary intervention is the way to go - I have a basic working knowledge of the condition - however Celiacs is not ADD - even if the two conditions over lap in a few symptoms -


osteoporosis and a car accident can both cause compound fractures of the tibula - the fractures can look very similar and both will be equally painful however even though the broken legs may have identical symptom presentation they are NOT caused by the same thing - some approaches will be identical however supplemental evaluations and long term care will take different paths due to the different causes . . . thus my point . . .


If scam artist only targeted fake conditions then none of us would be in danger of being scammed - a person with Celiacsis can be targeted by scamers and who knows maybe next year it will be their turn to be the condition con artist select to target . . unfortunately any one who is seen as suffering is vulnerable to the unscrupulous seeking to make a buck off false claims and the suffering person's desire for relief . . . cancer is another frequently targeted condition but it is harder because the effects or lack of effects is more objective where as ADD is more subjective . . .


I stumbled across this article, and I'm wheat intollerant... just wanted to know what you all think about it?

This is from the initial post which asked me what I though about the study - and I am sharing my honest opinion not necessarily the popular one or the one every one wants to hear . . . no one wanted to hear about adult ADD 15 years ago either but I couldn't let it stop me.

Before passing judgment on me perhaps understanding
I have spent decades advocating for the recognition of ADD as a "real condition" in its own right - ADD is not due to bad parenting, lack of corporal punishment, or too much TV ADD is a genetically based neurological {difference} in society it is experienced as a disorder. . .

Pardon me if I see every thing form food allergies to buttock hair growth being compared to ADD symptoms as subtle attempts to erase all those decades of hard work -

Right now we are comparing Celiac with ADD, last week it was ADD and artificial flavorings and coloring in food, Next week it will be some thing else that causes ADD like symptoms.

The overall score improves significantly as well asmost of the ADHD-like symptomatology specific features (Bonferroni-corrected paired-sample Conclusion: The data indicate that ADHD-like symptomatologyis markedly overrepresented among untreated CD patients andthat a gluten-free diet may improve symptoms significantly withina short period of time. The results of this study also suggest that CD should be included in the list of diseases associated<with ADHD-like symptomatology
Key Words: ADHD • celiac disease


I percieve these claims above as a subtle way of saying ADD doesn't really exist after all . . . .ADD is really a food intolerance so you just need to feed your kids better food and you won't have these probelsm . . which is right up there with if you just beat them more, let them watch less TV they wouldn't have these problems . . .

So please excuse me if do take it personally. .. . I have been advocating the acceptance of ADD as a bonafied condition it's own right for decades . . . I was born ADD unless they find a way to rewire my brain I am going to die with it. I can live with it because I have spent my energy on ways to work around it as opposed to denying it exist in favor of confusing my GI tract . ..

WHAT SEEM TO BE OVER LOOKED I have no doubt food intolerances effect the attention span but the attention being effected due to diatary intolerances is a secondary symptom caused by the primary problem malnutrution.

ADD the inablity to consciously control the direction of focus and length of attention span due to stimuli filtering problems is ADD - The attention span is the primary cause of the symptoms this claim is in direct opposition to what is ADD and no one seems to get that . . .


They are NOT the same = can they coexist sure but coexistence alone denotes two seperate condtions

The study presented in the initial post is looking for a coloration - truthfully if I look hard enough and tilt my head just right I can correlate ADD to just about any thing that effects the attention span. . .including but not limited to buttocks hair growth especially among women who can see thier buttocks . . .


Below please find a list of symptoms associated with Celiacs disease -
celiacs (http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#2)

Celiac disease affects people differently. Symptoms may occur in the digestive system, or in other parts of the body. For example, one person might have diarrhea and abdominal pain, while another person may be irritable or depressed. In fact, irritability is one of the most common symptoms in children.

Symptoms of celiac disease may include one or more of the following:

gas
recurring abdominal bloating and pain
chronic diarrhea
constipation
pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool
weight loss/weight gain
fatigue
unexplained anemia (a low count of red blood cells causing fatigue)
bone or joint pain
osteoporosis, osteopenia
behavioral changes
tingling numbness in the legs (from nerve damage)
muscle cramps
seizures
missed menstrual periods (often because of excessive weight loss)
infertility, recurrent miscarriage
delayed growth
failure to thrive in infants
pale sores inside the mouth, called aphthous ulcers
tooth discoloration or loss of enamel
itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis


A person with celiac disease may have no symptoms. People without symptoms are still at risk for the complications of celiac disease, including malnutrition. The longer a person goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of developing malnutrition and other complications. Anemia, delayed growth, and weight loss are signs of malnutrition: The body is just not getting enough nutrients. Malnutrition is a serious problem for children because they need adequate nutrition to develop properly.

{End Quote}


Please note the mood associations they used is irritability and depression - Driver described a brain fog - and malnutrition due to his GI's failure to absorb necessary nutrients caused his brain fog of that have no doubt - Driver however openly admits he does not have ADD -


Comparing these two conditions doesn't help the cause of either one of them - it only servers to create more confusion for all - The symptoms listed above do not read like ADD at all . . . because they aren't looking and comparing celiacs to ADD or any other condition they are looking at symptoms experienced by those who have varying degrees of this condition thus avoiding causing confusion by compairing it to five others digestive conditions -

Why is it necessary to create more confusion by comparing ADD to every other condition on the planet???? Isn't the condition confusing enough?

FrazzleDazzle
04-22-08, 07:47 AM
The OPs article DOES specify CD and "ADHD-like symptomatology specific features" only. It's clear about that. What that could mean, is that there could be a number of individuals out there that are misdiagnosed with ADHD and are being treated for it who are actually walking around with undiagnosed and untreated celiac's, or a number of other conditions for that matter, because individuals can slough off GI symptoms and go for the treatment of their "brain fog" symptoms, in turn, getting diagnosed and prescribed meds for ADHD. That is NOT to discount ADHD as the bona fide condition that it truly is or to nullify any of the hard work individuals as yourself go through to solidify ADHD as a true diagnosis. I have perfect faith, Meadd, that you probably don't have celiac's or food allergies or that your shirt tag, boots, or the kitten dancing across your keyboard causes your ADHD, and I don't think anyone here has disputed that. However, it is coming to the attention of a lot of posters here that ADHD is misdiagnosed more frequently than we may think, when it is medically well-documented that there are a myriad of other perfectly treatable medical conditions that is the culprit instead. Or that, fortunately, can at least partially alleviate or resolve someone's issues. Other untreated health issues that are causing" ADHD-like symptomatology" need to be pursued, treated and resolved, NOT treated as ADHD.

FrazzleDazzle
04-22-08, 10:04 AM
I'm pretty sure that ADD & Autism can be diagnosed from brain imaging scans.

As for your son, have you looked into Fructose Malabsorption? I suffer from that too. It means if I eat things like apples, pears, fruit juice, soft drink, cordial etc I get an upset stomach (and then some...). Also, we don't have this in Oz but it's prolific in the US, but anything with HFC (high fructose corn syrup) would be an issue for me too.


Driver, as far as I know, brain scans are not part of the usual diagnosis for ADHD or Autism (ASDs) but both are diagnosed through observation and meeting some of a list of subjective criteria. Since many of those subjective symptoms can mimic either syndrome, along with other syndromes and conditions, the chances of an actual misdiagnosis is actually very likely and possible. NO ADHD evaulation that I have ever had my son through did they ask him how's he sleeping, how's his digestion, how's his diet, his hearing, or his vision, or his thyroid or glucose levels, GI symptoms, etc. Though we ruled out other possibly likely culprits on our own. See what I mean?

Thank you also, for the info on the fructose triggers HFCS triggers. I have read for many that those are issues. I wonder why it's not used so much in OZ? How do you motivate a teen with little family support to learn to read labels, investigate and track diet and symptoms, and do trial eliminations? This is soooo hard, I just got the call that he's got another bout that will take him down for another three days. ~sigh~

QueensU_girl
04-22-08, 12:45 PM
re: #26

High Fructose Corn Syrup (from GMO corn)

I read a while back that this HFCS, despite being an apparent sugar, actually acts like a "bad fat".

It is not the same as the Fructose we get from eating a piece of fruit.

It's a bizarre substance. Some people think it is part of the reason Obesity and Diabetes #2 ("Diabesity") have exploded in the last 20 years.

Driver
04-22-08, 10:56 PM
Driver, as far as I know, brain scans are not part of the usual diagnosis for ADHD or Autism (ASDs) but both are diagnosed through observation and meeting some of a list of subjective criteria. Since many of those subjective symptoms can mimic either syndrome, along with other syndromes and conditions, the chances of an actual misdiagnosis is actually very likely and possible. NO ADHD evaulation that I have ever had my son through did they ask him how's he sleeping, how's his digestion, how's his diet, his hearing, or his vision, or his thyroid or glucose levels, GI symptoms, etc. Though we ruled out other possibly likely culprits on our own. See what I mean?

Thank you also, for the info on the fructose triggers HFCS triggers. I have read for many that those are issues. I wonder why it's not used so much in OZ? How do you motivate a teen with little family support to learn to read labels, investigate and track diet and symptoms, and do trial eliminations? This is soooo hard, I just got the call that he's got another bout that will take him down for another three days. ~sigh~

I know they don't use brain imaging in the diagnosis of ADD and co (because frankly it's expensive), but I do know that ADD'ers and Auties do show up differently on a brain scan.

Did you go to a GP first to get your son diagnosed? In Oz, you're first port of call is your GP who will usually run a litany of test to help you diagnose your attention and hyperactivity issue (e.g., ADHD-like symptoms). From there, the GP will refer you to a specialist. To my knowledge, I don't think a Psychologist or a Psychiatrist is going to ask how your bowel movements are working for you.

As for motivating your teen to try out an elimination diet: try getting him to agree to go a few days without your suspected cause and see how he travels. For me, I felt heaps better after a couple of days. In then end though, you can only help those who'll help themselves.

Failing that, a novel way to get him to document what he eats is to allow him to use a camera phone and photograph what he eats (that's if maintaining a diary would be too much or a burden).

As for HFCS: we don't do much corn growing here as the Americans do. We grow wheat and sugar cane, so we tend to use glucose syrup derived from wheat (which is gluten free) or sucrose (which is half fructose, half glucose).

Fructose & Diabetes? I'm pretty sure the link is there because fructose doesn't cause the liver to release insulin, and thus the body doesn't achieve satiety (feeling full). So people eat the fructose-sweetie foods yet don't feel full but still get the calories. For me, if I eat an apple, I will feel hungrier than when I began.

Andi
04-23-08, 09:26 PM
Although this thread has differing pov's that are irrefutably valid, which several points initially appeared to have been given without malice, due to a few guideline skirting responses, it appears that we can no longer have this discussion at this time.

Life is not always a debate or a battle to be won...try to remember that no matter where you are, from someone's pov, you will always be on the wrong side.

Have a nice day.