View Full Version : Shire Launches Nationwide Adult ADHD Mobile Awareness Tour


Dextrostat
05-13-08, 02:22 AM
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/080512/nym085.html?.v=101

Shire Launches Nationwide Adult ADHD Mobile Awareness Tour
Monday May 12, 10:28 am ET <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" height="4"><tbody><tr><td height="4">
</td></tr></tbody></table>ADHD screening initiative launches in Atlanta and continues for 90 days; Shire expects up to 20,000 adults to self-screen for ADHD in 13 cities across the country

PHILADELPHIA, May 12 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Shire plc (LSE: SHP, Nasdaq: SHPGY), the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced the launch of a 13-city mobile screening initiative for adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a psychiatric disorder that affects approximately 4.4 percent of the U.S. adult population aged 18-44 according to the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative household survey. The screening initiative, launched in Atlanta, GA, is designed to help raise awareness that ADHD is not just a childhood disorder. Research shows it is estimated that up to 65 percent of children with ADHD will continue to exhibit symptoms into adulthood. Adults who think they may have ADHD can take the first step toward recognizing the symptoms of the disorder by answering the 6-question World Health Organization (W.H.O.) adult ADHD screener. The screening initiative, known as the "RoADHD Trip," is housed, transported and anchored by the RoADHD Trip Tractor Trailer which expands into a tented area housing eight self-screening stations.<table align="left" border="0" cellpadding="4" cellspacing="4"><tbody><tr><td><script language="javascript">if(window.yzq_d==null)window.yzq_d=new Object(); window.yzq_d['UQ4DBtG_XLc-']='&U=13fnj55c1%2fN%3dUQ4DBtG_XLc-%2fC%3d628458.11775108.12525048.1383221%2fD%3dLREC %2fB%3d5156033%2fV%3d1'; ***********<noscript>http://us.bc.yahoo.com/b?P=wINwgESOxCZQcBC4R7gJJAOVQt4GOEgpMwUACVNN&T=1fadaifuj%2fX%3d1210659589%2fE%3d7811758%2fR%3df in%2fK%3d5%2fV%3d2.1%2fW%3dH%2fY%3dYAHOO%2fF%3d673 754331%2fH%3dY29icmFuZD0iPGEgaHJlZj1odHRwOi8vdXMuc mQueWFob28uY29tL2ZpbmFuY2UvbmV3cy9wcm5ld3MvU0lHPTE xMnNsZTkzby8qaHR0cDovL3d3dy5wcm5ld3N3aXJlLmNvbS95Y Whvby8.PGltZyBib3JkZXI9MCBzcmM9aHR0cDovL3VzLmkxLnl pbWcuY29tL3VzLnlpbWcuY29tL2kvdXMvZmkvZ3IvcGFydG5lc l9sb2dvcy9wcm5ld3N3aXJlXzE3MHgzM19sb2dvLmdpZiBhbHQ 9UFJfTmV3c3dpcmU.PC9hPiIgY2FjaGVoaW50PSI3ODExNzU4I iBjYWNoZWhpbnQ9Ijc4MTE3NTgi%2fQ%3d-1%2fS%3d1%2fJ%3dBAC28E44&U=13fnj55c1%2fN%3dUQ4DBtG_XLc-%2fC%3d628458.11775108.12525048.1383221%2fD%3dLREC %2fB%3d5156033%2fV%3d1</noscript>
</td></tr></tbody></table>"Shire developed this mobile screening initiative as a forum to educate the public about ADHD in adults and provide information and resources to individuals about this disorder," said Gerardo Torres, M.D., Vice President and Scientific Lead, of Shire's ADHD Business Unit. "This program demonstrates Shire's on-going commitment to providing information for those who may be struggling with the symptoms of ADHD."
In each of the 13 cities, Shire is partnering with the Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA), a leading adult ADHD patient advocacy organization, in an effort to assist up to 20,000 adults to self-screen for this disorder. Volunteers from ADDA will also be on-site to answer questions about ADHD in adults and to provide information about their organization. The W.H.O. adult ADHD screener, a questionnaire that is used to help recognize the symptoms of ADHD, will be available via on-site computers to help facilitate self evaluations. The W.H.O. screener is not designed to provide a diagnosis of ADHD but may provide information to participants regarding the symptoms of ADHD. Participants should discuss any questions they have regarding the W.H.O. screener results and other concerns about ADHD with their physician.
"Seeking information and speaking to qualified health care professionals are critical steps to diagnosis and management of ADHD," further explained Dr. Torres. "This initiative is an important first step to encourage that dialogue between patients and their physicians."
The symptoms of ADHD may lead to potentially serious consequences in adults. Surveys have shown that when compared with their non-ADHD peers, adults with ADHD may be:

-- Three times more likely to be currently unemployed;
-- Two times more likely to have problems keeping friends;
-- Forty-seven percent more likely to have trouble saving money to pay
bills;
-- Two times more likely to have been involved in three or more car
crashes;
-- Forty-seven percent more likely to have received more than one
speeding ticket in a 12-month period.

</pre>Adults who think they may have ADHD are invited to participate in a free self-screening when Shire's ADHD "RoADHD Trip," arrives in their area. The events will take in Atlanta, GA; Alpharetta, GA; Raleigh, NC; Simpsonville, SC; Albany, NY; Nashville, TN; York, PA; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; Milwaukee, WI; Taylor, MI; Ionia, MI; and Columbus, OH.
To find out specific dates of each of the screening events and for ADHD information in general, please visit www.ADHDSupport.com (http://www.adhdsupport.com/) or ADD.org.
About ADHD
ADHD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. Approximately 7.8 percent of all school-aged children, or about 4.4 million U.S. children aged 4 to 17 years, have been diagnosed with ADHD at some point in their lives, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The disorder is also estimated to affect 4.4 percent of U.S. adults aged 18-44 based on results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative household survey, which used a lay-administered diagnostic interview to assess a wide range of DSM-IV disorders. ADHD is a neurobiological disorder that manifests as a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is more frequent and severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development. To be properly diagnosed with ADHD, a child needs to demonstrate at least six of nine symptoms of inattention; and/or at least six of nine symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity; the onset of which appears before age 7 years; that some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g., at school and home); that the symptoms continue for at least six months; and that there is clinically significant impairment in social, academic or occupational functioning and the symptoms cannot be better explained by another psychiatric disorder.
Although there is no "cure" for ADHD, there are accepted treatments that specifically target its symptoms. The most common standard treatments include educational approaches, psychological or behavioral modification, and medication.
SHIRE PLC
Shire's strategic goal is to become the leading specialty biopharmaceutical company that focuses on meeting the needs of the specialist physician. Shire focuses its business on attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), human genetic therapies (HGT), gastrointestinal (GI) and renal diseases. The structure is sufficiently flexible to allow Shire to target new therapeutic areas to the extent opportunities arise through acquisitions. Shire's in-licensing, merger and acquisition efforts are focused on products in niche markets with strong intellectual property protection either in the US or Europe. Shire believes that a carefully selected portfolio of products with strategically aligned and relatively small-scale sales forces will deliver strong results.
For further information on Shire, please visit the Company's website: www.shire.com (http://www.shire.com/).
"SAFE HARBOR" STATEMENT UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995
Statements included herein that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time. In the event such risks or uncertainties materialize, Shire's results could be materially affected. The risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, risks associated with: the inherent uncertainty of pharmaceutical research, product development including, but not limited to the successful development of JUVISTAŽ (Human TGF(beta)3) and velaglucerase alfa (GA-GCB); manufacturing and commercialization including, but not limited to, the establishment in the market of VYVANSE(TM) (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) (Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder ("ADHD")); the impact of competitive products, including, but not limited to, the impact of those on Shire's ADHD franchise; patents, including but not limited to, legal challenges relating to Shire's ADHD franchise; government regulation and approval, including but not limited to the expected product approval date of INTUNIV(TM) (guanfacine extended release) (ADHD); Shire's ability to secure new products for commercialization and/or development; and other risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in Shire plc's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including Shire plc's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007.

Tara
05-13-08, 06:58 PM
I can't seem to find the dates on www.ADHDSupport.com (http://www.adhdsupport.com/) or www.ADD.org (http://www.ADD.org). Can anybody else find them?

ozchris
05-13-08, 07:03 PM
How very thoughtful and caring of them ;) I don't think this kind of drug company advertising is allowed in Australia.

If it's done properly I guess it could be helpful though..not just trying to get the most people diagnosed and treated as possible.

Tara
05-13-08, 07:13 PM
I think the idea is good, I just don't think there are enough qualified diagnosticians to send people to just yet though.

ozchris
05-13-08, 07:24 PM
I think the idea is good, I just don't think there are enough qualified diagnosticians to send people to just yet though.

Yeah I agree that's the biggest problem.

If people are turning up to their doctors saying they have ADD what kind of testing is the doctor doing? Is the doctor qualified to diagnose ADD?

Here in Australia we must go to a doctor first and get a referral to a psychiatrist. The only way to get meds for ADD here is through a psychiatrist that often specializes in ADD. GP's (normal doctors) can't diagnose or treat ADD.

Upside is that we have less people misdiagnosed. Downside is that people that acually need the meds have to wait a while.

ADD awareness is awesome but I really hate seeing it run by a drug company.

blueroo
05-13-08, 08:27 PM
Yeah I agree that's the biggest problem.

If people are turning up to their doctors saying they have ADD what kind of testing is the doctor doing? Is the doctor qualified to diagnose ADD?

Here in Australia we must go to a doctor first and get a referral to a psychiatrist. The only way to get meds for ADD here is through a psychiatrist that often specializes in ADD. GP's (normal doctors) can't diagnose or treat ADD.

Upside is that we have less people misdiagnosed. Downside is that people that acually need the meds have to wait a while.

ADD awareness is awesome but I really hate seeing it run by a drug company.

Who else has the funds and the motivation to do it? Just because Shire is running the campaign for their own gain doesn't mean we don't get to gain too. There are millions of Americans with undiagnosed ADHD and their lives are suffering because of it. Yes, Shire makes money if they're all diagnosed. But those people get a chance at a better life too. How many people post here on ADDF every month to tell us that they just discovered they have ADHD and life seems so full of possibility again because of it?

Tara
05-13-08, 09:21 PM
I'm still wondering if anybody found the specifics of when they are going to be in each city?

FrazzleDazzle
05-13-08, 09:38 PM
I'm not against ADHD awareness, but I am VERY LEERY about awareness by a drug company. I don't like that here in the US they can advertise and market as they do. It's embarrassing to work in an office where the physicians and staff allow themselves to be so easily schmoozed by their sales pitches, and they do it to the public too. Ask your doctor about treating your ADHD symptomatology with Shire products..........(all you really is oxygen when you sleep, or get through menopause)

It would be interesting to go and see what other options for diagnosis and treatment they are making the public aware of, or are they mostly marketing their prescriptions? I wonder if they would encourage many people to go and rule out other causes for their symptomatology first, particularly for cases of adult-onset ADHD symptomatology.

I just don't like this at all.

Imnapl
05-13-08, 10:41 PM
I don't think this kind of drug company advertising is allowed in Australia.Chris, are liquor or cigarette manufacturers allowed to advertise in Australia? They can't in Canada.

FrazzleDazzle
05-13-08, 11:28 PM
I wondered what the W.H.O. ASRS was, so I found the six-question self-report screen ASRS mentioned in the OP. It is part of an 18-question screen used by diagnosticians.

http://counsellingresource.co (http://counsellingresource.com/quizzes/adhd-asrs/index.html)m/quizzes/adhd-asrs/index.html (http://counsellingresource.com/quizzes/adhd-asrs/index.html)

However, as the ASRS Screener v1.1 is only a screening scale, not a diagnostic test, diagnostic assessment by a trained clinician is needed to follow up on patients who screen positive. (From med.harvard.edu)

Full version from the med.nyu.edu website (med.nyu.edu/psych/assets/adhdscreen18.pdf) /sorry, it got a bit skewed in the copy/paste process. :-(

Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) Symptom Checklist
Instructions

The questions on the back page are designed to stimulate dialogue between you and your patients and to help
confirm if they may be suffering from the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Description: The Symptom Checklist is an instrument consisting of the eighteen DSM-IV-TR criteria.
Six of the eighteen questions were found to be the most predictive of symptoms consistent with
ADHD. These six questions are the basis for the ASRS v1.1 Screener and are also Part A of the
Symptom Checklist. Part B of the Symptom Checklist contains the remaining twelve questions.

Instructions:

Symptoms

1. Ask the patient to complete both Part A and Part B of the Symptom Checklist by marking an X
in the box that most closely represents the frequency of occurrence of each of the symptoms.


2. Score Part A. If four or more marks appear in the darkly shaded boxes within Part A then the
patient has symptoms highly consistent with ADHD in adults and further investigation is
warranted.


3. The frequency scores on Part B provide additional cues and can serve as further probes into the
patient’s symptoms. Pay particular attention to marks appearing in the dark shaded boxes. The
frequency-based response is more sensitive with certain questions. No total score or diagnostic
likelihood is utilized for the twelve questions. It has been found that the six questions in Part A
are the most predictive of the disorder and are best for use as a screening instrument.

Impairments

1. Review the entire Symptom Checklist with your patients and evaluate the level of impairment
associated with the symptom.


2. Consider work/school, social and family settings.


3. Symptom frequency is often associated with symptom severity, therefore the Symptom
Checklist may also aid in the assessment of impairments. If your patients have frequent
symptoms, you may want to ask them to describe how these problems have affected the ability
to work, take care of things at home, or get along with other people such as their
spouse/significant other.

History

1. Assess the presence of these symptoms or similar symptoms in childhood. Adults who have
ADHD need not have been formally diagnosed in childhood. In evaluating a patient’s history,
look for evidence of early-appearing and long-standing problems with attention or self-control.
Some significant symptoms should have been present in childhood, but full symptomology is not
necessary.

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Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) Symptom Checklist
Please answer the questions below, rating yourself on each of the criteria shown using the
scale on the right side of the page. As you answer each question, place an X in the box that
best describes how you have felt and conducted yourself over the past 6 months. Please give
this completed checklist to your healthcare professional to discuss during today’s
appointment.
Patient Name Today’s Date
1. How often do you have trouble wrapping up the final details of a project,
once the challenging parts have been done?
2. How often do you have difficulty getting things in order when you have to do
a task that requires organization?
3. How often do you have problems remembering appointments or obligations?
4.
5. How often do you fidget or squirm with your hands or feet when you have
to sit down for a long time?
6. How often do you feel overly active and compelled to do things, like you
were driven by a motor?
7. How often do you make careless mistakes when you have to work on a boring or
difficult project?
8. How often do you have difficulty keeping your attention when you are doing boring
or repetitive work?
9. How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people say to you,
even when they are speaking to you directly?
10. How often do you misplace or have difficulty finding things at home or at work?
11. How often are you distracted by activity or noise around you?
12. How often do you leave your seat in meetings or other situations in which
you are expected to remain seated?
13. How often do you feel restless or fidgety?
14. How often do you have difficulty unwinding and relaxing when you have time
to yourself?
15. How often do you find yourself talking too much when you are in social situations?
16. When you’re in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing
the sentences of the people you are talking to, before they can finish
them themselves?
17. How often do you have difficulty waiting your turn in situations when
turn taking is required?
18. How often do you interrupt others when they are busy?
Part B
PartA
When you have a task that requires a lot of thought, how often do you avoid
or delay getting started?
The Value of Screening for Adults With ADHD



Research suggests that the symptoms of ADHD can persist into adulthood, having a significant
impact on the relationships, careers, and even the personal safety of your patients who may
suffer from it.1-4 Because this disorder is often misunderstood, many people who have it do not
receive appropriate treatment and, as a result, may never reach their full potential. Part of the
problem is that it can be difficult to diagnose, particularly in adults.

The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) Symptom Checklist was developed
in conjunction with the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Workgroup on Adult
ADHD that included the following team of psychiatrists and researchers:

• Lenard Adler, MD
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology
New York University Medical School

• Ronald C. Kessler, PhD
Professor, Department of Health Care Policy
Harvard Medical School

• Thomas Spencer, MD
Associate Professor of Psychiatry
Harvard Medical School

As a healthcare professional, you can use the ASRS v1.1 as a tool to help screen for ADHD in
adult patients. Insights gained through this screening may suggest the need for a more in-depth
clinician interview. The questions in the ASRS v1.1 are consistent with DSM-IV criteria and
address the manifestations of ADHD symptoms in adults. Content of the questionnaire also
reflects the importance that DSM-IV places on symptoms, impairments, and history for a correct
diagnosis.4

The checklist takes about 5 minutes to complete and can provide information that is critical
to supplement the diagnostic process.








References:
1. Schweitzer JB, et al. Med Clin North Am. 2001;85(3):10-11, 757-777.
2. Barkley RA. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Handbook for Diagnosis and Treatment. 2nd ed. 1998.
3. Biederman J, et al. Am J Psychiatry.1993;150:1792-1798.
4. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision.
Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association. 2000: 85-93.

ozchris
05-14-08, 12:49 AM
Chris, are liquor or cigarette manufacturers allowed to advertise in Australia? They can't in Canada.

Cigarettes can't be advertised but alcohol can. I don't agree with it but some of the beer ads over here are quite funny :)

I love Canada it reminds me of Australia <3

Prescription medication can be advertised on TV and stuff but they aren't allowed to put the name of the medication or company on the ad. It just says ask your doctor. Most drug companies don't bother.


Blueroo - Who else has the funds and motivation?

Volunteers, non-profit organizations I guess. There's plenty around for other things but no ADD ones I know of yet.

You're right though. Even if Shire are doing it for the wrong reasons (money) this will still help some people. It's better than nothing I guess I just don't like seeing ADD commercialized and meds pushed on people that don't need them.

I'll be interested to find out exactly what happens at this tour. Doctors handing out free trials of Adderall? Big blow up bouncy castles shaped like tablets? I'm not sure. Can't really judge it yet.

blueroo
05-14-08, 01:37 AM
Personally, I like making money. Making money and helping people at the same time seems like the right reason to me! But that's a point for another thread in another forum.

ozchris
05-14-08, 01:48 AM
Yeah making money is awesome ;) I've just noticed that helping people and trying to make money off them sometimes makes things a little messy. If it helps overall - great!

blueroo
05-14-08, 02:10 AM
I think you're worried about conflict of interest issues, and reasonably so. Some folks would take me to task for trusting a pharmaceutical to run a campaign like this whilst simultaneously denigrating a doctor of natural medicine for doing something similar. The reason I am more comfortable is because I have a leash on the big pharm corporations, and they have a lot to lose.

They can't out and out deceive the public. They're severely restricted in what they can claim, and the FDA can cut them off at any time. Their products are highly tested and regulated. In order to make a diagnosis and dispense those products, a fully licensed physician independent of the company has to do the medical legwork. They have no meaningful say over the diagnosis process. They can't influence doctors in any meaningful way without breaking the law and risking the wrath of the justice department. If they even look sideways funny, the entire mainstream media will be on them like ants on spilled soda. And if all that weren't bad enough, if the company does anything that hurts the company's image and market value, their shareholders will come down on them with a fury of biblical proportions.

Meanwhile, who's watching and regulating the naturalist druggists? Nobody. No leashes, no requirements for minimum scientific standards, and no accountability.

Yeah, give me a big pharmaceutical company campaign any day. :)

Dextrostat
05-14-08, 03:10 AM
I'm still wondering if anybody found the specifics of when they are going to be in each city?

For further information please contact:

Porter Novelli for Shire
Elizabeth True
212.601.8173
Elizabeth.True@porternovelli.com

Alana Brier
212-601-8432
Alana.Brier@porternovelli.com

Tara
05-14-08, 12:21 PM
Other than when they have booths at conferences Shire doesn't really advertise their medications. The name Shire is usually in Big Bold print saying they funded an event but they don't actually tell you to take their medications. For the most part they just give organizations the money and let them do the planning.

I know most people have mixed feelings about the pharm companies funding ADHD Stuff. If somebody else was offering money to do this stuff I'm organizations would not need to take it from Pharm companies.

Tara
05-14-08, 12:22 PM
For further information please contact:

Porter Novelli for Shire
Elizabeth True
212.601.8173
Elizabeth.True@porternovelli.com

Alana Brier
212-601-8432
Alana.Brier@porternovelli.com

So the the answer is no! They put out the press release before having the info availible on the sites!

Tara
05-15-08, 03:21 PM
I just learned that they will be in Boston June 21st and 22nd.

ozchris
05-15-08, 11:20 PM
Other than when they have booths at conferences Shire doesn't really advertise their medications. The name Shire is usually in Big Bold print saying they funded an event but they don't actually tell you to take their medications. For the most part they just give organizations the money and let them do the planning.

I know most people have mixed feelings about the pharm companies funding ADHD Stuff. If somebody else was offering money to do this stuff I'm organizations would not need to take it from Pharm companies.

That sounds good. I was expecting Shire meds being pushed on anyone who is diagnosed.

If it's just a name on a sign I don't have any problems.

Hopefully they have psychologists there that can do proper ADD tests. Just having those quick question sheets with the symptoms can be inaccurate. People being diagnosed with something they don't have = bad.