View Full Version : I'm convinced I have ADD. My doctors think I have depression


TwistyOne
05-17-08, 08:23 AM
I've been treated with anti-depressants for many months with VERY little progress.

Long story short, despite getting to the best collage in the country, I started failing over and over and was getting overwhelmed by everyday tasks until I couldn't even bare go to my classes, so I dropped out. I've NEVER been able to pay attention in class or even take notes properly in my whole life.

Here are my symptoms:
_ Inattentive.
_ Hyperactive.
_ Easily distracted.
_ Disorganized.
_ Restless.
_ Impulsive.
_ Low energy level.
_ Easily bored.
_ Short attention spans for tasks that are not interesting or that are difficult.
_ Daydreams often.
_ "Head in the clouds."
_ Worries excessively, even over unimportant matters.
_ Compulsive.
_ Has difficulty shifting from one activity to another.
_ Easily irritated or frustrated.
_ Significant mood swings.
_ Dark moods.
_ Learning problems and bad handwriting
_ Chronic sadness.
_ Often negative or apathetic.
_ Feelings of helplessness, hopelessness or low self-worth.
_ Irritability.
_ Excessive talking.
_ Temper problems.
_ Extreme moodiness.
_ Tend to be sensitive to sounds.

I took an online test at OneADDPlace.com. 20 points were enough to have a strong tendency for ADD. I got 56.

My doctors are hard-headed, and I'm trying to find my own way out. I was told by someone else that I probably suffer from PTSD which is causing ADD, OCD and anxiety.

Driver
05-17-08, 08:45 AM
Ok, a lot of those symptoms you listed there can be attributed to a male suffering from depression. And you said it's only been months on ADs, so it may still be a matter of finding the right AD for you.

It's not uncommon for ADD'ers to be treated for depression first before discovering their ADD.

Try seeking a second opinion, and/or trying another AD.

Another thing to consider is that you may be Bipolar.

Also, don't be surprised if the doctors simply do not believe in the existence of ADD.

theta
05-17-08, 09:00 AM
1: East Mediterr Health J. 2003 Sep-Nov;9(5-6):988-95.
Links
Co-morbidity and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Saudi Arabia.
Al-Haidar FA.

Department of Psychiatry, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

To review the experience of a child psychiatric clinic regarding co-morbidity and treatment characteristics of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a retrospective study was done on patients under 19 years who were attending the clinic and were diagnosed with ADHD. Co-morbidity and treatment characteristics were also studied. ADHD was diagnosed in 25.5% of the patients. Of these, 28.3% had coexistent expressive language disorder and 38.7% coexistent mild mental retardation. A psychostimulant (methylphenidate) was prescribed to 23.6% while antidepressants (primarily imipramine) were prescribed to 35.9%. Behavioural therapy was the most commonly offered psychotherapy. Antidepressants were used more than psychostimulants. Psychotropics had a more beneficial effect than psychotherapy.

PMID: 16450529 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

I remembered this study from Saudi Arabia. Interesting its related to your situation. I wonder if you could get better treatment for ADHD at King Khalid University Hospital?

QueensU_girl
05-17-08, 09:12 AM
There are three CORE areas where people tend to have symptoms:

1. Inattention (memory problems; executive function problems/planning/organizing/follow thru on tasks; underacheivement despite effort and intelligence)

2. Impulsivity (can be verbal ; can be spending or eating related; stealing, many variations, etc)

3. [B]Hyperactivity (can be non existent; often serious PHYSICAL hyperactivity stuff is outgrown after childhood; some people seem to present with variations such as restlessness; agitation; anxiety, etc.)

NB Inattentives can just have "inattention". (Easy to miss these folks.)

QueensU_girl
05-17-08, 09:14 AM
If you have a complicated medical history (you mention depression; PTSD and other anxiety issues), then you need really good evaluation.

I'd go the Testing route, myself.

NB. You can have PTSD and ADHD. They seem to co-occur. Attention problems are part of the criteria, actually, for the diagnosis of DES-NOS (disorder of extreme stress...aka Complex PTSD). ;)

Trauma messes up vigilance and attention and memory.

speedo
05-17-08, 09:33 AM
If the doc thinks you have depression he is likely to treat the depression first and then treat the ADHD. The reason is that depression can cause add-like symptoms. This means that the doc is likely to treat the depression first.

Attention problems cause by PTSD are different than attention problems caused by ADHD. In the case of PTSD, treating the PTSD will often improve the attention problem, but in the case of ADHD it is necessary to treat the ADHD to get an improvement.

A good neuropsychological evaluation would probably be a good thing for you to have done because your case is likely to be complicated and the doc will need all the information he can get.

ME :D


I've been treated with anti-depressants for many months with VERY little progress.

Long story short, despite getting to the best collage in the country, I started failing over and over and was getting overwhelmed by everyday tasks until I couldn't even bare go to my classes, so I dropped out. I've NEVER been able to pay attention in class or even take notes properly in my whole life.

Here are my symptoms:
_ Inattentive.
_ Hyperactive.
_ Easily distracted.
_ Disorganized.
_ Restless.
_ Impulsive.
_ Low energy level.
_ Easily bored.
_ Short attention spans for tasks that are not interesting or that are difficult.
_ Daydreams often.
_ "Head in the clouds."
_ Worries excessively, even over unimportant matters.
_ Compulsive.
_ Has difficulty shifting from one activity to another.
_ Easily irritated or frustrated.
_ Significant mood swings.
_ Dark moods.
_ Learning problems and bad handwriting
_ Chronic sadness.
_ Often negative or apathetic.
_ Feelings of helplessness, hopelessness or low self-worth.
_ Irritability.
_ Excessive talking.
_ Temper problems.
_ Extreme moodiness.
_ Tend to be sensitive to sounds.

I took an online test at OneADDPlace.com. 20 points were enough to have a strong tendency for ADD. I got 56.

My doctors are hard-headed, and I'm trying to find my own way out. I was told by someone else that I probably suffer from PTSD which is causing ADD, OCD and anxiety.

TwistyOne
05-17-08, 09:53 AM
The only reason I feel depressed is that I'm just STUCK! I cannot think! My mind just goes in circles. I'm confused. I don't know what to do or where to start. I can't do anything. I can't get anything started. I can't ever finish what I started.

I have a very logical way of thinking, but for some reason I just cannot think for myself. Whenever someone asks me a very simple yes/no question I get stuck and end up not answering at all. I can't make decisions.

There's one period of my life when I did not feel depressed. That was my first couple of years in collage. I have more memories of those two years than I have of my entire life. But thinking about it, I was still confused and disoriented. I was still lost. I didn't want to graduate. I only wanted to live in collage for the rest of my life. I could not set up my own scheduel without help. I still had no clue how to get around the university. But I was happy. Is this an indication that depression isn't my main problem?



I've been given medication for bi-polar and schizophrenia before. The schizophrenia medication made me more open out-going, but made me feel very disturbed and my mind was in a state of chaos. I've been on 4 to 5 different AD medication, but without any luck.


About my impulsivity. I tend to make the stupidest huge decisions in my life based on impulse. Just about everything I do is based on what I feel like doing.

mctavish23
05-17-08, 11:19 AM
TwistyOne,


I hope you can get some relief from the suffering & struggles that go along with the symptoms you described.

Here's some FYI "stuff" that hopefully will be helpful:

1) ADHD is known "all over the world."

2) THE best research article confirming that is International Consensus 2002;

( One of the links is at www.russellbarkley.org )

3) Among other things, ADHD is a "lifespan disorder," in that the symptoms change over age;

4) However, most people don't "out grow it," as the residual type is most likely to be present ( i.e., some of the ( age adjusted ) symptoms remain);

5) As a person grows older, they need fewer symptoms to meet the diagnostic criteria;

6) I don't have my notes here at home,however,if I remember correctly, individuals in their 40's only need 4 of 9 symptoms to meet the criteria;

7) While individuals in the 50's only need 3 of 9;

8) Look for the upcoming DSM-V to address the need for age & gender adusted criteria ;

9) The 1994 DSM-IV diagnostic field trial on ADHD contained a sample population of children/adolescents between the ages of 4-16 years old; over 80+% of whom were BOYS;

10) Research on adults has been lacking, however, that is certainly gotten better;

11)When you get a chance, please check out Kevin Murphy,Ph.D.,as he's considered tops in that area (He and Russ BarkleyPh.D., have a brand new book together on the current state of the research on Adult ADHD (published by Guilford Press) and;

12) It's almost impossible to NOT become depressed if you've lived with ADHD your whole life ( not to mention there is also a genetic connection between the 2 disorders).


I wish you a lot of luck in your quest. I think it's always fascinating to hear about the nature of the diagnosis & treatment of ADHD in other parts of the world.

That's why I'm blessed to have found the FORUM.

tc
mctavish23
(Robert)

Glimpse Inside
05-17-08, 01:09 PM
You may have ADHD, but your symptoms also point into other directions you might want to consider before getting labeled as ADHD.


"_Significant mood swings.

_ Low energy level
_ Hyperactive

_ Excessive talking
_apathetic"


If you experience mood swings, you might have some type of bipolar disorder, like Bipolar II or Bipolar Spectrum, which is a rather new concept and I wouldn't be surprised if many doctors were not aware of it. The important question is - do the periods of low energy and hyperactivity alternate, or are they same most of the time? Its difficult to be hyperactive with low energy levels, at least talking from my own experience. Unless by hyperactivity you mean only restlessness, such as difficulty staying still, having restless legs, etc. Are you always sad and apathetic, or do you sometimes become slighly manic and euphoric for no apparent reason, which may also happen together with excessive talking. Good information on Bipolar Spectrum can be found here: http://www.psycheducation.org/depression/02_diagnosis.html


"_Chronic sadness
_Feelings of helplessness, hopelessness or low self-worth.
_ Extreme moodiness"


These symptoms point to a more "traditional" depression, but again it may be the depressive side of the bipolar.


"_ Worries excessively, even over unimportant matters.
_ Easily irritated or frustrated."


These are anxiety symptoms, but anxiety goes pretty much with any psychological condition, so it doesn't tell too much.


"_ Daydreams often.
_ "Head in the clouds."

This is something very interesting, as I have those as well. I have also been diagnosed with depression initially, tried many anti-depressants to no effect. But this particular symptom - propensity to daydream and doze off - is very interesting, since very few books about depression ever mention it, and it is the most obvious symptom I have. And of course, its very hard to be focused and motivated on something, when you are in a daydreaming state, which is by definition unfocused. By daydreaming I don't mean having actual dreams similar to those while sleeping, but a state of mind where you are looking somewhere but not really looking there, your eyes are unfocused, and your mind is not really on whatever subject you are thinking. I think most poeple have it from time to time, and I remember daydreaming before my condition started, but now it became a chronic state of mind - mild daydreaming. I have read it may also be a symptom of anxiety, or possibly the mind's counter measure to anxiety, because daydreaming actually relieves anxiety.

TwistyOne
05-17-08, 03:16 PM
I might have bipolar, but the thing is that my manic episodes in that case are very rare, and last for a VERY short time before my depressive episode takes over worse than before.

I'm always very low on energy. I never can exercise or get out of the house. However, my legs can't stop moving. They keep shaking whatever table, couch or chair I'm at. And basically when I'm not sitting on the computer, I just keep walking in circles in a state of extreme restlessness.

As for day dreaming, I've had more than 10 years of training on NOT paying attention in class and finding other ways of entertaining myself inside my head. It pretty much got out of hand, and now I can't help but day dream where ever I am, like an addiction.



I have a confession to make. I took some unprescribed Adderall a while ago because I was so desperate. It was truly some of the best hours of my life. I felt extremely focused, and was able to write like I've never done before with a much higher degree of self-confidence and creativity. People said I sounded like a different person.

Of course, I realize it wasn't such a good idea. I felt my heart beating faster than usual for a while, so I'm not going to do it again. I only did it for the sake of experimenting, and it certainly gave me hope after all the anti-depressants failed me.

Thank you all for your help.

Glimpse Inside
05-17-08, 05:42 PM
I also take Adderall 10mg a day, and it increases my normal heart rate by about 8 bpm, making at around 80 while at rest, and I have some sensations in the heart area while on it. But like you said, it makes a big difference in life - I can concentrate MUCH better, my memory is good again, I get motivation to do stuff and just feel closer to normal. None of the antideppressants I have tried in 7 years, except when I initially tried Prozac, did make a difference. So I guess it doesn't really matter what label I am on (depression, ADD or anxiety), what matters is that the drug works. Amphetamines were marketed as antidepressants for a time, so they probably do help depressed people. And me or you are not the first people with initial depression diagnosis, who seem to respond well to Adderall, so its really not clear why it is reserved only for ADD'ers. After all, the diagnostic criteria for these disorders don't have any real basis whatsoever, and are so arbitrary, that future research may show that all mind or mood disorders are interlinked, and how flawed our current understanding of them is.

TwistyOne
05-17-08, 06:55 PM
I was on Prozac a while ago, and didn't feel much of a difference. The only time I felt a difference was when I first got on Effexor, but I went downhill pretty fast after the breif improvement.

So, do you think this proves that I suffer mainly from ADD?

Sadly, I have a significant level of anxiety, so I don't think that Adderall could ever be prescribed to me from what I've read. I don't like getting involved with chemical medication anyway, and a part of me believes that there's a more natural much safer solution. I've been reading on natural herbal medication, but most people don't seem to think that it would work. Ugh. I don't know what to think or do anymore.

mctavish23
05-17-08, 10:25 PM
Twistyone,

To date, there are No alternative methods for treating ADHD that "work."

There's certainly some that show promise (i.e., omega 3 ),however, that's not conclusive by any means.

I don't know if you have ADHD, and I sincerely hope you do get an answer.

However, I do know ADHD and what works vs what doesn't.

ADHD is 80+% genetic inherited. If you use the DSM-IV TR symptoms, the genetic contribution is .97 (that's not a typo).

The genetic contribution for ADHD is greater than human height (.81) or IQ (.55).

The other approximately 20% is considered to be "acquired(which can occur at any point in life)."

The most common means is by Traumatic Brain Injury, although there are several more.

The research is far from conclusive by any means.

At the same time though, since the first study in 1902, ADHD is the most widely researched childhood disorder on earth.

(This response is meant to be put into the simplest & most direct presentation I can think of ; as opposed to a scholarly piece of work).

So, cutting to the chase :

The data point to an imbalance of the neurotransmitter Dopamine; as well as Norepinephrine.

There are data on Serotonin as well;however, not as much or as widely accpeted.

However, this repsonse isn't about all that.

It's about the need to treat ADHD with medication.

That's not to say you have it.

It is to say that,beginning with the first medication study in 1937, over 90% of people with ADHD have responded positively to meds.

(Look it up in the US Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health: Chapter 3).

Lastly, there's an empirically (research) supported "One Way Comorbidity" between children/adolescents with both Pediatric Bipolar Disorder & ADHD vs ADHD alone (i.e., over 90+% of children/adolescents with Pediatric Bipolar Disorder also have ADHD, while the opposite isn't true).

So, if an adult has Bipolar Disorder, there's an excellent chance (94-97%), they also have ADHD as well.

The primary reference is Geller (2003).

The ADHD data are from the 40 page ADHD presentation by Russell Barkley @ schwablearning.org

Hang in there and again, welcome to the Forum.

tc
mctavish23
(Robert)

Glimpse Inside
05-18-08, 04:22 PM
"I was on Prozac a while ago, and didn't feel much of a difference.... So, do you think this proves that I suffer mainly from ADD?"

I don't think that lack of response to Prozac proves your ADD. Some depressed people respond to certain anti-depressants, but not to others, even if they both have very similar method of action, such as SSRI's do. Effexor is supposed to work on both serotonin and norepinephrine, so the fact that you saw some improvement with Effexor, might suggest the problem is with norepinephrine and not serotonin, and ADD is speculated to be norepinephrine related as well. So this may point somewhat to the direction of ADD. But again this whole diagnosis issue is so vague, that it all depends on the perspective of the doctor who is seeing you, whether he specializes in depression or ADD, whether he has better relations with anti-depressant pharma or ADD pharma and so on.

As for anxiety - some people experience more anxiety while on stimulants, but for some stimulants actually alleviate it. In my case Adderall increases physical anxiety, but reduces mental anxiety. So I may appear to be nervous and anxious, but I can think clear and maintain focus. If you have bipolar, though, stimulants are a bad choice to go with, for obvious reasons.

"ADHD is 80+% genetic inherited. If you use the DSM-IV TR symptoms, the genetic contribution is .97 (that's not a typo)."

I wonder how they come up with such statistics. Has there been any large scale ADD studies of identical twins, raised in different families? And how come, if there is such an obvious connection, as is implied by these numbers, many doctors still refuse to believe there is such a thing like ADD?

TwistyOne
05-19-08, 02:36 PM
I had absolutely no intention of having those two sentences connected like that. I have a weird style of writing, and my thoughts keep jumping around and not make much sense.

I was not talking about the lack of reaction to Prozac. I only mentioned Prozac to contribute to that other story up there. I was refering to the other parts of my previous post, like having severe problems concentrating despite not being depressed at all, and reacting very positively to Adderall.

What are the 'obvious' reasons concerning bipolar and stimulants you were talking about? I do seem to have a significant level of bipolar according to the online tests I took.

How am I supposed to trust my doctors to handle my situation? I can't. My experiences with doctors and psychololgists all ended up badly. I don't trust my doctors. I don't trust psychology science either, since everything I read seems to be contradictory. I'm going to go insane at this rate.

I know what I'll do. I'll just sit like a baby in my sister's house and find something to obsess about and forget about everything else. Worrying and thinking and trying to find a solution is getting me sick. I'll just carry on with my vacation until someone finds a magical solution.

Lunacie
05-19-08, 02:45 PM
If the doc thinks you have depression he is likely to treat the depression first and then treat the ADHD. The reason is that depression can cause add-like symptoms. This means that the doc is likely to treat the depression first.

Attention problems cause by PTSD are different than attention problems caused by ADHD. In the case of PTSD, treating the PTSD will often improve the attention problem, but in the case of ADHD it is necessary to treat the ADHD to get an improvement.

A good neuropsychological evaluation would probably be a good thing for you to have done because your case is likely to be complicated and the doc will need all the information he can get.

ME :D

Undiagnosed and untreated ADHD can also cause Depression. Which came first? The chicken or the egg? Which one is the chicken, and which one is the egg? I dunno either. :confused:



I was on Prozac a while ago, and didn't feel much of a difference. The only time I felt a difference was when I first got on Effexor, but I went downhill pretty fast after the breif improvement.

So, do you think this proves that I suffer mainly from ADD?

Sadly, I have a significant level of anxiety, so I don't think that Adderall could ever be prescribed to me from what I've read. I don't like getting involved with chemical medication anyway, and a part of me believes that there's a more natural much safer solution. I've been reading on natural herbal medication, but most people don't seem to think that it would work. Ugh. I don't know what to think or do anymore.

Some people have found it helpful to take a supplement containing fish oil, it sure has helped me. There was a study done in Australia (if I remember right) testing ADHD children with a combination of Omega 3 (fish oil) and Evening Primrose Oil that was very promising.

Behavior therapy is also very helpful, especially if combined with the right medication or supplement therapy. And some folks (especially those with allergies) find diet modification to be helpful.

mctavish23
05-20-08, 12:24 AM
Glimpse,

They come up with it via (literally) thousands of research studies;mostly using twins.

That's not the only method,however,I can assure you that those data are accurate.

You can read about the research in any number of books and/or journal articles.

"Research isn't personal. It's either valid & reliable over the long haul or it isn't.

If & when it changes, then I"ll change with it."

- Mctavish23

You can check out the Barkley 40 page article @ schwablearning.org

More recently, those data are included in:

Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: A Handbook for Diagnosis & Treatment (Third Edition) by Barkley & Mash (2006) Guilford Press.

TwistyOne
05-21-08, 10:49 AM
Sorry about earlier. I tend to do that every once in a while.

Ok. I want to point something out. Regardless of what state I'm in, (calm, depressed, relaxed...etc) I cannot read if my life depended on it unless it's very simple and short. Yeah, that means I probably missed a lot of things from these helpful replies.

Yesterday, I was trying to read some instructions for a certain program, and I kept re-reading the same short paragraph for five minutes as my frustration was starting to build up. I kept getting distracted by the different fonts and the very strange use of weird colors used in the screenshots. I kept skipping to the end of the paragraph, trying to make sense of it without reading the middle part. I'm probably exaggerating a little here, but you get my point. I had to take a quarter from my illegal Adderal stash before being able to complete it.

If it helps to know, I have a very high IQ level, despite the frequent brain freezes I suffer during the timed tests and am considered genius by everyone I know.

But it's funny because I never got passed being less than an average student except for one glorious year in collage. Funny how I used to sometimes explain things to the top students because they couldn't understand it, and they end up with A+ while I barely manage the C.

I'm not trying to prove anything. I just thought it might be helpful to point this out. What do you think?

Lunacie
05-21-08, 06:37 PM
Sorry about earlier. I tend to do that every once in a while.

Ok. I want to point something out. Regardless of what state I'm in, (calm, depressed, relaxed...etc) I cannot read if my life depended on it unless it's very simple and short. Yeah, that means I probably missed a lot of things from these helpful replies.

Yesterday, I was trying to read some instructions for a certain program, and I kept re-reading the same short paragraph for five minutes as my frustration was starting to build up. I kept getting distracted by the different fonts and the very strange use of weird colors used in the screenshots. I kept skipping to the end of the paragraph, trying to make sense of it without reading the middle part. I'm probably exaggerating a little here, but you get my point. I had to take a quarter from my illegal Adderal stash before being able to complete it.

If it helps to know, I have a very high IQ level, despite the frequent brain freezes I suffer during the timed tests and am considered genius by everyone I know.

But it's funny because I never got passed being less than an average student except for one glorious year in collage. Funny how I used to sometimes explain things to the top students because they couldn't understand it, and they end up with A+ while I barely manage the C.

I'm not trying to prove anything. I just thought it might be helpful to point this out. What do you think?

When I encounter something like that online, if it's something I really need/want to read, I copy&paste it into Word and then I edit it so that it's all one size and color, and maybe space it into smaller paragraphs.

When I'm on a discussion forum like this and I'm finding it hard to read a post that looks interesting, I'll use the "quote" button, then edit the other person's post in the quote window the same way (fonts all one size and one color, smaller paragraphs). Then I either write a response and post it, or I hit the back key and read the next post or thread.

I have a pretty decent IQ as well, was rather surprised to find that out as I had problems in school, especially with tests.

Just wanted to let you know that you're not the only one like this.

Glimpse Inside
05-21-08, 10:20 PM
What are the 'obvious' reasons concerning bipolar and stimulants you were talking about?

Well, bipolar people experience phases of mania, when they feel very good, close to euphoric for no reason; have little need for sleep, overconfidence, unrealistic beliefs of their abilities, feel very impulsive, etc. A stimulant may increase those symptoms. But thats just my opinion, and I haven't read much about treatment of bipolar disorder with amphetamines. Looking at it from other perspective, one may say that scientists were equally puzzled by the paradox, how otherwise hyperactive and agitated children would actually become calmer while on amphetamines. So my "obvious reasons" may be wrong.

When you mentioned problems reading due to anxiety, I remember feeling very similar way. Sometimes I would read a whole page of a fiction or academic book, but not remember anything I was reading about. I was very suprised, since I had a generally good memory before and could remember things just naturally, without trying to do so. Becoming aware of the problem exacerbated it even more. I got more anxious - I would try to force myself to remember what I am reading and thus started to read, reread and repeat sentences in my mind. As you may guess, that was counterproductive. When I look at it now, I think the problem was not so much concentration, but anxiety, which would keep my thoughs racing and make me unable to focus on something I was trying to focus on. My mind was constantly occupied. Somehow with time my ability to read became better, but it is still far from normal. And this is one of the areas, which improved significantly with Adderall. Even worse than reading is writing essays. While I could somewhat control internal distractions while reading, writing requires opening your mind to free thinking, and the "open" mind very fast gets filled with all kinds of worries. As a result, I can hardly make a plan on what I am going to write about, or maintain clear thought transitions. If I try too much - I will simply not write anything. The only way around that I have found is writing whatever comes to mind fast, without thinking too much about it or trying to improve the sentence. Of course, quality of writing assignments would drop, but at least you would deliver something, even if late.

Do ADD'ers feel similar way? Sometimes I wonder that if lack of concentration and focus were due to anxiety, then a good anti anxiety pill could produce same effects to amphetamines, if not better. But I haven't tried benzos yet, and over the counter anxiety treatment doesn't seem to give a noticeable bonus.

mctavish23
05-21-08, 10:46 PM
TwistyOne,

If you go look at ADHD in Wikipedia, you'll see a picture of the landmark 1990 glucose brainscan study firm the New England Journal of Medicine by Zametkin, et.al.

Interesting stuff.

tc
mctavish23
(Robert)

ditzydreamer
05-24-08, 12:19 AM
The only reason I feel depressed is that I'm just STUCK! I cannot think! My mind just goes in circles. I'm confused. I don't know what to do or where to start. I can't do anything. I can't get anything started. I can't ever finish what I started.

I have a very logical way of thinking, but for some reason I just cannot think for myself. Whenever someone asks me a very simple yes/no question I get stuck and end up not answering at all. I can't make decisions.

Yes! This is how I feel exactly!! I am in a similar situation, having been diagnosed with depression, social and general anxiety disorder. I also meet criteria in the Diagnostic Manual for post traumatic stress and agoraphobia.

I have gone to therapy, taken meds, and run the gamot for these mental illnesses, and yet what you describe is exactly how I feel all the time. I am very appreciative of the help I got for depression, etc and I feel that I have the skills now to avoid major depression and have almost eliminated panic attacks, yet i STILL have not been able to be productive in my life. In learning about adhd for my daughter and son who will be assessed soon, I am 99% convinced that this is the cause of all my other mental illnesses. I'm happy, but I only get anxious or stressed out when I have screwed up another appointment, or forgot to pick up my kids at school because I lost track of time trying to 'organize' my basement, etc.

My sister went into the doctor today (and I am sure she is in the same boat I am) and although the nurse set aside 30 mintues for my sister to talk to the doctor (who is also my doctor), she spent less than 5 minutes in the office and walked out with a prescription for an anti-depressant. 5 minutes??? Where is the responsibility to find out WHAT is causing the depression?? My sister's house is packed full of junk. She tries so hard, but can't seem to get through it all to make her house functional. If the doctor would have asked her, maybe she would have seen an underlying issue of ADD or something.

I'm worried that she'll just hand me another prescrtiption for anxiety or depression too. I've worked so hard to get off those drugs and maintain my mental health without them, and although like I said am grateful, I feel like it was all just a bandaid... I don't know what to say to my doctor to get her attention. I don't want drugs (at least not yet) but I want to be taken seriously. I'm not someone who is easily swayed by ads or suggestions from others. I've taken a lot of time to look at this, even taking a mental health course at college.

Sorry that I skipped a few postings, I just read this one and had to say that I'm in a similar situation, if not the same boat... you're not alone!

dorian_deficit
12-25-08, 12:51 PM
Your doctor isn't hard-headed. It's very simple really-- he/she just has an expotentially larger spectrum of knowledge in Dx'g and treating physical symptoms, oppose to mental (not their forte, so to speak). That said.. depression symptoms often run parallel with those of ADHD, so in reality your Doctor is assuming that the most commonly prescribed brain-hopping pill will be sure to put you at ease (plus, this is the easiest route of getting you the h*ll out of their office-- given their .6 second allotted frame of time to be spent in your company).

silvercastle
01-19-09, 12:56 AM
I got treated for depression first. The doc said besides depression I also had ptsd. He put me on efexor 300mg. Then I went to a psychiatrist and he said it was bipolar and so he added zyprexa to the mix. Then I moved interstate and went to see a different psychiatrists.

The new psychiatrist said it wasn't bipolar but I was still depressed so he put the effexor dosage up to 450mg. I went off the zyprexa soon after.

A few months later when the depression was no longer an issue, I slowly weaned myself off the efexor. A friend of my brother's told me about ADD and gave me some dexamphetamine to try.

So now I have a referral to see a psychiatrist about ADD.

It seems depression or other conditions are fairly common in people with ADD. I mean c'mon, if you have problems in your social life, at work, with your finances, in relationships all because the damn ADD symptoms and you don't seem to be able to make your life work the way other people around you can, yeah you're going to be depressed. Also I went to see my doc just after my brother died so of course I was depressed.

What causes what? ...I don't know. But one thing is for sure. You need to see a psychiatrist that not only actually takes ADD seriously but also knows enough about it to be able to help.

I think doctors are reluctant to diagnose ADD because they either don't think it is a real condition or because the best medication for it is a stimulant and they assume peopole just want to abuse it. How the hell am I supposed to be honest with my psychiatrist about my past drug use if they have that sort of attitude toward ADD and the medication that is used to treat it.