View Full Version : Comparative Study Demonstrates Metadate CD (Methylphenidate) Has ...


Andrew
03-08-04, 04:51 PM
Doctor's Guide (press release) - USA
... issue of Pediatrics comparing the effects of two extended-release methylphenidate formulations in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD ...
http://www.docguide.com/gpc.nsf/doc?CreateDocument=&n=22&l=PE&u=/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256E5100525B75?OpenDocument&c=Paediatrics&count=10

Energizer_Bunny
03-08-04, 06:12 PM
I have been on Metadate CD for months now and love it. I seem to notice the same thing as stated in the study. However, I take 40 mgs of Metadate Cd. 20 mgs in the morning and another 20 mgs around 3pm for school.

Winn
07-18-04, 04:31 PM
I have been taking Metadate for over a year now it seems to work great. I take 40mg in the morning and 40mg in the late afternoon. Generally I get 6-7 hours out of a dosage. In addition I also take an antidepressant, this combonation works great for me.

Alexa
07-23-04, 05:03 PM
I'm new to the group and looking back I've been this way all my life and thought it was just me and this is the was I am. My 11 yr old daughter was diagnosed in May and had her Dr. appt Wed and was put on Strattera. I had a Dr. appt the same day and he put me on the same thing! This was not my drug of choice for either since Medadate ER and CD are on my insurance formulary. I'm already having side effects from the Strattera but he will not let me try anything else until I try this. My daughter goes back in 2 wks and I go back in 4. This is frustrating.

shadowfax
01-10-05, 10:33 AM
Alexa, I sympathize with you. It's 6 months later; are you doing all right now? Sounds like your doctor isn't (wasn't) very knowledgeable about ADD. If he were, he'd have already known that Strattera is usually only 50% as effective as the other ADD meds (Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall, etc.). Try showing him some info on these other meds; he may not even have heard of some of them. You can get info on them right here in this forum.
If that doctor's still not helpful, see if you can switch to another one. Or, find out if there's a psychopharmacologist (a psychiatrist with special training in medication management) you can at least consult with in your area.
I live in a big urban area, and I'm lucky my psychiatrist is a psychopharmacologist and also very knowledgeable about ADD. But many doctors in other parts of the country just don't know that much about it. So, sometimes you need to take an "activist"
approach and educate people about it--including doctors!
Good luck, and please let me know how you make out. (I used to live in Tucson, AZ!)

shadowfax
01-17-05, 03:50 PM
FYI--I came across two excellent articles that discuss and compare all of the long-acting formulations for methylphenidate (MPH, or Ritalin): Concerta, Metadate CD and Ritalin LA, as well as Adderall XR.
The articles very helpful in clarifying the differences between all these medications.
They are:

"Considerations in the Selection of a Long-Acting Stimulant Drug"
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/464377_3

and

"Advances in the Pharmacology of ADHD"
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/462703_1

NISSYNICOL
06-03-05, 01:52 AM
Can someone tell me the difference between Metadate ER and Matadate CD?
Thanks.

shadowfax
06-04-05, 08:38 PM
Hello NISSYNICOL,

Basically, they're the same thing--extended release (ER) forms of Ritalin, except the release amounts and rates are different:

Metadate ER 20 mg releases the equivalent of 10 mg immediately and 10 mg four hours later. The surface of the tablet can not be broken. If it is, all of the medication is released immediately.
Metadate CD is the newest form of this brand and lasts eight hours. It is a capsule with multiple beads inside. 6 mg are released initially and 14 mg are released over the remainder of time. Unlike the Metadate ER, the capsule can be opened and the beads sprinkled over food and taken in this way.

I got this info from a great website that explains all the differents kinds of ADD meds available:

http://www.additudemag.com/additude.asp?DEPT_NO=504&SUB_NO=14

Hope this helps

NISSYNICOL
06-06-05, 04:25 AM
Shadowfax,

Thanks for the information. I went to that link and it was very informative. :)
Thank you for posting it. It did help.

adhdxyz
06-26-05, 11:25 AM
My 12 year old son is adhd along with ocd, mood disorder and learning disabled.

When he was 3, we tried the homeopathic route. Then ritalin, then dexatrine, then ritalin again and then Metadate cd. He has been on Metadate for quite some time.

I started Adderall XR on March 18 (I'm adhd) and have had great results. So, June 1 my son switched from Metadate to Adderall instant release and my husband (add) started Adderall XR on June 2. My husband has had great results too.

My son did well on Adderall from June 1 until father days (about 3 weeks) and then he developed a major tic. He started making a small grunting noise constantly. Several times a minute all day and all evening long. This went on from Sunday through Thursday evening. He hated it.

Seeing that it was getting worse rather than better, I sent his doctor a fax on Friday morning explained the tic and he suggested that we put him back on Metadate, which we did. The tic went away almost completed the very next day we switched back to Metadate.

When on Adderall, he also stayed awake much later than when he was on Metadate. Usually the clonidine he takes at bed time knocks him out, but not when on Adderall. He was up watching tv til 1am. He'd then sleep past noon the next day. (Luckily it was summer that we are testing the meds.)

Also on Adderall, since it takes away your appetite, he wouldn't eat. I tried to tell him that he would probley loose weight (which he wanted to ) but it was imperative that he ate even when not hungry. He didn't do this. On Metadate, atleast he eats.

Metadate seems to be the medication that works best for him at this time.

stanzen
06-26-05, 02:18 PM
Good Study. Thanks for posting.

The article in Pediatrics indicates a dose-response relationship for the effectiveness of methylphenidate (MPH) to reduce ADD symptoms in Children.

Metadate CD is more effective in the mornings than Concerta because CD releases more MPH immediately. Metadate CD delivers 30 percent of the daily dose as uncoated beads, Concerta delivers 22 percent by an overcoat.

However, Concerta is more effective late in the afternoon and early evening because it releases more MPH at that time.

From the original paper:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/113/3/e206

[W]hen adjusted for dose and expected serum concentration, the response to MPH from these 2 formulations does not differ.

Presumably, you can calibrate a daily dosing profile with immediate release MPH for yourself or your child. Then your doc can suggest a sustained release version of MPH that matches that profile.

Psychopharmacolgy finally seems like a science!

Both Concerta and CD are far more effective than placebo, throughout most of the day. I wonder what the small differences in measured outcomes between Concerta and CD really mean in the real world.

One thing to note: This study was funded by Celltech Pharmaceuticals Inc., the manufacturer of Metadate CD.

aj373ku
02-26-09, 12:57 PM
One thing to note: This study was funded by Celltech Pharmaceuticals Inc., the manufacturer of Metadate CD.

Nice job noticing that! The first thing I look for when I read any study or article is to see who funded it. Nine times out or ten it is the drug company whose drug turned out to be better in the article.

aj373ku
02-26-09, 12:59 PM
FYI--I came across two excellent articles that discuss and compare all of the long-acting formulations for methylphenidate (MPH, or Ritalin): Concerta, Metadate CD and Ritalin LA, as well as Adderall XR.
The articles very helpful in clarifying the differences between all these medications.
They are:

"Considerations in the Selection of a Long-Acting Stimulant Drug"
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/464377_3

and

"Advances in the Pharmacology of ADHD"
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/462703_1

Thanks for the medscape articles. Very good information.

elizadoo47
05-17-09, 07:04 PM
Question, then about ER and CD releases, and how they compare to Concerta and Focalin XR.

My daughter (16) seems to metabolize slowly and/or is sensitive to drugs. She tried Concerta 18 mg, which worked for her in the first 8 hours, the smaller releases. But that whopping release in the afternoon was too much for her.

She has since gone to Focalin 15 mg XR, which has a 50/50 release, each of 7.5 mg. She is great on the 7.5 mg release for the morning, but the later release seems to be a wee bit too high for her. So, as a trial I gave her a Focalin (regular 5 mg tablet and split tablet ) dosage of 7.5 mg in the morning and 5 mg at noon. This works the best for her, and I give her a later booster in the mid-afternoon of 5mg Focalin regular.

My problem is, I would like something that lasts longer but is similar to Focalin and less expensive.

Right now 30 capsules XR is costing me about $130 a month (using insurance) and 30 regular Focalin tablets is costing me about $40 a month. This is really pricey!

Does Metadate ER work like Focalin XR, with the same 50/50 release? and what would the major differences be?