View Full Version : Canadian newspaper report -- "ADHD cuts workplace productivity"


hollyduck
06-23-08, 10:59 AM
Old news, yes -- but with some fresh stuff, like this:

But people with the disorder received the study skeptically, saying it will only make their life in the workplace harder.

"I understand research is needed, but you begin to wonder, what were they thinking?" says Steven, a contracts administrator who asked that his full name be withheld ...

"Mental disorders as a rule do not have a good face in public," Steven says. "ADHD is a very misunderstood disorder. A lot of people think you just give someone medication and they're cured."

===============

ADHD cuts workplace productivity (http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080623.wladhd23/BNStory/lifeWork/home)

REBECCA DUBE

From Monday's Globe and Mail

June 23, 2008 at 9:05 AM EDT

People who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder work 22 fewer days each year than their colleagues who don't have ADHD, according to a new World Health Organization study.

[...]

"It's a surprisingly serious disorder," says study co-author Ronald Kessler, a professor of health-care policy at Harvard Medical School, who said ADHD has a more significant impact on work performance than he expected. "There's an enormous societal cost."

Dr. Kessler says he hopes his research, based on a WHO survey of 7,075 people in 10 countries, will prompt employers to offer more support to workers with ADHD.

Full article here: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080623.wladhd23/BNStory/lifeWork/home

theta
06-23-08, 11:35 AM
People who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder work 22 fewer days each year than their colleagues who don't have ADHD, according to a new World Health Organization study.


Thats not a very good way to measure worker productivity. For one companies generally do not pay people for missed worked days. Productivity is defect free widget production per hour. Which ADHDers may also suck at :)

NonSequitur
06-23-08, 11:52 AM
Well...duh! I would think anyone with a chronic illness or disorder works fewer days than than those who don't.

Dr. Kessler says he hopes his research, based on a WHO survey of 7,075 people in 10 countries, will prompt employers to offer more support to workers with ADHD.
We'll see...

Imnapl
06-23-08, 11:56 AM
Theta, I miss fewer days from work than most of my colleagues, so I too wondered about the statement that people with ADHD work 22 fewer days than their colleagues - until I read this:

The WHO survey asked people to report how often they did not work, cut back their hours or cut back on the quality of their work; the results were compared with data from the survey that included diagnostic interviews for ADHD.

Sandy4957
06-23-08, 12:12 PM
Lovely.

Where's my uzi?

Kidding. I'm kidding. But this study makes me insane. Like you, Imnapl, I missed LESS work than my colleagues until this year when I made a disability claim because my coping mechanisms (which I didn't realize were coping mechanisms) stopped working for me. I didn't take a vacation for two full years, never had kids, wasn't sick much, etc. And then on top of it I pulled a lot of late, late, LATE nights for my so-called partners.

Moreover, because I'm an insano-perfectionist, my definition of "cutting back the quality of my work" probably still equates to a higher quality work product than many of my colleagues are capable of producing on their best days. (Sorry. I know that that's immodest, but whatever. I'm done apologizing to these people for being more innovative than they are, since they seem to think that they're so much better than me just because they're capable of producing mediocre work faster and on time.)

hollyduck
06-23-08, 02:50 PM
... Like you, Imnapl, I missed LESS work than my colleagues until this year when I made a disability claim because my coping mechanisms (which I didn't realize were coping mechanisms) stopped working for me...

I missed very few days except for other, organic illnesses over my 20 year career. However, I must admit I was often AWOA (absent without absence) due to not finding needed paperwork, digging through the files, distraction, or investing lots of time in peripheral work activities. From my first weeks at work, I needed a lunchtime or afternoon nap, even 10 minutes would do it, but without it I went crosseyed with exhaustion. (Sleep Apnea dx cleared up most of that, but far from all.)

I was good at the individual elements of my job, and understood the technicalities better than my workmates. But you think I could put my head down and gnaw my way through the 100 stages of an extended project without interruption? Hah! Not once in my life.

But I regretted and puzzled over why I was so inefficient and scattered. I wanted to be far better at my job than I could manage. Often, I joked that I wish I had a control behind one ear, to turn up my energy levels when needed. I made that joke for at least 30 years.

Ducky

LisaJW
11-27-08, 12:26 PM
Lovely.

Where's my uzi?

Kidding. I'm kidding. But this study makes me insane. Like you, Imnapl, I missed LESS work than my colleagues until this year when I made a disability claim because my coping mechanisms (which I didn't realize were coping mechanisms) stopped working for me. I didn't take a vacation for two full years, never had kids, wasn't sick much, etc. And then on top of it I pulled a lot of late, late, LATE nights for my so-called partners.

Moreover, because I'm an insano-perfectionist, my definition of "cutting back the quality of my work" probably still equates to a higher quality work product than many of my colleagues are capable of producing on their best days. (Sorry. I know that that's immodest, but whatever. I'm done apologizing to these people for being more innovative than they are, since they seem to think that they're so much better than me just because they're capable of producing mediocre work faster and on time.)

I agree I think that QUALITY needs to replace QUANTITY and badly! I work in a call center and it's been made apparent by my sup and others that I may be gone soon because of the lower numbers I bring in. Naturally the good things I achieve get outweighed by the so called bad.

chartreuse
12-09-08, 08:18 PM
Lovely.

Where's my uzi?

Kidding. I'm kidding. But this study makes me insane. Like you, Imnapl, I missed LESS work than my colleagues until this year when I made a disability claim because my coping mechanisms (which I didn't realize were coping mechanisms) stopped working for me. I didn't take a vacation for two full years, never had kids, wasn't sick much, etc.


On the other hand, I consistently use every sick day and vacation day I have, (and then some), even though I very rarely actually get sick. It's just too overwhelming to work more than a few five-day weeks in a row.

If I switched to three-day weeks, I'd get at least as much done as I do now working five-day weeks, and probably more.

mctavish23
12-12-08, 01:16 AM
ADHD impairs sustained attention - the ability to persist until the task is finished.

Working Memory, which is the leading candidate to replace the terminolgy of Inattentive type, is the ability to hold on to information in your mind long enough to complete a task.

ADHD is really a productivity disorder.

It's DOING what you know and not KNOWING what to do.

This impacts more than the (adult) workplace, as it has everything to do with the reason why ADHD kids cannot finish their daily classwork in a timely manner.

Extra time doesn't work.

What does work is to target productivity ( give fewer problems/ decrease the workload).

If you hear the school counter with "That's not fair to the rest of the class," it proves they don't even know that ADHD is a developmental disability.

Not ony does the "rest of the class" not have an invisible brain based disorder, they're the metric by which you measure the disorder.

The clinical threshold for ADHD is impairment. No impairment,No disorder.

The metric then, is "developmental deviance (i.e., comparing the ADHD student to their same age/same gender, non-ADHD peers, who don't experience impairments from the DSM-IV TR symptoms)."

ADHD then carries across the life span.

For adults, that translates to job performance.

Thanks again.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

SB_UK
12-13-08, 06:25 PM
the world'd be a better place if everybody called in sick and erm... ... ...

left a message on the answer machine -

which ~ of course ~
nobody'd ever pick up -

because come the day after -

since people would have realised (from the experience of the day before)
- the error of their ways -

everybody'd just resign
(by phone)

(as above)

and grow potatoes to Keats in guitar-laden cranberry fields of peculiar hue.

vixthenomad
12-26-08, 06:30 PM
On the other hand, I consistently use every sick day and vacation day I have, (and then some), even though I very rarely actually get sick. It's just too overwhelming to work more than a few five-day weeks in a row.

If I switched to three-day weeks, I'd get at least as much done as I do now working five-day weeks, and probably more.

Likewise! :)