View Full Version : Chiropractic treatment of ADHD


Smitten79
06-25-08, 08:53 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm)


Attention Deficit Disorder and Hyperactivity



Studies in Peer Reviewed Journals

Chiropractic for Children in the News

The following television interview on Health Watch shows the benefits of chiropractic care in children with ADHD symptoms.

Dr. Marty Rosen, (http://www.icpa4kids.com/seminars/Schedule_Rosen.php) ICPA Certification instructor for SOT. View the news clip here: http://wbztv.com/video/?id=30936@wbz.dayport.com (http://wbztv.com/video/?id=30936@wbz.dayport.com)


Manual Therapy in Children: Proposals for an Etiologic Model
J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2005 (Mar); 28 (3): e1–e15 ~ FULL TEXT (http://www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/ymmt/article/PIIS0161475405000552/fulltext)

Heiner Biedermann, M.D.

The effects of uppercervical adjustments on the child with learnign disorders is explored and shown clinically.

Article Excerpt: KISS-Induced Dyspraxy and Dysgnosy (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm#section8#section8)

Developmental Delay Syndromes and Chiropractic: A Case Report

Blum CL, Cuthbert S, Williams S, Developmental Delay Syndromes and Chiropractic: A Case Report. International Conference on Chiropractic Research. May 17-19, 2007: CM53.

Chiropractic treatment for developmental delay syndromes (DDS), while controversial to some, has growing support in the research literature. Yet at this time there is no conclusive information on the causation of DDS. This ultimately leads to some lack of clarity about treatment options, particularly for children sensitive to medication or who do not choose medication as an option.

Patients are actively seeking alternative care, and particularly care that offers low risk and measurable benefits should be brought to their attention. Since for many patients and their families the option of no treatment for DDS is not an "option," we need to explore which patients might best respond to conservative therapies such as chiropractic.

The current evidence supports the premise that some DDS may be secondary to trauma and related to the sensory-motor impairment syndrome known as dyspraxia. While the studies are inconclusive, there is an emerging evidence base that does show chiropractic care may be successfully employed in the treatment of patients with DDS such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, learning disabilities, and ADHD.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 08:55 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)


ADHD Helped With Chiropractic, A Case Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15510091 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15510091)

In the October 2004 issue of the peer-reviewed research publication, the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics (JMPT), comes a case study of a child with ADHD (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), who was helped with chiropractic.

The case was of a 5 year old boy who had been diagnosed with ADHD at age 2. The child’s pediatrician prescribed methylphenidate (Ritalin), Adderall, and Haldol for the next 3 years. The combination of drugs was unsuccessful in helping the child.

At age 5 the child was brought to a chiropractor to see if chiropractic care would help. The history taken at that time noted that during the child’s birth, there were complications during his delivery process. The results of this trauma and complications resulted in a 4-day stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. The child’s mother reported no other incidence of trauma.

The chiropractic examination and x-rays showed noticeable spinal distortion including a reversal of the normal neck curve indicative of subluxations. Chiropractic care was begun and the child ’s progress was monitored.

According to his mother, positive changes in her son`s general behavior were noticed around the twelfth visit. By the 27th visit the patient had experienced considerable improvement.

The child was brought by the mother to the medical doctor for a follow up visit and questioned the usage of the Ritalin. The medical doctor reviewed and examined the child and based on that assessment and his clinical experience, the MD felt that the young boy was no longer exhibiting symptoms associated with ADHD. He then took the boy off the medications that he had been taking for 3 years.

The conclusion of the author of the JMPT case study noted, “The patient experienced significant reduction in symptoms. Additionally, the medical doctor concluded that the reduction in symptoms was significant enough to discontinue the medication.”
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15510091)



An evaluation of chiropractic manipulation as a treatment of hyperactivity in children. Giesen JM, Center DB, Leach RA J Manipulative Physiol Ther 1989 (Oct);12 (5):353-363 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=2607226&dopt=Abstract%20)

The principle aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of chiropractic manipulative therapy in the treatment of children with hyperactivity. Using blinds between investigators and a single subject research design, the investigators evaluated the effectiveness of the treatment for reducing activity levels of hyperactive children.

Data collection included independent evaluations of behavior using a unique wrist-watch type device to mechanically measure activity while the children completed tasks simulating school-work. Further evaluations included electrodermal tests to measure autonomic nervous system activity. Chiropractic clinical evaluations to measure improvement in spinal biomechanics were also completed. Placebo care was given prior to chiropractic intervention.

Data were analyzed visually and using nonparametric statistical methods. Five of seven children showed improvement in mean behavioral scores from placebo care to treatment. Four of seven showed improvement in arousal levels, and the improvement in the group as a whole was highly significant (p = 0.009). Agreement between tests was also high in this study.

For all seven children, three of the four principal tests used to detect improvement were in agreement either positively or negatively (parent ratings of activity, motion recorder scores, electrodermal measures, and X-rays of spinal distortions). While the behavioral improvement taken alone can only be considered suggestive, the strong interest agreement can be taken as more impressive evidence that the majority of the children in this study did, in fact, improve under specific chiropractic care.

The results of this study, then, are not conclusive, however, they do suggest that chiropractic manipulation has the potential to become an important nondrug intervention for children with hyperactivity. Further investigation in this area is certainly warranted.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 08:57 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)

Behavioral and Learning Changes Secondary to Chiropractic Care to Reduce Subluxations in a Child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Case Study

Lovett L, Blum CL Behavioral and Learning Changes Secondary to Chiropractic Care to Reduce Subluxations in a Child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Case Study Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research, Oct 2006:1-6. (https://www.jvsr.com/abstracts/index.asp?id=273)

Objective: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is extremely subjective in both diagnosis and treatment. No single cause has yet been determined for this disorder nor has there been a single treatment plan that is effective in a majority of cases. This paper proposes a possible etiology for some cases of ADHD with respect to concentration and hyperactivity along with a possible positive association with chiropractic adjustments.

Conclusion: There are many causes to ADHD as well as other learning and behavioral disorders; therefore conclusions cannot be conclusively drawn by a single case study. A possible conclusion that can be drawn in this case is that adjusting spinal lesions (e.g., subluxations) appeared to reduce the child’s pain and discomfort, which allowed him the ability to concentrate, learn and “sit still.” Further studies with controls need to be conducted in this area to determine the effectiveness of chiropractic care in aiding the symptoms of children who are classified as ADHD.

The relationship of craniosacral examination findings in grade school children with developmental problems Upledger JE J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1978 Jun;77(10):760-776 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=659282&dopt=Abstract)



This study examined grade school children and came up with a positive relationship between cranial motion restrictions and learning disabled children, as well as children with a history of an obstetrically complicated delivery.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:00 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)

Additional Chiropractic Case Studies:


1) Larry Webster, D.C. International Chiropractic Pediatric Association Newsletter. January 1996.


"After examining several diagnosed ADHD children, we find an upper cervical subluxation that can lead to neurotransmitter involvement."



2) A Mother's Testimonial. ICPA Newsletter. July/August 1998 (Dr. Angiolillo is in private practice in North Brunswick, NJ.)


"When Kevin was 3 he was diagnosed as having ADHD. After trying diet changes, allergy testing and behavior modification techniques, we reluctantly agreed to put Kevin on Ritalin. The medication did its job as far as slowing him down a bit, but he suffered many side effects. In 2 years he grew only 2 inches and did not gain any weight at all. He cried easily, had trouble sleeping, no appetite, and would "zone out" quite often.

Finally at age 6 we made the decision to stop giving him Ritalin. He grew 6 inches in less than 1 year and gained nearly 15 pounds. His sleeping and eating patterns were still erratic, and the schoolwork was horrible…his writing was illegible and math made no sense to him.

We brought him to Dr. D'Angiolillo for chiropractic care, twice a week for 6 weeks. This past week when I went to his parent-teacher conference, the first thing the teacher asked me was had we put Kevin back on Ritalin. I said no, and she showed me samples of Kevin's work and showed me the sudden improvement…for the first time his writing is in the lines, it is easy to read and much more age appropriate.

Although he still tends to move around more than the average child does, he is able to concentrate, answer questions correctly and is reading better than most of his class!"



3) International Chiropractic Pediatric Association Newsletter May/June 1997.



A six year old boy with nightly nocturnal enuresis, attention deficit disorder and toe walking (walked with his heels 4 inches above the ground). Medical specialist recommended both. Achilles tendons cut and both ankles broken to achieve normal posture and gait. Chiropractic findings included: C1, Occiput, sacrum and pelvis. After 4 weeks of care both heels dropped 2 inches and bedwetting decreased to 2-3 times/week.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:02 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)


4) ADHD - A multiple case study. Wendel P, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association. March/April 1998.

This is a 12-month study began on <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comhttp://www.addforums.com/forums/ /><st1:date Month=October 4, 1997</st1:date> of twenty-one children: 17 male and 4 female, ages from six to sixteen years. Eight of the children in the study are on Ritalin. As of <st1:date Month="3" Day="18" Year="1998">March 18, 1998</st1:date>, thirteen of the initial twenty-one children are still participating in the study. Five of the remaining children are on Ritalin.

Four Case Reviews from this study:

Female, age 10. The child had poor grades due to lack of focus on homework and parental supervision was needed to complete homework. After three months of care, she received "Most Improved Student" award for bringing grades from an F and a D to an A and B respectively.

Male, age 13. History included traumatic birth (cord wrapped around neck) and did not crawl as a young child. After four weeks of care (including learning to cross crawl) he improved his grades from four F's to a B, D and notable improvement in the remaining 2 classes.

Male, age 12. Run over by a car while riding a skateboard at age 5. He exhibited severe discipline problems at school with school suspension several times. Failing all classes. There has been little behavior improvement but grades have improved to a B, 3Cs and two Ds.

Male, age 15. Tested positive for allergies and had severe hand tremors. After one week of care hand tremors diminished. After 5 months grades improved to 3 As, 2Bs and 1C.

5) Epileptic seizures, Nocturnal enuresis, ADD Langley C. Chiropractic Pediatrics Vol 1 No. 1, April, 1994


This is an eight year old female with a history of epilepsy, heart murmur, hypoglycemia, nocturnal enuresis and attention deficit disorder. The child had been to five pediatricians, three neurologists, six psychiatrists and ten hospitalizations. Child had been on Depakote, Depakene, Tofranil and Tegretol. She had been a difficult birth, a cesarean had to be performed under general anesthesia. The mother was told the baby was allergic to breast milk and formulas and was stayed on prescription feeding.

The doctors told the mother the girl would never ride a bike nor do things like normal children do. The child was wetting the bed every night and experiencing 10-12 seizures/day, with frequent mood swings, stomach pains, diarrhea and special education classes for learning disabilities.

Chiropractic adjustments were given C1 andC2 for approximately three times per week. Two weeks after beginning care the bed-wetting began to resolve and was completely resolved after six months. She was also going to leave special education classes to enter regular fifth grade classes. After one year of chiropractic, the seizures were much milder and diminished to 8-10 per week. Patient was also released from psychiatric care as "self managing." Her resistance to disease increased and she can now ride a bike, roller skate and ice skate like a normal child. After medical examinations, she is expected to be off all medication within a month.

6) First report on ADD study. Webster L. International Chiropractic Pediatric Association Newsletter. Jan. 1994

Two cases from the ADD study are mentioned:

Case #1: Ten-year-old girl on 60 mg. Ritalin/day, severe scoliosis of 48 degrees Cobb angle. First seen <st1:date Month="11" Day="15" Year="1993">11/15/93</st1:date>. After ten adjustments mother reported a happier child, immune system doing much better and endurance much higher. Re-exam revealed scoliosis reduced to 12 degrees. By <st1:date Month="10" Day="1" Year="1994">1/10/94</st1:date> off medication
Case #2: 12-year-old boy diagnosed as ADD, asthma and seizures. First entered clinic <st1:date Month="9" Day="12" Year="1993">12/9/93</st1:date> and after 8 adjustments, parent has withdrawn all medication with the cooperation of their doctor. Positive personality change has been noted.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:04 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)

8) The effect of chiropractic treatment on students with learning and behavioral impairments resulting from neurological dysfunction (part 1). Brzozowske WT, Walton EV. J. Aust Chiro Assoc 1980;11(7):13-18. and Part II: J. Aust Chiro Assoc 1980;11(8):11-17.

*A group of 12 ADHD students reviing stimuland medication were compared to a group of 12 ADHD students receiving chiropractic care. The group receiving chiropractic care both hyperactivity and attentiveness improved along with gross and fine motor coordination. In the medicated group, hyperactivity and attentiveness improved initially (not gross and fine motor coordination) and the medication effectiveness decreased requiring higher dos-ages. Over half the medical group had personality changes, loss of appetite and insomnia relating to their treatment. The study concluded that chiropractic care was 20-40% more effective than medication.

9) Webster, L. Chiropractic Showcase Magazine, Vol. 2, Issue 5, Summer 1994.

*Case Study. Male - age 7 years. The child was placed under care on February 14, 1994 with the following clinical picture:

Hyperactivity, stuttering, slow learner, retarded growth, left leg approximately 1" shorter than right with a limp while walking. Medical plans were to break the left leg, insert metal rods in an attempt to stimulate growth and equalize leg lengths. Our examination consisted of Metrecom evaluation, full spine X-rays, and chiropractic examination of the spine.


Areas of subluxation were as follows:


Sacrum anterior, inferior on left, 5th lumbar body left, atlas, anterior superior left.

Patient was placed on an intensive correction program of 3 times weekly for a period of two months. During the first seven visits the legs were never balanced, however, each time a reduction of the short leg occurred. On the 8th, visit the legs balanced for the first time. Also noticed by 8th visit:
1. The stuttering had stopped.
2. The grades in school had risen from non-satisfactory to satisfactory.
3. The hyperactivity had abated.
4. The limp was no longer constant.


10) Case study: the effect of utilizing spinal manipulation and craniosacral therapy as the treatment approach for attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Phillips CJ. Proceedings on the National Conference on Chiropractic and Pediatrics


*A 10-year-old boy with a three year history of hyperactivity, also suffering from ear infections, headache and allergic symptoms. Chiropractic analysis revealed multiple cervical, thoracic and pelvic dysfunctions. The boy also had multiple cranial faults. By the 11th chiropractic adjustment hyperactivity symptoms had abated (his other health problems had cleared up from earlier spinal adjustments). After 5 1/2 months relatively symptom free he had two falls and hyperactivity, headache and allergy symptoms returned. A single session of spinal and cranial adjusting revolved this exacerbation. A strong link between spinal "dysfunctions" and hyperactivity is suggested.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:06 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)

A multi-faceted chiropractic approach to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a case report Barnes, T.A.ICA Int'l Review of Chiropractic Jan/Feb 1995 pp.41-43

*From the author's abstract: an 11-year-old boy with medically diagnosed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder has been a patient and student at the Kentuckiana Children's Center for three years...His case shows a history of early disruptive experience, repeated ear infections, consistent temporomandibular joint dysfunction, heavy metal intoxication, food allergy, environmental sensitivity and multiple levels of biomechanical alteration. This report emphasizes the need for care in all aspects of the structural, chemical and mental triangle of health in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. "He has improved academically and has advanced to the next grade level...he recognizes that he has control over his behavior and there is hope that he will be mainstreamed back into a regular public school setting soon...his mother says she notices improvement in his attention span and temper."


12) Effects of biomechanical insult correction on attention deficit disorder. Arme J. J of Chiropractic Case Reports, Vol. 1 No. 1 Jan. 1993


Seven-year-old male was referred by his mother because of radical behavioral changes (uncharacteristic memory loss, inability to concentrate and general agitation) following a motor vehicle accident (other symptoms included loss of appetite, headache, difficulty in chewing, ear pain, hearing loss, difficulty in breathing through the nose, neck pain, and bilateral leg pain). An M.D. diagnosed "attention deficit disorder" and Ritalin was diag-nosed with partial improvement. After four months, the mother sought chiropractic care.

Spinal analysis revealed anterolisthesis of C2 on C3, reversal of cervical lordosis from C1- C4. Correction was accomplished using the Thompson technique with the terminal point table, three times a week for 16 weeks and twice per week for one week....12 week follow up revealed restoration of cervical curve, with residual C2 anterolisthesis. At 17 weeks Ritalin was stopped by M.D., the patient's medically diagnosed attention deficit syndrome seems to have been solved as were the other symptoms. The mother discontinued chiropractic care after settlement and the patient's behavior symptoms gradually returned and is back on Ritalin.


13 EEG and CEEG studies before and after upper cervical or SOT category 11 adjustment in children after head trauma, in epilepsy, and in "hyperactivity." Hospers LA, V Proc of the National Conference on Chiropractic and Pediatrics 1992;84-139.

*Five cases were presented. Conventional EEG studies demonstrate responses of two chil-dren with petite mal (absent seizure) with potential for generating into grand mal. Upper cervical adjustment reduced negative brainwave activity and reduced the frequency of seizures over a four month period. In two cases of "hyperactivity" and attention deficit disorder, upper cervical adjustment reduced non-coherence between right and left hemi-spheres in one child and in another, CEEG demonstrated restoration of normal incidence of the alpha frequency spectrum. Increased attention span and improvement of social behavior were reported in both cases. A child rendered hemiplegic after an auto accident displayed abnormal brainwave readings. After adjustment, the CEEG demonstrated more normalized brainwave readings. Child was able to utilize his left arm and leg contralaterally to the injured side of the brain without assistance after upper cervical adjustments.




Review more research on ADD/ADHD at Chiro.Org (http://www.chiro.org/pediatrics/ADD.shtml)

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:06 AM
http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm (http://www.icpa4kids.org/research/chiropractic/adhd.htm) (continued)

References:

From Koren Publications' brochure: Learning Disorders and Chiropractic

Palmer, D.D., The Art, Science and Philosophy of Chiropractic Portland Printing House, 1910. Reprinted 1966,, DavenportIA Palmer College of Chiropractic.

Walton, E.V. Chiropractic Effectiveness with Emotional, Learning and Behavioral Impairments. International Review of Chiropractic, 29: 2-5, 21-22, September 1975.

Giesen J. M., Center D. B., Leach R. A. An Evaluation of Chiropractic Manipulation as a Treatment of Hyperactivity in Children. JMPT, October 1989; 12:353-363.

Feldenkrais, M., Body and Mature Behavior. Independence, MO International University Press, 1949.

Lowen, A., Physical Dynamics of Character Structure. Grune and Stratton, 1958.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:11 AM
http://www.newsmax.com/health/adult_ADHD_chiropractic/2007/09/06/30292.html (http://www.newsmax.com/health/adult_ADHD_chiropractic/2007/09/06/30292.html)


Chiropractic Care May Help Adult ADHD

Thursday, September 6, 2007A pilot study, published in the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research (www.jvsr.com), suggests that chiropractic care may help adults suffering from concentration problems and attention deficit (ADD/ADHD).

The study was performed by Yannick Pauli DC, director of the "Centre Wellness NeuroFit" in Lausanne Switzerland Dr. Pauli is a chiropractor specializing in wellness neurology.


"In this pilot study, we used objective outcome measures to evaluate attention in nine adult patients before and after two months of wellness chiropractic care. All patients experienced significant improvement in concentration and 88% normalized parts of the test," explained Dr. Pauli. "Although the results are preliminary and more research is needed, the outcome of the study suggests that patients suffering from attention deficit benefited from chiropractic care."

Research has shown that the ability to concentrate is affected in a number of disorders such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), traumatic brain injuries, dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.


In the United States, between 1-6 percent of adults and 3-10 percent of children suffer from ADHD. Problems with attention go far beyond the ability to concentrate. Epidemiological studies have shown that individuals suffering from ADHD suffer greater risks associated with daily living such as higher rates of car accidents, increased risk of substance abuse, greater risk of failing school, increased likelihood of divorce and even greater difficulty managing money.


According to Pauli, concentration problems affect all parts of our life and even possibly our ability to heal. Although most people think of attention as the ability to focus on the external world only, new health paradigms indicate that we can direct our attention inward as well. The clinical experience of Pauli and his colleagues suggests that our ability to heal is highly dependent upon the ability of our brain to pay attention to what is going in the body.

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:12 AM
http://www.newsmax.com/health/adult_ADHD_chiropractic/2007/09/06/30292.html (http://www.newsmax.com/health/adult_ADHD_chiropractic/2007/09/06/30292.html) (continued)

"Studies done with people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that those patients suffer when parts of their brain become deactivated, such as the prefrontal cortex, while others become hyperfunctioning," Pauli noted." Our hypothesis is that this leads to an inability for the brain to pay attention to the body's internal processes, resulting in decreased body awareness and decreased ability to access healing resources. Our study is part of a first attempt to document whether chiropractic care could be helpful to improve attention, and therefore all areas of life that are dependent upon this crucial cognitive function."

Usually, attention deficit is a clinical diagnosis. But to avoid potential subjectivity, Pauli used an objective measure of attention, called a continuous performance test. "It is a computer-based evaluation that objectively measures various parameters of attention" he explained. "This system is also used by some neurologists and psychiatrists to find the exact dosage of medication they are going to prescribe for attention deficit sufferers. Our preliminary results suggest that attention can be improved naturally with chiropractic."


The connection between attention, a process occurring in the brain, and chiropractic, which is generally associated with spinal health, is not readily obvious to most people. Yet, the research emphasizes the direct link between the spine and brain activity.


"As a chiropractor specializing in wellness neurology, I understand that the spine is as much about neurology as it is about biomechanics" Pauli states.


The articulations and the muscles of the spine are rich in mechanoreceptors, which are sensors that send information to the nerve system. "Each time we work with the spine, we activate neurological circuits in the direction of the brain and bring the nerve system into balance," the researcher says.


Pauli also notes that chiropractors affect, in particular, a small part at the back of the brain called the cerebellum. Studies have shown that this structure is involved in attention. "Higher parts of the brain are also dependent upon the proper balance and function in the cerebellum," he elaborated. "If the cerebellum does not function at par, the rest of the brain becomes somewhat clumsy and by activating the spinal receptors and balancing the cerebellum, we help the brain function better."


According to Matthew McCoy, DC, editor of the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research, "this preliminary study is exciting. It is part of an increasing amount of research suggesting that chiropractic care may be an effective natural choice for people suffering from ADD/ADHD. It offers the possibility of a new option for millions of children and adults that are seeking to manage their conditions naturally."

Smitten79
06-25-08, 09:12 AM
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=52210&page=3
hannahsmom: (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=587198&postcount=49)


OH! I forgot to mention.... I started chiropractic treatment a few months ago, and that has worked wonders on some aspects of my ADD. My neck was so far out of alignment it was unreal. He's been adjusting my atlas/axis (the very top vertebrae) and I could tell a difference after the first adjustment. Maybe it will help some of you.. and sometimes insurance will cover it.


Hannahsmom, which symptoms of ADHD were helped by chiropractic treatments? Did you have to tell your chiropractor that you wanted treatment for ADHD?

especially after the first few treatments, I noticed my mood was better and I wasn't so impatient, especially with other people. I had more energy to be patient with my toddler. That has kind of stabilized but it has stayed much better than it was before. My attention span seems longer, too. I don't get as fidgety at the computer, etc... I have more 'good' days than I used to since starting treatments (My ADD seems to run in cycles, with a few good days a month and then a lot of bad ones) It has helped me to feel calmer, and my mind is quieter although it's not where I want it to be just yet. I notice that when I don't go in for 10 days or so, some of those symptoms start to return, especially the mood issues.

What it hasn't helped-- (not yet, anyway) ... my mind is not yet quiet enough to allow me to start a task and stay on task. I try to do something and end up staring at the task at hand (even dishes).... I would think that symptom relief would be different for everyone, depending on your area of misalignment.

My doctor was aware I had ADD, but that was not my reason for treatment... (I had a lingering injury related to my daughter's birth) it was just a lucky bonus. He is pretty open to alternative treatments for ADD however, and knew of the benefits of chiropractic treatment (I think it would be even more helpful in children, since their misalignments are still relatively new) He's also a big fan of Omega-3's for just about everything, including ADD treatment. He's got all kinds of other therapies that might also help, like some sort of nerve stimulation and phsyical therapies, but right now I'm on self pay so the adjustments are all I can afford. It's worked well enough for me that I continue to see him for adjustments.

a good chiropractor should be aware of therapies to treat ADD and should take X-rays. (A lot of them offer free consultations including X-rays) In a normal X-ray there should be a soft curve to the upper vertebrae in the neck, like a 'C' (I think it's about 43 degrees)... mine was ZERO. The bones in my neck were in a straight line, leaning forward. It was 'pushing' on my thyroid (hello, I have hypothyroidism)... so it came as no surprise that my brain is also probably not functioning at its optimal level. An interesting side note: about a month after starting treatments, I noticed that one of my wisdom teeth came in completely. It's been about half impacted by soft tissue for 20 years. So he's obviously making some physical changes to my head and neck.

I think if your ADD issue is related to misalignment, the sooner you get in for treatment the better. I think I'm trying to correct at least 25 years of misalignment.
anyway, I hope that helped.... I'm still ADD, I'm just not as ADD

theta
06-25-08, 09:43 AM
My first rule of thumb in determining if a chiropractor is a total fraud is if he tries to sign you up for regular visits(most do). The walk in no appointment required come as needed approach seems so much more legit to me. Second thing is an honest chiropractor knows he can not treat major disease and knows to recommend a person see a real doctor in those cases.

FrazzleDazzle
06-25-08, 02:42 PM
Thanks for the info, Smitten, glad it's helped you!

Theta, Chiropractors are real doctors; they have degrees from real colleges, take real board exams, are overseen by real governing boards, do real bonafide research and publish in peer-reviewed journals, and have to follow all the same practice legalities as other physicians. I hope you really meant to say "medical" doctors. :p

And, most chiropractors don't (and can't) claim to treat anything but subluxations. :)

theta
06-25-08, 02:56 PM
I hope you really meant to say "medical" doctors. :p



CNN had a policy of not calling non-medical doctors "doctors". A lot of the world when they hear "doctor" they assume it means medical doctor.

Smitten79
06-26-08, 06:25 AM
Thanks for the replies:).

Below is an article from back in 1994 - interesting that Burroughs focused on the upper cervical (C1-C3 vertebrae) area as the cause of brain stem dysfunction. If I was using a chiropractor I would make sure they read all the literature and focused especially on the parts that may be relevant for ADHD.

Also interesting is that even back in the early-mid 1990s there was "neuro-synergy, a chiropractic technique originated by Guy Schenker, D.C., that focuses on functional neurological disorders such as learning disabilities, ADHD, and scoliosis."

http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/1994/jun/jun1994e.htm
June 1994
Chiropractic and ADHD

by George Burroughs, D.C.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects millions of Americans -- adults as well as children. By definition, ADHD is a neurologically based disorder and should, therefore, be treated by the experts in functional neurological disorders: doctors of chiropractic.
The drug Ritalin has not been tested for long-term side-effects or for any withdrawal-related complications, yet it is routinely given to individuals diagnosed with ADHD.
At best, Ritalin is simply masking the underlying neurological dysfunction associated with ADHD without doing anything to help ascertain a cure. Unfortunately, at its worst, the drug may be destroying the lives of millions of children. I find neither extreme appealing.
How can chiropractic help?
Probably the best way to begin helping an individual with ADHD, or their parents, is by educating them -- not about ADHD, but about chiropractic. A good starting point is to make sure they understand that chiropractic doesn't treat ADHD. Instead, inform them that chiropractic's goal is to treat the underlying cause of ADHD.
Once the involved individuals understand the value of a treatment that addresses the cause of ADHD, the doctor should further educate them regarding chiropractic. Quite simply, it is important to teach people that "subluxations" are structural misalignments that cause neurological dysfunctions, and that the specific purpose of chiropractic is to identify and eliminate such subluxations.
Symptoms give clue
If course, there is no one specific subluxation that leads to the neurological manifestation of ADHD. However, the symptoms related to ADHD (hyperactivity, inability to pay attention, impulsivity) seem to indicate a disturbance with brain stem function. This idea of brain stem dysfunction is actually supported by the manufacturer of Ritalin who admits that although "how" Ritalin works is not completely understood, it does appear to affect the brain stem.
I find this correlation between brain stem dysfunction and ADHD extremely interesting for chiropractic because a subluxation to the upper cervical (C1-C3) area can be the cause of brain stem dysfunction. Therefore, although every segment of the spine should always be assessed, chiropractors must pay special attention to the upper cervical region when treating individuals with ADHD.
One manner in which upper cervical subluxations can affect brain stem function is through direct pressure. Many upper cervical techniques are aware of the potential of this occurring and teach this along with their technique procedures. A second, and in my opinion more common, manner in which upper cervical subluxations can affect brain stem function is through altered proprioceptive input to the brain stem from the C1-C3 vertebrae and the related soft-tissue structures.
Proprioceptive "input" from the upper cervical area is required by the brain stem before a variety of neurological "outputs" or functions can be performed. Like a computer, the quality of the upper cervical "input" will determine the quality of the "output". Therefore, if the input to the brain stem is altered (as is the case with an upper cervical subluxation), the output from the brain stem will also be altered.
In my opinion, ADHD is simply one example of altered brain stem "output". The key to correction, therefore, lies not in treating the ADHD, but in treating the altered sensory input that caused the ADHD. Although somewhat confusing, I believe that understanding this is paramount to understanding how chiropractic "works" in cases involving ADHD.
It is only fair to state that, although proprioceptive information from the upper cervical area is the most important spinal-related source of sensory input to the brain stem, it is not the only source of such input. Proprioceptive, or more accurately, "position sense" information is also sent directly to the brain stem from the vestibular and visual areas. Once in the brain stem, the sensory input from all three areas (upper cervical, vestibular, and visual) is utilized to determine many brain stem functions, including activity (or hyperactivity) levels.
Although the subject of craniopathy is often controversial in our profession, cranial misalignments do exist and they are capable of producing nervous system interference. For this reason, cranial misalignments that alter the "position sense" of the vestibular or visual areas will also contribute to the manifestation of functional neurological disorders such as ADHD. Therefore, it is not unusual to find sphenoid, maxilla, and/or temporal bone subluxations (as well as upper cervical subluxations) in children with ADHD.
Correcting subluxations, regardless of their location, is a vital contribution that only chiropractors can offer to children with ADHD. These children, along their parents and teachers, need to be educated regarding the dangers of Ritalin and also about the power of chiropractic. Ultimately, all children should be able to experience the joy of a well-adjusted body.
(Dr. George Burroughs is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Life College, with a B.S. degree from the State University of New York at Albany. He assisted in the development of neuro-synergy, a chiropractic technique originated by Guy Schenker, D.C., that focuses on functional neurological disorders such as learning disabilities, ADHD, and scoliosis. Dr. Burroughs has a private practice in Mobile, Ala.)<!--mstheme-->

MECMR
06-26-08, 07:15 AM
Theta's cautions are very good ones. There are people who claim to be "doctors" and brinig people in simply to obtain thier fees.

Chiropractors do go to college, and have degrees which allow them to be doctors in the sense of having a doctorate, at least in my experience. They are NOT medical doctors, and unless they also have an M.D degree, or at least a D.O. (Osteopath, or doctor of osteopathy, which in some states is allowed the same privledges as an M.D.) they cannot call themselves as such and should not pretend to know as much.

Having said that, I saw a chiropractor for a numer of years as an adolescent and continued into adulthood. I have scoliosis, diagnosed at just before age 8, and the chiropractic treatments corrected my curvatures far better than the brace did in a shorter amount of time. (My mother had x-rays taken and reviewed by an M.D. who specialized in pediatric orthopedics and scoliosis. This was done before, during, and after my brace and chiropractic treatment.) The D.C I saw went to a chiropractic college where the requirements included learning and understanding many major medical tests, including EKGs, EEGs, and such. He cannot administer them, but at least he gets it if someone says "My blood tests say my creatine is off" or "My EKG says my heartrate is elevated and my blood pressure is very high."

The chiropractor who treated me back then reduced or increased treatments as things got better or worse for each patient. I know of one man who used to walk into his office with one hand practically hanging on the ground; by the time he moved to California after two years of threatment, he was walking with only a slight limp and was coming in once a month. When I went to college, the chiropractor I found in that area kept trying to convince me to come in for the sniffles. I did feel better after an adjustment at that time, but I did not like feeling as though I was obligated to come in for a hangnail. He thought differently. I left.

I do know that I was much more alert when I received regular adjustments. I have a younger brother with autism, and he enjoys getting adjustments. When our family went once a week for them, his mood and behavior was much more...amenable? I don't know how to phrase it, but he was more content and social than he is now that he does not receive adjustment on a regular basis.

The debate about correcting subluxations could go on for decades and never be resolved. Perhaps one thing could be brought up: relieving tension/pain/aches in the back and neck means one less issue to deal with, and that alone could aid in someone being able to concentrate a fraction better.

Think about it: if you are in pain, isn't it harder to concentrate? Doesn't tension in the neck and shoulders indicate a reason to be distressed? If that is relieved, doesn't that help?

I'm just throwing out the thought, throw rotted fruit if you like :)

FrazzleDazzle
06-26-08, 08:19 PM
Sorry Smitten, I thought you already had undergone treatment with a chiropractor.....

But, to second your citations, and what MECMR said, after working for a chiropractic clinic for nearly 10 years and treating all sorts of age groups and ailments, we saw a lot of not only specific conditions improve, some life long, but whole body and mind healing as well. We had a large patient base of children as well, and they respond extremely well to the treatments in general.

One of the questions that came up here was a frequency of treatment. I just wanted to add that chiropractic is not a quick fix by any means, because it is dealing with the soft tissues of the musculature, there is no "brace" or "cast" or "pin" to hold the weak areas in place until they become stronger and adjust to their more proper positions. Even someone with braces on their teeth have to have them in place for a long time, and they need to be kept in place when complete through retention. That is another reason why after chiropractic treatment, they often recommend maintenance treatments to correct any natural tendencies of the spine and soft tissues to adjust back to the improper alignment, just as teeth want to do without a retainer.

I can tell you many people were dissatisfied with their few chiropractic "treatments" after feeling fine, when the pain came back a week or so later after they quit. It just needs more time for the body to get stronger to hold the alignments.

Anywhoo, yes, when everything is operating at its best, we are likely to feel our best, mind and body. ADHD included. It's not just about feeling better, it's about allowing the nerves and the blood flow to go where they need to be.

blueroo
06-27-08, 06:10 AM
Sorry Smitten, I thought you already had undergone treatment with a chiropractor.....

But, to second your citations, and what MECMR said, after working for a chiropractic clinic for nearly 10 years and treating all sorts of age groups and ailments, we saw a lot of not only specific conditions improve, some life long, but whole body and mind healing as well. We had a large patient base of children as well, and they respond extremely well to the treatments in general.

One of the questions that came up here was a frequency of treatment. I just wanted to add that chiropractic is not a quick fix by any means, because it is dealing with the soft tissues of the musculature, there is no "brace" or "cast" or "pin" to hold the weak areas in place until they become stronger and adjust to their more proper positions. Even someone with braces on their teeth have to have them in place for a long time, and they need to be kept in place when complete through retention. That is another reason why after chiropractic treatment, they often recommend maintenance treatments to correct any natural tendencies of the spine and soft tissues to adjust back to the improper alignment, just as teeth want to do without a retainer.

I can tell you many people were dissatisfied with their few chiropractic "treatments" after feeling fine, when the pain came back a week or so later after they quit. It just needs more time for the body to get stronger to hold the alignments.

Anywhoo, yes, when everything is operating at its best, we are likely to feel our best, mind and body. ADHD included. It's not just about feeling better, it's about allowing the nerves and the blood flow to go where they need to be.

I don't mean to be contrary, but there is a big problem with using your statements as data in support of chiropractic medicine. There is no way to define a failure and a success. The work and its results are entirely subjective. That alone makes it very difficult to consider chiropractic medicine a valid science. Without the ability to objectively define and measure results, it can not be science.

Any improvement, no matter how great or slight, is marked as a success for the chiropractic procedure they used. Any failure to improve, or decline in the patient's condition, is not marked as a failure for chiropractic medicine. Instead the responsibility for the failure is passed along to the patient for not staying the course with the treatment. This is very convenient for chiropractic medicine. In always taking credit for all success, and always denying fault for any failure, it can never lose.

Chiropractic medicine might be useful for ADHD, or it might not be. Because it can't be scientifically tested, we can't be sure. There are no double-blind and controlled studies to show either way, and I'm doubtful that there can be.

I have a question for supporters of chiropractic medicine though. If a perfectly healthy person were to walk into a clinic, would the DC examine them and find no problems? Or would the DC somehow manage to find a problem to correct? Are there any people who will be turned away from chiropractic therapy because they don't need it?

Smitten79
06-27-08, 09:12 AM
Chiropractic medicine might be useful for ADHD, or it might not be. Because it can't be scientifically tested, we can't be sure. There are no double-blind and controlled studies to show either way, and I'm doubtful that there can be.


Blueroo have a look at the first 7 (+ another two anecdotal reports) posts in this thread for 'scientific evidence'. Oh but that's not enough for you?:confused:

Thank you so much for the feedback Frazzle and MECMR.;)

I think like a lot of treatments for ADHD, it will work for some (it will go to the 'root of their problems') and it won't work so well for others (where that particular issue isn't the 'root problem').

It requires a lot of time, patience, and obviously monetary investment as well - a lot of people would rather get an instant solution of taking a pill which not only 'cures their ills for a few hours' but is actually 'medically approved' treatment for ADHD.

I think people would be far better off to spend a bit of time and money experimenting with things and trying to get to the root cause of their problem and spinal problems maybe one root cause.

I am curious as to whether people reading this thread (who have ADHD) have even minor Kyphosis (http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&q=kyphosis&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi (http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&q=kyphosis&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi)). Me and my mother (who is also ADHD) both have some mild Kyphosis - I wonder whether this could predict whether Chiropractic treatment would therefore be addressing a root cause for us (not that I have started it yet)? I guess a proper Chiropractic examination would be necessary to see if the area in the spine associated with ADHD is problematic on me for example...

Also does anyone have any experience with the specific technique used in Yannick Pauli's Adult ADHD study from last year - Network Spinal Analysis? I wonder if there is something about that technique that may be particularly beneficial for ADHD...

FrazzleDazzle
06-27-08, 07:00 PM
I have a question for supporters of chiropractic medicine though. If a perfectly healthy person were to walk into a clinic, would the DC examine them and find no problems? Or would the DC somehow manage to find a problem to correct? Are there any people who will be turned away from chiropractic therapy because they don't need it?

Bluroo, I cannot speak for other doctors, but the ones I worked for did in fact turn people away if there were no subluxations. They always took x-rays, and those can be seen on radiographs. But, it wasn't often when someone with no issues came in. ;) They were usually a family member or friend of a patient who just wanted to get a check.

And, I was not submitting data, scientific or otherwise, only sharing experience, anecdotal as it is, with you guys. As far as I know, posting on ADDForums is not liken to submitting papers for scientific review. :p

However, visit notes and exam findings include more that only subjective findings. There is the standard of documentation used by providers of all fields (for legal and insurance purposes as well) called SOAP notes, which include "subjective" "objective" "assessment" and "plan." The objective part would include exam findings on each visit, and any changes for better or worse noted there, and there are a slew of standard tests used by chiropractors that providers of all disciplines (all the way from neurologists to physical therapists) use to establish baseline and track progress, so that objectivity is DEFINITELY there. Chiropractors by law and the governing entities that control all licensed physicians of all specialties have to abide by the same stringent record-keeping as medical doctors do, as well. So, don't go into a chiropractor's office and expect anything less than you would from a medical doctor's office except the specialty of treatment.

At first, as a VERY skeptic patient of chiropractic care for a long-term work injury, before I started working there, doc would show me along the way the exam findings and x-rays so I could see the improvements, not just "feel" them. That, and the long-time pain I was in was treated and relieved, even to this day. That was over 20 years ago.

Smitten, I will ask doc about the kyphosis thing on my son and I for you, and report back. :-)

Smitten79
06-27-08, 10:18 PM
Smitten, I will ask doc about the kyphosis thing on my son and I for you, and report back. :-)

Thanks Frazzle look forward to it.
I am not sure exactly whether the Kyphosis is something (both me and my mum) have had from birth or whether it is simply a result of bad posture habits (for me sitting slouched at a desk often partly because I was had some uncorrected vision problems and needed to be up close to read, carrying heavy and uncomfortable school bags, etc)...
Anyway would love to know if the Kyphosis could be related to the ADHD as noone else in my immediate family definitely has ADHD and noone else looks like they have even mild Kyphosis (as opposed to my mum and me).

Your doc/chiropractor, of course isn't going to be an all-knowing 'sage' on the subject but I'm curious if in their experience they have seen a correlation between some kind of Cervical Kyphosis and ADHD symptoms - and when the people with the Cervical Kyphosis have that particular problem improved through treatment their cognitive abilities/behavioural problems/ADHD symptoms improve too...

Here is one case study on the matter from earlier in the thread...

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3987/is_200411/ai_n9462763
Cervical kyphosis is a possible link to ADHD

Dynamic Chiropractic (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3987), Nov 18, 2004 (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3987/is_200411) by Bastecki, Anthony V (http://findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qa=Bastecki%2C+Anthony+V), Harrison, Deed E (http://findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qa=Harrison%2C+Deed+E), Haas, Jason W (http://findarticles.com/p/search?tb=art&qa=Haas%2C+Jason+W)

Objective: To discuss the case of a patient diagnosed with ADHD by a general practitioner and then treated with chiropractic care.

<!-- google_ad_section_end (name=s1) --><!-- google_ad_section_start (name=s2 weight=.3) -->Clinical Features: A 5-year-old patient was diagnosed with ADHD and treated by a pediatrician unsuccessfully with Methylphenidate (Ritalin), Adderol, and Haldol for 3 years. The patient received 35 treatments over the course of 8 weeks. A change from a 12-degree C2-C7 kyphosis to a 32degree C2-C7 lordosis was observed at post-treatment. During chiropractic care, the child's facial tics resolved and his behavior vastly improved. After 27 chiropractic visits, the child's pediatrician stated that the child no longer exhibited symptoms of ADHD. The changes in structure and function may be related to the correction of cervical kyphosis.

Conclusion: The patient experienced significant reduction in symptoms. Additionally, the medical doctor concluded that the reduction in symptoms was significant enough to discontinue the medication. There may be a possible connection such that correction of cervical kyphosis in patients with ADHD may produce a desirable clinical outcome.
Key Indexing Terms: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Cervical Traction; Chiropractic Manipulation.
Anthony V. Bastecki, DC; Deed E. Harrison, DC; Jason W. Haas, DC
<!-- google_ad_section_end (name=s2) -->Copyright Dynamic Chiropractic Nov 18, 2004
Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning Company. All rights Reserved

meadd823
06-28-08, 05:41 AM
I can do the scientific studies normally but I think I will have to wing it on logic because the HTML coding corrections fried my brain -

I do understand nerve impulses and such travel up and down the spine and such but this does really explain the variations of ADD expressions and the inconsistenceis in focusing - umm able to hyper focus, then unable to focus -

Stimulation and such but becoming anxious is also stimulating and it doesn't have the same effects as say a subject of interest like Chiropractic treatment of ADHD yet some of the same neurochemicals will be traveling up the same set of nerves in the same spine .

I have gone for Chiropractic treatment - and it does help with many things like head aches muscle tension ect and although pain will screw with one attention span no doubt about it I have been hyperactive sense before birth and I have a hard time believing that while developing in the womb my spine was out of alignment - My mom thought I was going to be a huge foot ball player type boy I kicked wiggled and squirmed - every one was surprised I was a girl {I was born before sonagrams} My point I was hyperactive in the womb . . . . .

Imnapl
06-28-08, 11:38 AM
- a lot of people would rather get an instant solution of taking a pill which not only 'cures their ills for a few hours' but is actually 'medically approved' treatment for ADHD.I find this statement offensive coming from someone who is supposed to have ADHD/ADD.

I think people would be far better off to spend a bit of time and money experimenting with things and trying to get to the root cause of their problemSmitten79, of all the alternative therapies you have tried so far, which would you say has been the most effective.

theta
06-28-08, 01:19 PM
It requires a lot of time, patience, and obviously monetary investment as well - a lot of people would rather get an instant solution of taking a pill which not only 'cures their ills for a few hours' but is actually 'medically approved' treatment for ADHD.


Not everyone here is a bias pharmaceutical sales representative promoting drugs. :) I'm taking supplements that are all naturally occurring in the body.
No cows are sacred on this site in my opinion and chiropractic treatment of ADHD is naturally going to be meet with off the charts skepticism
by even people opposed to drugs.

Impulsivity is the inverse of patiences. Impulsivity is far more debilitating than inattention. "a lot of time, patience" treatment approach to impulsivity by definitions is likely to result in a very high drop out rate. And those who can stick with it likely have lower impulsivity.

Then your left with the spine effecting attention. I have a theory that a lot of things can treat inattention(which also explains why I think impulsivity is a much greater problem). Maybe not by actually improving working memory
but the methods still increases alertness by some other mechanisms. That subjectively a person can label as ability to focus. Chiropractic treatment might
very well be one of those things. But how would it compare to say a study in which people got real Chiropractic treatment and a mock treatment? Mock treatment applies to placebo effect.

http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/9804/01/therapeutic.touch/

A 9 year old girl made the history books as the youngest person to get her study published in which she debunks therapeutic touch. Not to be confused with chiropractic treatment . But it shows how you could test chiropractic treatments efficay for ADHD.

You can see her as an adult on Penn & Teller: Bull$hit! :New Age Medicine June 26, 2008. Will likely appear on youtube in the future.

The placebo effect is quite powerful and real. I had a massive headache one day and I theorised it was undoubtedly due to low potassium from excessive caffeine use. The headache went away as I was mixing the potassium citrate! Thats how much I believed it would work. In that sense I do feel guilt telling someone that xyz treatment is likely bogus. Because I might be destroying what little efficacy it may have.

meadd823
06-29-08, 07:04 AM
but we all can't live forever -

First and foremost debating is a civilized activity of the intellectual kind - it is designed to help all further their understand the many perspectives any given subject can generate.


I have had chiropractic treatment for back injuries - I have had good results with this treatment but I have not ever experiences any noticeable changes in my ADD symptoms Increase in my sex drive yes improvement my ADD symptoms no.



Anywhoo, yes, when everything is operating at its best, we are likely to feel our best, mind and body. ADHD included. It's not just about feeling better, it's about allowing the nerves and the blood flow to go where they need to be.

When nerves are pinched then they give off a sensation - tingling and such when blood flow is slowed enough to cause tissue damage not does the area turn a nice blue color there is usually throbbing and such

Our bodies are designed to let us know when these things are happening. We automatically turn in our sleep due to this process - few of us ever even wake up - does this mean turning over at night is abnormal????

Shouldn't manipulation of a child spine undergo as much scrutiny by parents as beginning medication??? I mean if the adjustment have such a profound effect then there should be some black box warnings


If some thing is very profound in a good way it can have the opposite effect and end up going in an equally bad way -

Blueroo have a look at the first 7 (+ another two anecdotal reports) posts in this thread for 'scientific evidence'. Oh but that's not enough for you


I do try to behave - I have tried to stay out of these things but it alway bugs me when one feels the need to bash medications in an effort to promote their alternative treatment -

I do not understand why most feel this need to do it but few if any have managed to be able to educate the ADD population regarding their alternative approach without taking a swipe and either medications, those taking medications or the medication manufacturing companies

What to share your altrernative meadd823 free

1) Don't claim a cure

2) Don't bash medications or spew conspiracy theories

3) Try to post on my vacations




It is alarmist and unprofessional considering the scientific evidence to the contrary - thing like the quote below draw me into these discussions.


.
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects millions of Americans -- adults as well as children. By definition, ADHD is a neurologically based disorder and should, therefore, be treated by the experts in functional neurological disorders: doctors of chiropractic.
The drug Ritalin has not been tested for long-term side-effects or for any withdrawal-related complications, yet it is routinely given to individuals diagnosed with ADHD.

At best, Ritalin is simply masking the underlying neurological dysfunction associated with ADHD without doing anything to help ascertain a cure. Unfortunately, at its worst, the drug may be destroying the lives of millions of children. I find neither extreme appealing.


I find scare tactics annoying in case any one is taking a pole.


I may be Dolly Pardon but are you going to bet your child's future on a mayb?e

My counter


Exhibit A

Not treating ADD may increase the chances for substance abuse

Does Stimulant Therapy of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Beget Later Substance Abuse? A Meta-analytic Review of the Literature
(http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/111/1/179?ijkey=6fa27bdaf423014bf1a291a71ce52b0f0eb22bf3&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha)

* Clinical Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
{ddagger} Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

-> Objective.Concerns exist that stimulant therapy of youths with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may result in an increased risk for subsequent substance use disorders (SUD). We investigated all long-term studies in which pharmacologically treated and untreated youths with ADHD were examined for later SUD outcomes.

{Please note how objective is written - properly, subject could be re-visited later}

results.Six studies—2 with follow-up in adolescence and 4 in young adulthood—were included and comprised 674 medicated subjects and 360 unmedicated subjects who were followed at least 4 years. The pooled estimate of the odds ratio indicated a 1.9-fold reduction in risk for SUD in youths who were treated with stimulants compared with youths who did not receive pharmacotherapy for ADHD (z = 2.1; 95% confidence interval for odds ratio [OR]: 1.1–3.6). We found similar reductions in risk for later drug and alcohol use disorders (z = 1.1).

Conclusion.Our results suggest that stimulant therapy in childhood is associated with a reduction in the risk for subsequent drug and alcohol use disorders.
{End Quote}

~underling mine~

The right to be medicated - Exhibit B

Chiropractic presentation is all about promoting chiropractic care. Notice how many times this guys says educate about chiropractic medicine -

Probably the best way to begin helping an individual with ADHD, or their parents, is by educating them -- not about ADHD, but about chiropractic.

A good starting point is to make sure they understand that chiropractic doesn't treat ADHD. Instead, inform them that chiropractic's goal is to treat the underlying cause of ADHD.
{again Scientific evidence for this claim is lacking in his paper}

Once the involved individuals understand the value of a treatment that addresses the cause of ADHD, the doctor should further educate them regarding chiropractic.

Quite simply, it is important to teach people that "subluxations" are structural misalignments that cause neurological dysfunctions, and that the specific purpose of chiropractic is to identify and eliminate such subluxations.

~Underling Text color change added by me for emphasis~


This is a single paragraph - please educate NOT about ADD but about chiropractic -

Any of you suffering from lack of chiropractic education? Has this lack of chiropractic education gotten you fired from jobs for frequent tardies, caused multiple kitchen fires due to forgetfulness or loss of friend from telling them what you really think about that new hair do. ...

Okay this guy obviously doesn't need any help from me - {the feingold lady was better}



Exhibit C

ADHD is genetic - I am unsure how alignment is going to run in families but chromosomes sure do

{quote}An interesting gender preference for inheriting the disorder. Trinity College, Ireland, has found 3 genetic ties to ADHD, all having to do with dopamine levels. Dopamine receptors, the dopamine transporter genes and genes responsible for synthesis of dopamine are all linked to the disorder. The study also found that the ADHD responsible genes tend to come from the father's genetic make-up more so than the mother's genes. Kirley, A. et al. (2002). Neuropsychopharmacology, vol 27(4), 607-619.{End Quote}


If you would prefer to go have a manipulation done to your back side as a treatment for your ADD - by all means knock your self out. It isn't alternative therapies themselves that often generate "heat" in communities like this one - it is the crap that those presenting these alternative therapies place in their educational postings

I have problems with crap like the quote copied below. I am here challenging this therapy because of things like this not because I sit up and worry about how other ADDF members choose to treat their condition - I have my own to deal with.

Exhibit D

Promoting chiropractic therapy by use of unsubstantiated scare tactics {how unprofessional} I am refuting their claims but I am not spreading misinformation about chiropractic medicine - I have no need to


These children, along their parents and teachers, need to be educated regarding the dangers of Ritalin and also about the power of chiropractic. Ultimately, all children should be able to experience the joy of a well-adjusted body.

Let me see if I can help with the power here -

Exhibit E

ADD is a brain difference but not necessarily a spinal one

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/news/20031120/brain-imaging-targets-adhd-differences]Differences in Both Sides of Brain

Investigators at UCLA used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare the brains of 27 children with ADHD to those of 46 children without the disorder. They found that the region of the brain associated with attention and impulse control, located on the bottom of the frontal lobes of the brain, was smaller in the ADHD kids than in the other children.

"We would expect that the abnormalities would be in this region, and this is what we found," lead investigator Elizabeth Sowell, PhD, tells WebMD.

The researchers also found that children with ADHD had larger areas of the outer layers of the brain.

Previous research has indicated that the differences were limited to the right side of the brain, but Sowell and colleagues found that they occurred on both sides.
{End Quote}

Exhibit F

Lets have a look at these horrible effects of ADD medication this chiropractor dude is going on about

How Ritalin Works In Brain To Boost Cognition, Focus Attention (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080624115956.htm)

When they listened to individual PFC neurons, the scientists found that while cognition-enhancing doses of Ritalin had little effect on spontaneous activity, the neurons' sensitivity to signals coming from the hippocampus increased dramatically. Under higher, stimulatory doses, on the other hand, PFC neurons stopped responding to incoming information.

"This suggests that the therapeutic effects of Ritalin likely stem from this fine-tuning of PFC sensitivity," says Berridge. "You're improving the ability of these neurons to respond to behaviorally relevant signals, and that translates into better cognition, attention and working memory." Higher doses associated with drug abuse and cognitive impairment, in contrast, impair functioning of the PFC.

More intriguing still were the results that came from tuning into the entire chorus of neurons at once. When groups of neurons were already "singing" together strongly, Ritalin reinforced this coordinated activity. At the same time, the drug weakened activity that wasn't well coordinated to begin with. All of this suggests that Ritalin strengthens dominant and important signals within the PFC, while lessening weaker signals that may act as distractors, says Berridge.

"These results show a new level of action for cognition-enhancing doses of Ritalin that couldn't have been predicted from single neuron analyses," he says.
{End Quote}


Exhibit G

The results of not medicating children

Study Finds ADHD Meds Don't Affect Brain Size (http://www.additudemag.com/adhd-web/article/590.html)

The study compared 152 children and adolescents with ADHD and 139 children without the disorder, matched for sex and age. Most of the children with ADHD were medicated, but 49 of the children had never been treated. The brains of the unmedicated group did not differ significantly from the medicated group, except for the white matter, which makes up about 50% of total brain tissue. The white matter was smaller in the unmedicated group.


"In fact, findings were generally as striking for the unmedicated patients with ADHD as for those who were being treated with medications, and were more pronounced for white matter volumes," the study says. "Thus, our analyses show that decreased brain volumes in ADHD in both white and gray matter compartments are not due to drug treatment. Conversely, we have no evidence that stimulant drugs cause abnormal brain development," it says.
{End Quote}

This should serve as a serve as an over view of my disagreements

meadd823
06-29-08, 07:17 AM
I understand many who chose alternative therapies feel like those of us who choose to take medications go about seeking to beat you into seeing things our way . ..

Maybe what some do not realize is that for the most part those of you who come to share alternative therapy presentations mange to get around to medication bashing, conspiracy theories and scare statics .Few if any who come here saying they want to share their alternative ADD treatment approach are able to do so without attacking the use of ADD medications.


The public at large knows very little about ADD and ADD medications. The press has done it’s usual job of screwing up the truth so there is a lot of people out there who know nothing about ADD, ADD medication and alternative therapies except what they here on the news.

Guys lawmakers that determine my ability to get proper medical treatment are part of that misinformed public who don't know squat – every time some one comes on here and repeats false information about ADD medications they spread ignorance and fear even further . . . .we always have as many visitors reading our post as we do registered members = public exposure.

Public opinion influences decisions made by governing bodies that determine weather or not I {and others like me} will be able to receive proper medical pharmaceutical treatment.


When you decide to post anti-medication propaganda you begin to endanger my freedom of choice. I do not appreciate my freedom to choose medication to treat my ADD being endangered so you can promote your therapy – That is crap and yeah this is me fighting back

Keep posting untrue crap about ADD medications – keep quoting scare tactics and lies and I will keep entering your threads and speaking the truth.

I would prefer a live and let live existence which is why I am taking this extra time to explain why I have entered into this thread. I do not want to cause any one harm but I am not going to sit by and say nothing while fear, confusion and false hood are being promoted in a place I come to for support. This is my home community . . . .


I didn’t learn the art of debate because I wanted to I did so out of a need to protect my freedoms – stop spreading anti-medication propaganda, and I will be more than happy to direct my energies else where . ..

FrazzleDazzle
06-30-08, 10:56 PM
Smitten, my son and I visited with our chiropractor today, and I asked him about the kyphosis ADHD connection. He said that not only do my son and I have that curvature, but all of his ADHD patients do have that as a peculiarity as well, and he is aware of the connections in the studies as well. On a side note, he also mentioned that every single person he adjusts that has depression has a C1 vertebral subluxation. Just saying.....making a connection is all.

Imnapl
06-30-08, 11:23 PM
Smitten, my son and I visited with our chiropractor today, and I asked him about the kyphosis ADHD connection. He said that not only do my son and I have that curvature, but all of his ADHD patients do have that as a peculiarity as well, and he is aware of the connections in the studies as well. On a side note, he also mentioned that every single person he adjusts that has depression has a C1 vertebral subluxation. Just saying.....making a connection is all.FD, when did your chiropractor first diagnose your kyphosis?

livinginchaos
06-30-08, 11:46 PM
I've never ever had chiropractic care. I'd be interested in learning what it's helping you all with, personal experiences of what you notice the differences are with your ADHD.

FrazzleDazzle
07-01-08, 12:32 AM
LC, my son was adjusted since the day he was born, so I don't have a baseline of pre- and post-treatment opinions. I can definitely tell when it's been too long between adjustments though for both of us. I actually realized today, and after mulling over this thread, that it's been a while since I've been in, and have been noticing some sloppy thinking as of last week. DC did work a lot on my neck today, and I'm hoping that will help the fog, I will know better tomorrow. Yawn......I wish I had better anectodal stuff for ya.

Pretty much the same for me.....I was adjusted before ADHD became a term in my family, and what took me in, in the first place, was a work injury. I didn't ask, but am sure the kyphosis (likely very mild, as I was not aware of a pronounced curve), as well as a mild scoliosis was discovered on my initial exam and from the initial full spine radiographs he took. I do know that I am much healthier otherwise overall since I have been adjusted now, for nearly 20 years, but can't say I have a baseline for any ADHD (?innattentive) I may have been blessed with since I wasn't paying attention to that apect, and I have been doing a lot of other things to clean up my act over the years, and it has all played a part in my health and mental recovery. Cure? No. Improve? Yes. Clear as mud? :-)

While I was working for my doc, I recall very strongly two young lads with very pronounced "H" ADHD who responded very well to the chiropractic treatments, and very shortly showed a calmer demeaner, espcially when they were in the office! LOL!

meadd823
07-01-08, 06:44 AM
I would like to see the connection between mal- alignment exercise and ADD seeing that exercise decreases ADD symptoms but only for a short time but regular vigorous exercise assist in ADD management over all . Wouldn't vigorous physical exercise especially weight lifting aggravate a misalignment?

I do not know all that much about spinal misalignment but I do know exercise combo of aerobic and strength training improves my mood and decreases my need for medication to a moderate extent – I can see where the aerobic exercise would possibly be okay but not the strength training

PS this is a real question.







He said that not only do my son and I have that curvature, but all of his ADHD patients do have that as a peculiarity as well, and he is aware of the connections in the studies as well. On a side note, he also mentioned that every single person he adjusts that has depression has a C1 vertebral subluxation. Just saying.....making a connection is all.

Got pics - that would be cool to see - try out that new camera lens -LOL!

Seriously pics of this difference would be cool though


I have a question for supporters of chiropractic medicine though. If a perfectly healthy person were to walk into a clinic, would the DC examine them and find no problems? Or would the DC somehow manage to find a problem to correct? Are there any people who will be turned away from chiropractic therapy because they don't need it?

There is such a thing as completion of treatments - normally the treatments begin pretty close together and then gradually become further and further apart as misalignment are fewer and fewer to non-existent.

Few if any perfectly health people walk any doctors office seeking treatment chiropractors are no different in this aspect

The placebo effect is quite powerful and real. I had a massive headache one day and I theorised it was undoubtedly due to low potassium from excessive caffeine use. The headache went away as I was mixing the potassium citrate! Thats how much I believed it would work. In that sense I do feel guilt telling someone that xyz treatment is likely bogus. Because I might be destroying what little efficacy it may have.

Then why do it?

To what end if all you are doing is destroying some one's belief in their relief.

Tell me what portion of life isn't a perception?? -

Is not science mere perception of observation ?

I first went to see a chiropractor back when Columbus first discovered the Americas due to a back injury from an auto accident because surgery would have decreased my physical agility not to mention the initial movement limitation which hyperactive ADDers tolerate notoriously poorly


Chiropractors have been around possibly that long – spinal adjustments are not new.



ut how would it compare to say a study in which people got real Chiropractic treatment and a mock treatment? Mock treatment applies to placebo effect.

How would one scientifically study the effects of the mock adjustment???? Mock treatment sounds like it alone would cause problems - I mean to misalign some one spine purposely would be unethical and to misalign one spine with out the chiropractor knowing he was misaligning it isn't possible and if they let some uneducated baffone do the adjustments are you going to sign up for this possibility??? I know it isn't the line I would get in I have enough problems

Theta have you never been to a chiropractor? I have and in all honesty it would be extremely difficult if not flat out impossible to "fake" a spinal adjustment with out running an extremely high risk of causing harm - this is why I left the double blinded placebo thing alone - there is simply no way this could be ethically done to humans . . . .the spinal adjustments are real I felt the adjustments as they were being done - I didn't believe in it either back 100 years ago but I really really didn't want spinal surgery - My grandfather recommended this approach and my grandfather was a man of sceince

The chiropractor knew exactly where all the trouble spots were even the ones I didn't tell him about

That is the only way I could see doing a double blinded study is have people with and with out spinal malformations go in for an examination . . .but that still wouldn't tell us much about the connection between spinal alignment and ADD<---- which by the way this the topic of this thread

meadd823
07-01-08, 07:22 AM
I've never ever had chiropractic care. I'd be interested in learning what it's helping you all with, personal experiences of what you notice the differences are with your ADHD.

I am more comfortable being ADD and if any thing I sleep a heck of a lot better - I have a screwed up neck I tell people my head isn't screwed on right - but any way adjustments do help in stopping virtually all of my tension headaches and does wonders for my insomnia - which does improve memory and concentration however I am still ADD but I admittedly I am not good at being regular - I do not think about going until I am uncomfortable and unable to sleep

Having my neck out of alignment resembles bipolar more than ADD - I can't sleep can't sleep can't sleep my arms go numb wakes me up so if I do sleep it isn't for very long until I am so exhausted from insomnia I crash like my kitten -

livinginchaos
07-03-08, 02:34 AM
I am more comfortable being ADD and if any thing I sleep a heck of a lot better - I have a screwed up neck I tell people my head isn't screwed on right - but any way adjustments do help in stopping virtually all of my tension headaches and does wonders for my insomnia - which does improve memory and concentration however I am still ADD but I admittedly I am not good at being regular - I do not think about going until I am uncomfortable and unable to sleep

Having my neck out of alignment resembles bipolar more than ADD - I can't sleep can't sleep can't sleep my arms go numb wakes me up so if I do sleep it isn't for very long until I am so exhausted from insomnia I crash like my kitten -

Dang! perhaps I should check it out for my sleep. As you know, my sleep is horrible, whether it's not being able to fall asleep, stay asleep or fall into a deep sleep.

meadd823
07-03-08, 06:52 PM
Dang! perhaps I should check it out for my sleep. As you know, my sleep is horrible, whether it's not being able to fall asleep, stay asleep or fall into a deep sleep.

I have found adjustments helps me tremendously and I don't have to take no darn sleeping pills. I don't get along with sleeping pills much better than I do antidepressants Sleeping pills seem to either make me eat compulsively or if they do put me to sleep I get a hang over effect the next day. I know some people do well with them for some reason I do things like eat canned spinach cold straight out of the can - ever eaten cold beats? That would be my restoril experience -

Being hyper is bad enough being hyper and unable to sleep is unbearable {especially for those who have to put up with me} - I am still ADD but the improved sleep for me helps my ADD memory symptoms not to mention my mood.

In my experience that is how chiropractic adjustment have helped my ADD - I have been hyper sense before birth and I do not loose that even when I am, in "alignment" but I do sleep better because I am able to actually get comfortable long enough to sleep. . .thus all my questions are for real.

I don't like medication bashing but I was never against the chiropractic field itself. I have been myself and even recommended it to Gary for his back pain. Gary is always lifting wrong or twisting while trying to lift.

Gary is a recovering addict and will NOT do pills for any rhythm or reason so being able to find relief for his back pain with out mood or mind altering drugs was right up his alley. It took him a couple of sessions but his back and leg pain did go away. . . he was even more hyper but he was less grouchy about it. To me being very active is just biologically natural for some folks but that is my personal opinion.

Imnapl
07-03-08, 07:08 PM
Chiropractics are good for sciatica.

Kunga Dorji
02-07-11, 05:49 AM
Thanks Frazzle look forward to it.
I am not sure exactly whether the Kyphosis is something (both me and my mum) have had from birth or whether it is simply a result of bad posture habits (for me sitting slouched at a desk often partly because I was had some uncorrected vision problems and needed to be up close to read, carrying heavy and uncomfortable school bags, etc)...
Anyway would love to know if the Kyphosis could be related to the ADHD as noone else in my immediate family definitely has ADHD and noone else looks like they have even mild Kyphosis (as opposed to my mum and me).

Your doc/chiropractor, of course isn't going to be an all-knowing 'sage' on the subject but I'm curious if in their experience they have seen a correlation between some kind of Cervical Kyphosis and ADHD symptoms - and when the people with the Cervical Kyphosis have that particular problem improved through treatment their cognitive abilities/behavioural problems/ADHD symptoms improve too...



A late reply but:

1) Thanks for all the articles and case reports. I am actively collecting info on this subject. My take on all this is that I have been pleasantly surprised by the quality of the research I have seen from chiropractors on this subject.

2) I do think though that some of them have been sucked in to an overly anti medication stance. The bottom line is- we need to have many options available to us for treatment, and medication is very helpful for many of us. Many alternative type practitioners do get sucked in to a state of unnecessary opposition to medications, and often express views that are less well supported than their opinions on their area of expertise.

3) I had a subluxation of my atlas on my skull treated on 31/12/2009 with a novel technique called Atlas Profilax.
Unlike chiropractic treatments this treatment works in one session - not requiring a series of treatments. It is also a more gentle treatment than some chiropractic treatments.
I experienced immediate improvement in all my ADHD symptoms. The improvement continued when I started mindfulness treatment and Pilates.
These combined treatments fully corrected my posture ( recovery had been limited by muscle memory of bad posture, and by muscular weakness and shortening secondary to my chronic poor posture.)
By 6 weeks after the end of the mindfulness training ( and 6 months after the Atlas treatment) I was able to cease all medication - having been on dexamphetamine 50mg/d.

4) As a doctor with a very personal interest in ADHD- I have a good understanding of anatomy more recently and the subject of sensorimotor psychology.

My take on why the treatment works is
- the subluxation causes poor posture and pain.
- pain limits attentiveness in itself.
- neck pain worsens sleep for many sufferers- further compromising sleep.
- the pain causes restlessness
- vascular supply to the alertness centre in the brain - the reticular activating system(vertebral artery)- is compromised by this problem.
- venous drainage of the brain is compromised by the compression of the internal jugular vein against the front of the cervical spine.
( the compromise to my cerebral blood flow was documented on a SPECT scan)
- the sympathetic nervous system is stimulated by the neck posture- so also causing agitation and mental restlessness
- the sympathetic stimulation also compromises sleep

Now this is all reasoned by sitting down with a skull and some neck bones and looking at 3 D reconstructions of neck anatomy.

I am sure from my own assessments that this problem is very common, and equally sure that there is no way it can help anybody's attention.

However other posters are right- this will take ages to research.
It is difficult to get agreement on objective measures of attention (maybe using a rating scale like Jasper Goldberg in a serial manner might be appropriate).

Equally some of the physiological measures would be hard to assess- but maybe some biometric approach could be devised, coupled with measures of say cortisol levels.

However _ I think it is worth flagging this issue and particularly the Atlas Profilax treatment as something that ADHD patients should think about and assess for themselves.

It was quite a step for me as an allopathic doctor to step so far out of my comfort zone. It is also another big step for me to be so outspoken in my enthusiasm for the technique.I am confident, though, that my own courage was rewarded.

I have posted more details on my blog- but beware - the pages are out of order- and I am not entirely sure how to fix it.

blueroo
02-07-11, 01:53 PM
Barliman,

Thanks for the insightful post. Since you are now advocating specific treatments with the assertion that you are a licensed physician, effectively practicing medicine, you should break your semi-anonymous profile and make your personal information available as other doctors on the forum have. Thanks!

Kunga Dorji
02-08-11, 04:38 AM
Barliman,

Thanks for the insightful post. Since you are now advocating specific treatments with the assertion that you are a licensed physician, effectively practicing medicine, you should break your semi-anonymous profile and make your personal information available as other doctors on the forum have. Thanks!

This is a difficult point to resolve in a way that would not cause my medical defence organistion to crucify me!

My observations about the atlas are based on my personal experience plus about 300 odd patient observations ( not all ADD by any means. ) On top of this I have read extensively and do have formal training in anatomy and physiology.

When I see patients I refer them to the atlas document I have on my blog and tell them they must read it and make up their own mind about the procedure- because I do not yet have the weight of consensus behind me.
This is not easy- I think it would actually be unethical and dishonest of me not to report my experience, and also inappropriate for me not to indicate that I do have the training to process this information in an informed and rational manner.

However all I can do is put out my take on the information and let people make their own decision. The consensus of my profession is not yet behind my observations.

I am talking with a friend about establishing a personal website- some what like Dr Charles Parker's one.

It will have 3 main areas of activity: ADHD, The atlas, and formal criticisms of corporatism and groupthink in the Medical Profession. It may not win me many friends- so I am treading carefully while I refine my ideas here.

I am finishing a case report for publication in the BMJ case reports. When that is done I will link to it with my personal details obviously included on the case report.

I have also had a number of letters published in Australian Medical publications- If I can link t them I will. Meantime- if you want confirmation of who I am - please PM me.

simbella
02-12-11, 09:42 PM
My daughter started seeing a Chiropractor over 2 years ago for something not related to ADHD. When she was diagnosed with ADHD shortly after we started seeing her the Chiropractor started adjusting her for that. Unfortunately, I don't see any changes with her ADHD symptoms, but we continue to go monthly for her other problem (which we haven't had any issues with, but don't want to come back either) and I figure being adjusted can't hurt anyway...maybe it is helping her ADHD somehow (even though I doubt it)

Kunga Dorji
02-13-11, 09:05 PM
My daughter started seeing a Chiropractor over 2 years ago for something not related to ADHD. When she was diagnosed with ADHD shortly after we started seeing her the Chiropractor started adjusting her for that. Unfortunately, I don't see any changes with her ADHD symptoms, but we continue to go monthly for her other problem (which we haven't had any issues with, but don't want to come back either) and I figure being adjusted can't hurt anyway...maybe it is helping her ADHD somehow (even though I doubt it)

There are a couple of worthwhile points to make here.
Firstly- ADHD causation is almost certainly multifactorial and complex. Fixing one problem like the neck might not be enough- but is likely to be beneficial.
I had a lot of bad habits of reaction to stress and had to unlearn those as well once my neck was fixed.
The other issue is that not all chiropractic treatments actually fix this problem of the subluxed atlas. Many just palliate it- which is why people need further adjustments.
What really surprised me about the Atlas Profilax treatment was their claim that they could fix the problem at the first session and had a very high success rate. I personally went into that treatment more with a "it seems safe enough so lets give it a go....fingers crossed!" type of attitude.
I was very pleasantly surprised that it actually worked first shot.

mctavish23
02-13-11, 09:29 PM
Doesn't work.

One of my good friends,who's also my chiropractor,have discussed this many times.

I swear by him when my back hurts,but I'd swear at him if he tried to treat ADHD

specifically.

He wouldn't btw, as he agrees with me.

Thanks for raising the question and the articles.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Kunga Dorji
02-14-11, 04:53 AM
I would like to see the connection between mal-alignment exercise and ADD seeing that exercise decreases ADD symptoms but only for a short time but regular vigorous exercise assist in ADD management over all . Wouldn't vigorous physical exercise especially weight lifting aggravate a misalignment?

John Ratey's data on the improvement of attention and mood with exercise is clear cut.
Looking back at this long history- I see very clearly how badly my fragile attention state went off when we computerised- and I spent much of the time when I would have been mobile face down on the internet insted of out there in the sun, working on my garden or walking my dogs.
Interestingly, now- with the neck fixed, keeping a comfortable, relaxed, correctly upright posture when computing is easy- even on the laptop that I am responding from right now.

I can look back and I was always better when fit. That is why I used to love skiing so much- it gave me a reason to stay fit in the winter. However - the worse I got- the worse the side effects I would get when I exercised- it got so bad in the end that there was nothing I could do without pain. Jogging was a nightmare- I would get this horrible headache at the base of my skull- and could not bear to go near exercise for a week after. I have run 8km and swum 3km and walked about 20km in the last week. No problemo- not now.



I do not know all that much about spinal misalignment but I do know exercise combo of aerobic and strength training improves my mood and decreases my need for medication to a moderate extent – I can see where the aerobic exercise would possibly be okay but not the strength training

PS this is a real question.

I know, and as always I appreciate the genuinely incisive questions you always ask. I am always totally confident with you meadd, that "what you see is what you get"- and I am not the only person who knows this.




How would one scientifically study the effects of the mock adjustment???? Mock treatment sounds like it alone would cause problems - I mean to misalign some one spine purposely would be unethical and to misalign one spine with out the chiropractor knowing he was misaligning it isn't possible and if they let some uneducated baffone do the adjustments are you going to sign up for this possibility??? I know it isn't the line I would get in I have enough problems


We run into the same problems with neurobiofeedback. Here is a problem with the way we do science that makes some questions so hard to achieve a meaningful answer to.
I don't know what the answer is here- but it is a serious question.Is there a flaw in our reliance on double blind, randomised trials?
You know that I think the answer is yes- but what do you think?



That is the only way I could see doing a double blinded study is have people with and with out spinal malformations go in for an examination . . .but that still wouldn't tell us much about the connection between spinal alignment and ADD<---- which by the way this the topic of this thread

Meadd- you have to understand that what I am arguing in my late intervention on this thread is that to a person who understands anatomy as it applies to real living, feeling, thinking , loving people, and has done a little training in sensorimotor psychology and issues of affective empathy
- the stuff that I am talking about is so obvious that it stands out like certain unmentionable parts of a male dog's anatomy.

When we train as doctors our anatomy is done on cold, rigid, formalin soaked corpses. The trouble with this is that so few of my colleagues make the leap of associating that 'textbook" knowledge with the real world.

i still do not understand how I got lucky enough to put this stuff together, but I am confident of my assessment. I am also confident that the logical steps I made in putting this all together can be replicated by anybody patient enough to read it and think. Despite our claims to a special superior knowledge as qualified health practitioners this is stuff that anybody with an inquiring mind and a functioning brain should be able to nut out for themselves.

Knowledge is not just that which is signed and sealed by the current authorities.

As always, thanks for your input. It is invariably positive.

Amtram
02-14-11, 10:07 AM
Years of chiropractic helped my back. That's it. And it still didn't help as much as physical therapy exercises, followed by more exercise as my mobility improved.

Kunga Dorji
02-14-11, 02:50 PM
Doesn't work.

One of my good friends,who's also my chiropractor,have discussed this many times.

I swear by him when my back hurts,but I'd swear at him if he tried to treat ADHD

specifically.

He wouldn't btw, as he agrees with me.

Thanks for raising the question and the articles.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Hi Robert

There are quite a list of case reports here. While a case report is not as solid evidence by and large as a double blind RCT, a well observed case report is still valuable evidence.

Secondly- there is now a specialist subsection of upper cervical chiropractors- who do get better results on the specific problem between the skull and the atlas- their website nucca.org has valuable information that is woth your examining. The technique I was treated with gets even better results with this problem.

Finally the real problem that contributes to the ADD is the head forwards position adopted by people with the atlas subluxation, especially when we are stressed or anxious.

That puts traction on the sympathetic nervous system, and activates it, and compresses the internal jugular vein against the upper cervical neck bones- and in my opinion that is the reason for the impaired cerebral blood flow shown in the abnormal SPECT scans seen in about 2/3 of ADD patients.

This sort of abnormal , head forwards posture, couple by habits like physically tensing up and pushing the head further forwards when trying to concentrate, are very common in ADHD patients- and in many other people who have problems with alertness, concentration, and explosive tempers.

Keep your eyes open for these physical signs, and just be aware of the idea that just because you have not seen results in this area that dos not mean there are newer developments coming up that you have not yet experienced.

The real catch is to appreciate that any successes in this area are totally dependent on learning new postural habits. These habits are virtually unlearnable with the joint between the skull and the atlas out of place- the geometry ot the spine simply does not allow sitting or standing with a level head and the anatomacally correct relationship between the head and the neck.

Our resting posture is meant to be such that when sitting or standing we can drop a plumb line from our external auditory canal, and have it pass though the centre of our shoulder and hip joints. When standing that line should also pass through the centre of the knees and ankles. Take a look- it is in all the anatomy textbooks.

Furthermore- when one studies the postural habits of people who are really calm ( and i would suggest Zen monks- as they are particularly fussy about posture)
you will find that the calmest people, the ones who reallly embody equanimity- maintain a relaxed but very upright posture even when exposed to potentially stressful situations.

We do not- we slouch if front of our computers, and we hunch up with our heads and necks forward when tense ( which is quite often when one has to live with the consequences of untreated ADHD 24/7!)

The trouble is- we have never had good treatments for all the minor neck and back pains and all the cases of scoliosis we see- and all attention is focussed on the micro level of medication, forgetting purely physical issues that arise from the shape of our body, and the shape that we keep it in.

This understanding of mine has simply slipped out of view in the modern world.