View Full Version : Not sure how this one is gonna fly here...


SuzzanneX
07-14-08, 06:09 PM
I found this website on "harm reduction" for amphedimines.

..........ALL AMPHEDIMINES.

TO ME, there is not responsible intelligent way to do meth.
..........it's like telling someone how to drink bleech responsibly.

they also cover ADHD meds..in fact that's what the link goes to.




http://www.speedsmart.org/index.php?page=150

SuzzanneX
07-14-08, 06:14 PM
...please, just delete this if it's of no use to this board.

I'm not trying to be wayward, or anything.
......it's seems on topic, and I found it interesting.

that's all.

Imnapl
07-14-08, 07:06 PM
Well, Suzi-Q, I've only checked out one of the links and I found this pertinent and interesting:

<table class="main" align="center" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="content">In the study, 500 adults who had been diagnosed with ADHD were matched for age and gender with 501 adults in the general population. In a 25-minute telephone interview, all the participants in the study were asked questions about school performance, substance abuse, driving records, use of tobacco, problems in the workplace, marital problems and problems with other relationships, their satisfaction with key aspects of their lives and their general outlook on life.
Participants in the study were evenly split between men and women. They were drawn from all over the country and included people from urban, suburban and rural areas. Of those with ADHD, about half had been diagnosed before they were 13 years old. More than one third (35 percent), however, had not been diagnosed until after age 18. Of those who had children, more than half reported that one or more of their children had also been diagnosed with ADHD. Only 36 percent of the adults with ADHD surveyed reported that they were taking a prescription medication for the disorder.


"These preliminary results underscore the importance of recognizing and understanding the problems faced by adults with ADHD," Dr. Biederman said. "It is striking that it appears that only about a third of those in the survey who have been diagnosed with ADHD are being treated appropriately. Better identification and treatment of adults with ADHD can improve lives and save Americans billions of dollars every year."

</td> <td class="div2">
</td></tr></tbody></table>

prtsimmons
07-15-08, 02:55 PM
I found this interesting, too:

"Only 36 percent of the adults with ADHD surveyed reported that they were taking a prescription medication for the disorder.


"These preliminary results underscore the importance of recognizing and understanding the problems faced by adults with ADHD," Dr. Biederman said. "It is striking that it appears that only about a third of those in the survey who have been diagnosed with ADHD are being treated appropriately. Better identification and treatment of adults with ADHD can improve lives and save Americans billions of dollars every year."


Basically, they are equating 'appropriate treatment' to medication. I don't have any objection to the idea of medication as an appropriate treatment, but I hardly think it is the only one. Even the most scrip-happy doctors recommend diet, exercise, cognitive therapy, coaching, etc.

I find it very disturbing that the only 'appropriate' treatment is a mind-altering chemical. I can't shake the feeling that we are gradually being brainwashed into thinking there is a pill for everything... and if you don't take your pill, you are socially unacceptable.

Mincan
07-15-08, 03:03 PM
The problem is in our mind... what good does non-mind stuff really able to help beyond general helpfulness in the general population.

Imnapl
07-15-08, 03:04 PM
I find it very disturbing that the only 'appropriate' treatment is a mind-altering chemical. I can't shake the feeling that we are gradually being brainwashed into thinking there is a pill for everything... and if you don't take your pill, you are socially unacceptable.The article is a scientific discussion. According to studies, medication works. It's been known for a long time that behavior management alone was not as successful as medication alone. The combination of medication and behavior therapy is a win, win situation for people who respond to medication.

I am definitely not brain washed and I forgave society a long time ago.

Maurice
07-15-08, 05:29 PM
I find it hard to imagine that the other 64% is going unmedicated! I certainly do not envy them.

Dizfriz
07-15-08, 05:32 PM
The article is a scientific discussion. According to studies, medication works. It's been known for a long time that behavior management alone was not as successful as medication alone. The combination of medication and behavior therapy is a win, win situation for people who respond to medication.

I am definitely not brain washed and I forgave society a long time ago.


I agree.

The giant MTA longitudinal study showed clearly that the single most effective thing you can do for adhd is medication. Overshadows any therapy: behavioral, cognitive and any other method you can think of (pretty much all were tried). This came as somewhat of a surprise to therapists but the evidence was clear. Therapy does have an effect but is nowhere near the power of medication. Therapy is quite useful but except in the milder cases not enough alone. Medication plus therapy is shown to be probably the best combination.

I am not fond of medicating kids either but the evidence is there and is clear. No one should take my word for it, check it out.

Dizfriz

Dizfriz

prtsimmons
07-15-08, 05:55 PM
I certainly am not saying that medication doesn't work, or that it isn't an appropriate treatment for ADD/ADHD. The article clearly equates 'appropriate treatment' with medication, however. It assumes that the 64% who are not medicated are not being treated and are not productive. Well, I have seen psychiatrists and MDs, and I have discussed my 'treatment' several times, and I made an informed decision (with the consultation of family and professionals) to not go on drugs. I have a decent job and numerous extracurricular activities and a fiancee and I am involved in a lot of creative and cooperative projects (some of them even get finished!). However, I am clearly not being 'effectively' treated because I am not on prescription drugs. (This is exactly what the article states: 36% of ADHD patients are being treated with drugs; the other 64% are NOT being treated effectively.)

The fact that medication is effective does not mean it is the only way to get the job done.

SuzzanneX
07-15-08, 06:10 PM
I was technically un medicated till i was 38.
.....I did'nt know I was ADHD and did meth, and for about 20 years
I was a functional addict.

I bet a big part of the "un medicated" are self medicating.

that's kinda what I thought might be taboo here is it's a "harm reduction" site
for addicts as well.

....personally, I could'nt read when I was in active addiction.
I could'nt absorb what i was reading.

I'm on 90% intuition now.

.....that's why my posting structure is weird to most people.

so i can read what i write.

Maurice
07-15-08, 07:46 PM
Yes there is always more than one way to get the job done.
I prefer to take the best proven course when I want to get the job. I got the job done for way to long and way too difficult doing it "my own way." I am very happy with the added heop that my meds give me. The difference is night and day. I also try not to knock something that I haven't tried.

newfdog
07-15-08, 09:53 PM
I went to the link and it appears the site is under construction..... W&F?

Imnapl
07-15-08, 10:25 PM
Here you go Newf.

I'll copy the whole article in case this link (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2004-09/ama-nac090304.php) goes dead. After some of the discussions today, I think this article definitely has merit.

New analysis cites economic impact of ADHD

NEW YORK-- A new analysis of a large-scale survey released today estimates yearly household income losses due to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) within the U.S. at $77 billion, according to Harvard researcher, Joseph Biederman, M.D., co-author of the study. "With this large-scale study we were able to control for personal and family characteristics, including characteristics closely tied to ADHD status to arrive at our estimate of yearly household income losses due to the condition," said Dr. Biederman, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and chief of clinical and research programs in pediatric psychopharmacology and adult ADHD at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Mass. "Our study shows the problems faced by people with ADHD, associated with every aspect of life, ranging from school difficulties to emotional difficulties to problems in the workplace have enormous economic impact."
Eight million adult Americans are estimated to struggle with the inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity of ADHD. Dr. Biederman spoke today at an American Medical Association media briefing on ADHD in New York City.
"Our survey shows that ADHD is a highly disabling disorder with a significant effect on a broad range of areas of functioning, including education and employment," Dr. Biederman said. "Even when matched for educational levels, ADHD individuals with a high school degree earn significantly less than their non-ADHD counterparts. On average, those with ADHD have household incomes that are about $10,791 lower for high school graduates and $4,334 lower for college graduates, compared to those who do not have ADHD."
"Adults with ADHD are less likely to have finished high school or to pursue further education," Dr. Biederman said. "Higher education was not only associated with an expected higher income, but was also associated with higher rates of full-time employment. We found that compared to high school education, those with a college degree were 20 percentage points more likely to have full-time employment. ADHD's effects on the ability to have full-time employment indirectly accounts for 17 percent of the projected $77 billion in losses due to ADHD."
"We saw that adults with ADHD had significant difficulties in the quality of their lives as well," he said. "They had higher divorce rates. Substance abuse was more common than in the control group. They reported a much lower level of satisfaction with all aspects of their lives. They were less likely to have a positive self-image or to be optimistic."
In the study, 500 adults who had been diagnosed with ADHD were matched for age and gender with 501 adults in the general population. In a 25-minute telephone interview, all the participants in the study were asked questions about school performance, substance abuse, driving records, use of tobacco, problems in the workplace, marital problems and problems with other relationships, their satisfaction with key aspects of their lives and their general outlook on life.
Participants in the study were evenly split between men and women. They were drawn from all over the country and included people from urban, suburban and rural areas. Of those with ADHD, about half had been diagnosed before they were 13 years old. More than one third (35 percent), however, had not been diagnosed until after age 18. Of those who had children, more than half reported that one or more of their children had also been diagnosed with ADHD. Only 36 percent of the adults with ADHD surveyed reported that they were taking a prescription medication for the disorder.
"These preliminary results underscore the importance of recognizing and understanding the problems faced by adults with ADHD," Dr. Biederman said. "It is striking that it appears that only about a third of those in the survey who have been diagnosed with ADHD are being treated appropriately. Better identification and treatment of adults with ADHD can improve lives and save Americans billions of dollars every year."
###
Media Advisory: To contact Joseph Biederman, M.D., contact Sue McGreevey at 617-724-2764 or at smcgreevey@partners.org. On the day of the briefing, call the AMA's Science News Department at 312-464-2410.

newfdog
07-15-08, 10:33 PM
Thanks for the article... I could be the poster person.... It's H^$L to find out you have a 138 IQ and did not finish High School...:(

SuzzanneX
07-16-08, 02:24 AM
Yes there is always more than one way to get the job done.
I prefer to take the best proven course when I want to get the job. I got the job done for way to long and way too difficult doing it "my own way." I am very happy with the added heop that my meds give me. The difference is night and day. I also try not to knock something that I haven't tried.


If i had only known there was a better way...
.....I would'nt have built an anti meth recovery board to scream it as
loud as I could to others who may not have known they were ADHD, would
see a doctor!
....I started at 17 years old.
if i had known and seen a dr.....I would be a commercial artist now.
.....but, I'm a meth addict instead.
that's what i spent my life studying.
......it's all I know, besides waitressing and cashiering.

My generations answer to ADHD
...was "sit down,pay attention and be quiet."

when I ran into the bytch that stole my life away...
.....tina promised to be the answer.
she turned on me, and I found she was a con artist, that fooled alot of
people.

the old bait and switch.
.....at first, all my difficulties keeping up, and staying focused were gone.
when I thought I knew what to expect, things changed for the worst.

ADD meds improve the quality of my life.
....meth darn near destroyed me.

all I got left is my soul.

....my sanity was replaced with insanity.
My ADHD became so severe, it crippled me mentally.


now..
...I HAVE TO TAKE DRUGS.
or i get in trouble with everyone i come in contact with.

family, work, friends....
.....that used to say:

suzie are you on drugs??

.........still say it.

but now they mean....I NEED to be on em.
....instead of i need to quit.


the irony.

reesah
07-16-08, 05:46 AM
the word "underemployed" stings me. I could be doing much more and earning three times as much if I had the ambition and organizational skills of many of my peers.

JadeEmperor
07-23-08, 12:33 AM
Oh, yeah... the phrase "a can of worms" comes to mind when I look at the diversity of opinions about drug therapy.

My last two doctors (psychiatrists) have bothered to spend my time and money bad-rapping my medication (Dexedrine 40mg/day). My current doctor's only getting the pleasure of my company and the benefit of my erudition for the second time in a couple of days and I hope he's still trainable (he's young, so there's still hope). My last doctor was my age and he doesn't have ADD so there was no hope of straightening him out -- I lasted three sessions of him telling me the medication was going to kill me or make me insane before bolting for the door; I should have gotten up and left the first time he did his quaint little negative programming dance about the meds he was prescribing me (there were several other issues too... where did all the good doctors go off to? ...it's not just me, is it?). I was thinking, "Wow! This guy is just the sort of positive support that I need to make a go at successful therapy -- NOT!" I mean, what kind of head tripping weirdo tells you that you require a certain medication, provides that medication and then tells you it will kill you? ("G*d d*mn, I say, G*d d*mn the pusher man" - Steppenwolf song). The human race will, no doubt, extinct it's self by self-contradiction.

Dr. D. Amen has said about escalating, high-dosage use of amphetamine (the so-called "binge pattern of abuse") by people with ADD that it's the "right drug; wrong dosage". My understanding about the place of the drugs is that ADD/ADHD is primarily a genetic neurological condition with a 5,000% higher chance than the average person (who ever that is!) of a psychiatric co-morbidity (and a slightly less chance than other of having physical disorders). The way I look at it is that without compensatory medication one risks spending time propagating co-morbidities. Addressing neurological function is foundational.

A while back I was seeing a General Practitioner who was prescribing in ten day units and hunting so hard for some reason to take me off the meds it was starting to seriously get on my nerves. My normal blood pressure is like 127/68 and it started going up 10 points each visit. He actually told me that the ADD was subtle and down there and the BP was something that had to be dealt with first -- that is when I realized that he wasn't a doctor practicing medicine but a para-medic doing triage. He insisted I take that Metaprol (is that it?) BP medication and I actually tried it in the spirit of meeting him half-way. At home I couldn't stand up without getting dizzy but the next time I was in his office my BP went to 165/95. And I said, yet again, that I felt a need for the question that I had asked in the first session about the prognosis for long term drug therapy to be addressed instead of watching him chasing his tail -- or rather my iatrogenic stress as there's nothing like $80 worth of wasted time for one's BP. He did a double take on the chart and saw the BP's pattern of escalation for the first time. He then said, "Well, I'll have to believe you when you say your BP not normally that high because if it was you'd be dead by now... you're too complicated for my practice" Uh... let's see; oh, yeah... my point there is dealing with the ADD is, to me, central. One of his nurses condescendingly ask me if I thought that the ADD medication would fix everything. I go, like; doh! -- of course. Aren't happy, active people healthier people?

I think the (IMHO) nonsense of the War on Drugs (what Bill Hicks called "really a War on Personal Freedom") has, by the pressure of high price, questionable quality, short supply and law enforcement, twisted what are (again, IMHO) some of the more useful and interesting tools discovered to date into patterns of abuse that are then used to justify the War on Drugs. (You can bet that someone is making some money somewhere... hey, what's Ollie North up to these days?) And that this produces the kind of conflict both within the individual and in the society that makes people so easily pushed around and taken advantage of.

All of this is certainly a good example of something.

I don't know if everyone remembers that before 1974 (the year Lilly lost it's license to manufacture amphetamine because it was over-producing and dumping them on the black market AND the year that the US economy plunged into a recession) nearly anyone over the age of 21 could phone a doctor and complain about getting up and going to work in the morning and he would phone in a 'script to the pharmacy for you. My grandfather (who, quite naturally, had undiagnosed ADD/ADHD) used to huff a Benzedrex Inhaler about every ten to twenty minutes and was productive and popular. When they took the Benzedrine (dl-amphetamine) out of the inhalers it killed him... literally, as his growing existential frustration lead to a heart attack while trying to kick a wrinkle out of the living room rug.

I wonder how many people in prison for what is basically a pattern of poor impulse control, risk taking behavior and substance (ab)use have undiagnosed ADD/ADHD.

I wonder if people know that a lot of what's being sold as 'meth' is really N-methyl-cathinone.

I wonder if ADD/ADHD is learned, that is operantly conditioned, brain behavior and some of us are just quicker learners than others.

I wonder if everyone could benefit from ADD medications and some of us are just the squeakiest wheel.

I wonder if Aleister Crowley was spot-on right when he said, "Let heroin, cocaine and the like be freely available to all. Those who abuse them we are better off without".

I wonder if I should ask my new doctor to see if he thinks my symptoms are being effectively controlled.

I wonder if this has addressed usefully any of the issues brought up in this forum thread... oops, too late.

SuzzanneX
07-23-08, 12:40 AM
no...
.....not everyone could benifit from ADD meds.

just those of us who wanna shove a knife in our head, or can't function properly.

.....I belive that if people like us were'nt in mental anguish, add meds would be deadly.

as for me, it's deadly not to be on em.

...I went to the shrink because i wanted to die.

and I did'nt CARE about ANYTHING, because i'd just loose it anyway.

JadeEmperor
07-23-08, 02:49 AM
Hi,

You're right, of course. I've seen people get uselessly silly on psycho-stimulants. Like a leaf being swept along or popcorn popping -- which is what I'm like without them. Something else that I had noticed is that (before my diagnosis) when some emergency would occur... somebody dying, a car wreck, somebody with a gun kicking in the door... stuff like that, everyone would get dizzy with adrenaline whereas I would step up and take charge like it was perfectly natural and in a way I couldn't have anticipated by my "normal" half-there condition. I eventually considered that was what tempted risk-taking and what not. A motorcycle 40 mph over the speed limit was a meditational seat for me.

Since the initiation of Me Version 2.0 in Dec. 2005 I've lapsed meds twice. Once for five days after learning a lesson about maintaining securing and the only thing that pulled me out was my doctor (my first one, the good one) barking at me on the phone that I'd gotten by for all my life before without them and I could darned well make it to the end of the week without them. It was the force of his paternalistic command that was the only thing beside what seemed to me at the time to be a time-less grey abyss. The other time was for 25 days by reason of some fools who dared call themselves a clinic (I won't go into that now, I promise). I weathered the first two days telling myself that it was withdrawal and it would be better soon, but on day three I hit an emotional wall where I found myself indulging myself in wondering what the point of any of this was because I was forced to remember that this was Me Version 1.0 now and, frankly, I found that I didn't like him very much at all.

My first doctor (the good one) was of the opinion that even with what he said was the most severe case he'd seen (it was his specialty) I seemed relatively free of psychological co-morbidities. He asked me what I had told myself (note: this is when I still thought kindly of Me Version 1.0) to protect myself from what must have obviously been my failure to fit into any thing that would have looked like "successful" to most people and I said, "Oh, that's easy... I'm right... they're wrong." He managed to shake out any remaining appreciation I had for Me Version 1.0 by saying, "Well, be that as it may... right or wrong, at the end of the day they are still there to deal with."

From that point on I've been pretty intolerant of doctors who tell me about "centralizing the drug" or "dependency". I've quite often asked them if they drove a car to work that morning and what they would do if the car hadn't started... how important would it be for them to get to work that day even if they had to call a taxi or something to get there on time. It's funny (no, odd...) that they quite often don't see the connection when I then describe the medication as my vehicle which with to get to work. Nevertheless, it has come closer to communicating than saying, "You don't have ADD. You've never taken the compensatory medication. What the expletive deleted do you know about any of this anyway?!" People sometimes have a unfortunately low tolerance to the truth of things.

The Buddha pointed out that attachment is the root of suffering and that all is impermanent. You could look at that brief moment of transition of something found becoming something lost as you would look at a flower as it transits from being a seed to being a seed. The trick, I think, about living in (seemingly) linear time is to see moving as the steady state and not trying too much to hold still or reverse the stream. Or as Grace Slick once said, "Life is change; how it differs from the rocks." After all, just 'cause they are still there at the end of the day it still doesn't necessarily make them right.

failurebydesign
08-03-08, 11:48 PM
i totally feel ur pain and agree with u suzzanne.

the fact that i know i need meds is because i am DYSFUNCTIONAL without them- i have no chance at life and will die one way or the other from the comorid disorders resulting from undiagnosed ahdh. My family, who pre-add were against all drugs, now as urs remind me to take them and know when I'm not. The reason is simple; meds have saved my life -literally.

Its obvious that meds affect those with adhd contradictorily to those without. Most ppl would get hyper with these meds and increase adhd behaviour (impulsiveness, inattn etc) but we calm down, slow down, process, and focus. What i still don't understand is WHY is it so hard for doctors to know who has adhd; give em a pill if u suspect and then watch them after its kicked in. i really don't get why they are so reluctant to prescribe when they can do a simple scientific experiment to evaluate a genuine adhd'er
[quote=SuzzanneX;616628]no...
.....not everyone could benifit from ADD meds.

just those of us who wanna shove a knife in our head, or can't function properly.

.....I belive that if people like us were'nt in mental anguish, add meds would be deadly.

as for me, it's deadly not to be on em.

...I went to the shrink because i wanted to die.

and I did'nt CARE about ANYTHING, because i'd just loose it anyway.[/quote

Mincan
08-04-08, 12:55 AM
....my sanity was replaced with insanity.
My ADHD became so severe, it crippled me mentally.


now..
...I HAVE TO TAKE DRUGS.
or i get in trouble with everyone i come in contact with.

Do you think my breakdown in September of last year, coupled with my sudden drastic use of alcohol and cannabis, and subsequent use of ritalin and dexedrine has made my adhd so bad it makes me insane and cripples me.

Everyone, I am afraid sometimes I will become a schizophrenic soon if not doomed to it.

xstarchildx
08-04-08, 07:20 AM
I was a self medicator untill i got help, a diagnosis, and the right medication, i don't even think about touching the old drug any more.

MissAdhd
08-04-08, 12:14 PM
I find it hard to imagine that the other 64% is going unmedicated! I certainly do not envy them.

prescription medicated.. doesn't mean they dont self medicate.

spunkysmum
12-20-08, 03:09 AM
The article is a scientific discussion. According to studies, medication works. It's been known for a long time that behavior management alone was not as successful as medication alone. The combination of medication and behavior therapy is a win, win situation for people who respond to medication.

I am definitely not brain washed and I forgave society a long time ago.


I guess I still get the vibe that it's taking medication that is still far too often frowned upon socially.

spunkysmum
12-20-08, 03:20 AM
i totally feel ur pain and agree with u suzzanne.

the fact that i know i need meds is because i am DYSFUNCTIONAL without them- i have no chance at life and will die one way or the other from the comorid disorders resulting from undiagnosed ahdh. My family, who pre-add were against all drugs, now as urs remind me to take them and know when I'm not. The reason is simple; meds have saved my life -literally.

Its obvious that meds affect those with adhd contradictorily to those without. Most ppl would get hyper with these meds and increase adhd behaviour (impulsiveness, inattn etc) but we calm down, slow down, process, and focus. What i still don't understand is WHY is it so hard for doctors to know who has adhd; give em a pill if u suspect and then watch them after its kicked in. i really don't get why they are so reluctant to prescribe when they can do a simple scientific experiment to evaluate a genuine adhd'er

I am so thankful that I have a GP who was willing to try me on meds right away before I even had an appointment at the behavioural health clinic.

mctavish23
12-20-08, 01:32 PM
One study,in and of itself, means very little.

The data on the use of stimulants,which dates back to 1937, is largely positive.

I recently posted on a follow up study regarding the use of stimulants to treat ADHD, reducing the risk of a Substance Use Disorder (SUD).

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mctavish23
12-20-08, 10:17 PM
The use of stimulant medication for the TREATMENT of a proven, genetically / inherited, neurobiological, brain based, disorder

of inhibition, self-control and working memory, backed by 71 years of empirical (research) support as being an effective

TREATMENT for over 90+% of those (actually) suffering with the disorder, represents the intended purpose of those data.

ADHD is THE most widely researched childhood disorder / developmental disability on earth.

Beginning with the first research study on what we now call ADHD in 1902, we're rapidly approaching 10 K studies, books,

chapters in books, etc.

Those data have combined to show us the nature of the disorder.

Specifically, the METRIC for ( measuring ) ADHD is DEVELOPMENTAL DEVIANCE.

Simply put,when it comes to the difference between medication & (street) drugs,

that's where you "draw the line" between sufferers & substance abusers.

Developmental Deviance is comparing the ADHD individual with their same age /same gender, non-ADHD peers.

They do not experience IMPAIRMENTS ( problems) in their major life activities when displaying the symptoms.

That means the CLINICAL THRESHOLD for ADHD is IMPAIRMENT.

No Impairment. No Disorder.

Comparing a legitimate treatment with the abuse of that same treatment, does nothing to invalidate it.

What it really does is separate appropriate from inappropriate use.

I'm a recovering coke addict / speed freak from the 1970's.

I've been through outpatient treatment twice.

This coming March 25th will be 21 years of taking life "One day at a time."

The length of time is not meant to be egotistical, as I put no greater value than "right now."

It's meant to show that "I get it."

I won't belabor what I've already posted on many times.

All my docs are informed of my recovery.

Currently, I take Adderall & Wellbutrin.

Fortunately for me, my medication makes me sleepy.

If I got a "buzz," I could not / would not take it.

My only hope here is that those of us with the disorder, feel no shame or embarrassment in treating it.


Happy Holidays

&

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

PS

Just in case I haven't said this enough,

SuzX still "rules."

mctavish23
12-20-08, 10:32 PM
I forgot to mention that medication represents a personal choice for those suffering with the disorder.

As previously stated, behavior management,which is the only other evidence based treatment besides meds, does work.

The caveat is that the minute you remove the structure of the environment, the ADHD individual's impairments immediately

re appear ( return to baseline).

Using a combination of the two continues to have empirical support as being the most "effective."

Anyway, this is an excellent topic and I have appreciated the input it's generated.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Imnapl
12-21-08, 12:17 AM
I guess I still get the vibe that it's taking medication that is still far too often frowned upon socially.Actually, it's only a very prolific, noisy, minority who frowns on taking medication. You should hang out in my world and see who has disclosed their diagnosis and medication lately. :cool: