View Full Version : Parents urged to report children's reactions to food dyes.


Tilly
08-24-08, 11:36 AM
Just passing on this terrific effort to clean up our food in the us.
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For Immediate Release: August 21, 2008
Food Additives and Hyperactive Behavior

Parents Urged to Report Children's Reactions to Food Dyes
Watchdog Group Wants Ban on Yellow 5, Red 40, and Other Artificial Food Dyes Linked to Hyperactivity, Behavior Problems
WASHINGTON—The Center for Science in the Public Interest is asking America's parents for help in its campaign to convince the Food and Drug Administration that synthetic dyes, such as Yellow 5 and Red 40, don't belong in foods, especially those consumed by children. The dyes are being phased out in European countries because of important new evidence showing that the dyes, and perhaps the preservative sodium benzoate, cause hyperactivity and other behavior problems in children.
CSPI is urging parents who believe their children are harmed by food dyes to file reports online at http://www.cspinet.org/fooddyes/. (http://www.cspinet.org/fooddyes/) The nonprofit nutrition and food-safety watchdog group will periodically forward the reports to the FDA, which denies that dyes cause any problem whatsoever. CSPI wants to hear from parents who believe that food dyes impair their children's behavior, as well as parents whose kids' behavior improved when food dyes were eliminated from their diets.
"Considering the problems that have been demonstrated with these dyes, along with the fact that they are easily replaced with natural colorings, it's sad that the FDA is doing nothing to get them out of food," said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson. "Meanwhile, doctors are prescribing powerful drugs like Ritalin and Adderall to undo the damage being done, in part, by the increasingly unnatural food supply."
Consumption of food dyes has increased five-fold over the past 30 years, according to FDA data.
In the 1970s, scientists first realized that food dyes might cause behavioral problems when allergist Benjamin Feingold reported that many of his young patients improved when artificial food dyes, preservatives, and certain natural foods were removed from their diets. Many parents who put their children on the Feingold Diet, which screens out those substances, report fewer tantrums, more focused school work, and other welcome changes.
In the past several years, two British studies found that food dyes, together with the preservative sodium benzoate, impair the behavior of many children. CSPI filed a regulatory petition in June that called on the FDA to ban Yellow 5 and 6, Red 3 and 40, Blue 1 and 2, Green 3, and Orange B.
Most multinational food companies are already phasing those dyes out of foods in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe—even though American versions of the very same products continue to get their colors from synthetic dyes. The syrup in a strawberry sundae from a McDonald's in the U.K. gets its red color from strawberries; in the U.S., the red color comes from 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-hydroxy-5-((6-methoxy-4-sulfo-m-tolyl)azo)-, disodium salt, a coal-derived chemical otherwise known by its less unappetizing name, Red 40. Similarly, a Betty Crocker yellow cake mix is colored in the United States with Yellow 5 and Yellow 6, but in Britain with safe natural colorings.
"The food industry won’t fix its American foods until the FDA tells them to," said Jacobson. "Unfortunately, the FDA asserts, on the basis of its misreading of a 25-year-old report, that there is ‘no evidence’ that dyes affect behavior. If companies like Mars, Kellogg, and McDonald’s were responsible, they would immediately begin switching to safe, natural colorings in the United States."
This isn’t the first time that CSPI has collected adverse reaction reports on food additives. It has been collecting and analyzing reports filed about the diarrhea-inducing synthetic fat olestra, or Olean, and a fungus-based meat substitute known as Quorn that can cause projectile vomiting and anaphylactic reactions.

speedo
08-24-08, 12:04 PM
One person's effort at "cleaning up our food" is anopther person's ploy to make a fast buck on fear uncertainty and doubt.

The link you posted contains a lot of misinformation from the very beginning. Not to mention the fact that tests of the Feingold diet have shown it to basically have no effect on hyperactivity.

The hard line from DAN is simply spam and fear mongering . It's is just horrid and deserves to be pointed out


Me :D

Imnapl
08-24-08, 01:44 PM
One of the benefits of having a free enterprise system is that if consumers don't buy a product, the manufacturer will change it.

Marcia
08-25-08, 10:46 PM
Make a buck? How does stating opinions make a buck?

You are wrong about the Feingold diet. In September of last year an excellent study was published in The Lancet, showing that food dyes and one preservative brought on ADHD symptoms in children, even those with no prior problems. Then in February the American Academy of Pediatrics said that a diet free of synthetic food additives is a reasonable intervention for the treatment of ADHD. And in May the British Medical Journal published an editorial calling for diet to be considered a standard treatment for ADHD. See diet-studies.com for details on the many studies the support the use of a diet free of certain additives as an effective treatment for ADHD.

20trackedmind
08-25-08, 11:15 PM
Actually it has helped my son so much. I think it is worth trying out. I found out so much about what triggers certain behaviors in my son. I don't think it is a substitute for meds, but it is a good tool, that has helped bring my 4 yr old up to an age appropriate level in social skills, behavior and cognitive abilities. Just what I have observed in my son.


Not to mention the fact that tests of the Feingold diet have shown it to basically have no effect on hyperactivity.


Me :D

Colin
08-25-08, 11:31 PM
well I dont like chemical additves in my food, and i dont see the point in most of the coloruings used. mostly I dont trust the research thats been done to prove that they are safe and dont cause any problems. plus i find i realy dont like the taste of most of the very artifiacial additives.

however I think the evidence is that there is little contributyion from food dye to most cases of adhd. but if theres one case in 1000 then its worth trying as they are simply unecessary imo. i think the evidence thaty suggest food dye is involved in adhd is very poor quality, although i havnt bother to take the time to investigate it.

I think as long as it doesnt detract from the very real need for medication for most people its ok.

I know my deit has changed a lot and my adhd type problems have never changed much.
however finaly at 46 yrs old ive find cows milk that ive drank so much of makes me full of catarh, ive now switched to goats milk, and can breath through my nose nearly all the time.

at the bottom line removing artifial additives is probably the easiest and safest thing to try first, as long as you still have a healthy diet. although tbh in this day and age its hard to find anything that hasnt been mesed about with.

Tilly
08-26-08, 10:08 AM
I didn't really post this to have a debate so I'm going to try to keep out of debating.


I am elated to see that there is an effort going on to put our experiences together and get them sent to the powers that be.

I know their are other folks here who have noticed a reaction to artificials. I've seen it within various posts. Some of these folks will be happy to send in a report as well.

I will be filing a report for my adhd son as well as my daughter for migraines.

20trackedmind
08-26-08, 11:08 AM
One of the benefits of having a free enterprise system is that if consumers don't buy a product, the manufacturer will change it.

I know... Isn't it great! :) I can now go to Walmart and get a variety of foods that are free of artificial colors, flavors, preservatives and even corn syrup. Not just one or two brands anymore either. Kashi is wonderful and has everything from Pizza to waffles and Annies makes every kid snack from chedder bunnies (goldfish) to chocolate bunnies (teddy grams). And pepperige farms makes a variety of pure, healthy breads that I can choose from. Ever Quaker Oats now has a variety of breakfast bars that are free of all that stuff.

These companies must be getting the message or they would not be going through such an effort.


Europe is way ahead of us though in what the allow food companies to put into consumer foods.

Tilly
08-26-08, 01:23 PM
I agree 20 track we are so fortunate to have so many healthy choices at this point.

And if we keep speaking up we'll get more.

Hopefully they will clean up all food and some fortunate folks who don't even know they have a problem will benefit from our efforts as well. I'm not saying everyone has a problem, but I do think some people do and don't know it. I was one of those who didn't know. And my family suffered for a few years. I'm lucky I ever figured it out at all.

Imnapl
08-26-08, 01:33 PM
I know... Isn't it great! :) I can now go to Walmart and get a variety of foods that are free of artificial colors, flavors, preservatives and even corn syrup. Not just one or two brands anymore either. Kashi is wonderful and has everything from Pizza to waffles and Annies makes every kid snack from chedder bunnies (goldfish) to chocolate bunnies (teddy grams). And pepperige farms makes a variety of pure, healthy breads that I can choose from. Ever Quaker Oats now has a variety of breakfast bars that are free of all that stuff.

These companies must be getting the message or they would not be going through such an effort.


Europe is way ahead of us though in what the allow food companies to put into consumer foods.When my son was born, thirty years ago, commercial baby food manufacturers were still adding unneeded salt and sugar. Our prenatal class was told to boycott them. I did, even though I went back to work full time when my son was four months old.

Many nights my husband, the chef, and I were up late making nutritional meals we could freeze. I did a lot or research and found a great recipe book written by a Canadian nutritionist whose own babies taste tested her recipes. My son's favorite was a baby macaroni and cheese casserole that was semi blended and frozen in mini tinfoil containers that even looked cute. I never ate avacado before I discovered it was nutitional, fast food for babies.

By the time our daughter was born five years later, commercial baby food labels no longer listed added sugar or salt. We all need to get back to basics. People in developing countries are discouraging women from breast feeding their babies and buying commercial formula. Why?

Can you really trust the restaurant or store produce department not to spray any preservatives on your salad ingredients? The 100 mile diet is making a lot of sense these days.

Imnapl
08-26-08, 01:47 PM
Does legislating restrictions work better than boycotting? Last Christmas consumers sent a very strong message to toy manufacturers who contract out to Chinese factories. All we need is the information.

jb745
08-26-08, 03:01 PM
I'm glad you found this and posted it. It's nice that a group with at least some credibility is studying this.

Our various governments ought to do it, but they've sold out.

Yeah, I know some people will bash this and the whole concept of non-medical approaches. Let 'em.

20trackedmind
08-26-08, 03:41 PM
I'm glad you found this and posted it. It's nice that a group with at least some credibility is studying this.

Our various governments ought to do it, but they've sold out.

Yeah, I know some people will bash this and the whole concept of non-medical approaches. Let 'em.

Hopefully there will be no bashing today:) Everyone is intitled to their opinion!

Imnapl
08-27-08, 02:12 AM
Make a buck? How does stating opinions make a buck?

You are wrong about the Feingold diet. In September of last year an excellent study was published in The Lancet, showing that food dyes and one preservative brought on ADHD symptoms in children, even those with no prior problems. Then in February the American Academy of Pediatrics said that a diet free of synthetic food additives is a reasonable intervention for the treatment of ADHD. And in May the British Medical Journal published an editorial calling for diet to be considered a standard treatment for ADHD. See diet-studies.com for details on the many studies the support the use of a diet free of certain additives as an effective treatment for ADHD.

Meadd823 wrote in another thread (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=574743&postcount=148):

"When facts are muddled by opinion and allowed to go unchallenged due to individual preferences and emotions then we have done ADDF members seeking information a grave disservice."

There is a review of the British study here (http://fooddemocracy.wordpress.com/2007/10/03/study-shows-food-additives-may-make-kids-hyper/).

Tilly
08-28-08, 06:33 PM
Does legislating restrictions work better than boycotting? Last Christmas consumers sent a very strong message to toy manufacturers who contract out to Chinese factories. All we need is the information.

I agree. But I also think that lead paint got an awful lot of attention in the media which made consumers take careful watch. Lead paint isn't a legal ingredient for toys so that certainly adds to the fire.

Unfortunately artificial ingredients are legal and deemed safe by our government. Many consumers believe the FDA protects us so they don't believe these ingredients are unhealthy. Many don't look for a connection between artificials and behavior.

Getting the word out to folks who don't know about it and having a way to report reactions will help alot.

If nothing else I feel better knowing I have at least done what I could to say this is wrong. And yes I boycot these foods. I don't eat them myself and I don't buy them for my family.

INaBOX
08-29-08, 02:36 AM
im a label reader myself.. in fact, im appalled on what i do find on them and to know hidden ingredients still exists (red tape society). food colouring .. heavy topic. i steer clear from it myself. i wont look at cupcakes, birthday cakes, smarties the same. luckily my son has been well educated so he understands why i dont buy certain foods.

DesertDave
08-30-08, 12:52 AM
SMARTIES!!! I saw those today with Halloween candy when I was shopping. What kid doesn't like those? But then it clicked in my little brain that I'm sure all of that stuff (except chocolate, of course) is full of artificial color/flavor and who knows what else.

And I'm finally taking the time to read the labels on food. It's amazing to see what is added to some foods that I always thought were pretty basic. Example: bread. So I put several kinds back when I had no recognition of some of the contents. I chose the one that had the fewest chemicals.

Tilly
09-01-08, 05:18 PM
The number one artificial ingredient you need to look out for in chocolate in vanillin. vanilla is natural and vanillin is not.

BTW vanillin was the cause of my daughters chronic migraines. We didn't figure this out until we put my son on his diet and her migraines went away.

It's interesting because some people think they have a problem with chocolate, but it's just the chocolate with vanillin in it. My husband always thought it was chocolate giving him headaches and now that we buy chocolate flavored with real vanilla and he can have it.

Of course others are actually allergic to the chocolate.

DesertDave
09-02-08, 12:40 AM
Thanks for the heads up on that. I love chocolate. So I grabbed my bag of Hershey's Special Dark chocolate chips. Guess what? It's got vanillin AND unnamed artificial flavors. No, I'm not going to throw them away. But I won't be buying them again.

Kryistina
12-29-09, 08:04 AM
I'm sending in my reports too.

My kids and I ALL get a bit (or a lot) wacky when we get a little red#40 or blue#1 into us...