View Full Version : Stiff when doing things you are not used to- what is it called?


mrsmith
09-03-08, 11:32 AM
It is normal to be stiff/sore/inflamed when you do stuff you haven't done in a while or has never done.

Thus there is a kind of fitness which is to be conditioned to certain movements.
What is this called?

CrystalShiloh
09-03-08, 11:54 AM
I'm not sure what word you're searching for, but if you're stiff and sore, try stretching before and after the activity. This book is a great reference: Stretching: 20th Anniversary Revised Edition by Bob and Jean Anderson. (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Stretching/Bob-Anderson/e/9780936070223/?itm=2) I hope this helps!

DeloresMelon
09-03-08, 12:02 PM
yes, when you use muscles that aren't used to being exerted, there is soreness and stiffness. stretching before activities which involve such is a good idea.

as far as what you're referring to.. maybe calisthenics?

"In the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States), calisthenics are exercises (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise) consisting of a variety of simple movements, usually performed without weights or equipment, that are intended to increase body strength and flexibility using the weight of one's own body for resistance. Repeated motions of calisthenics done over an extended period of time builds muscle endurance."

obviously it's always a good idea to exercise. if you're just talking about an achy back after moving the couch, then yeah, you're gonna be sore. Increasing your activity level and introducing some form of muscle exercise will reduce the likelihood of future aches and soreness.

the stiffness and soreness is just an indication that that muscle isn't used to whatever you just did. In the rare instance the muscle is damaged, the pain could be significant and last longer than a day or two, and includes swelling, redness, inflammation, etc.

mrsmith
09-03-08, 06:05 PM
("kind of fitness" means aerobic capacity, strength, endurance etc.)

mrsmith
09-04-08, 03:35 AM
yes, when you use muscles that aren't used to being exerted, there is soreness and stiffness.

Think it is more inflammation? Perhaps tenseness (as in a tense neck)


stretching before activities which involve such is a good idea.

If stretching had any particular effect it should be some time after.


as far as what you're referring to.. maybe calisthenics?

Can see it was misunderstood. See my previous post.


obviously it's always a good idea to exercise.

It is not obvious :-)


if you're just talking about an achy back after moving the couch, then yeah, you're gonna be sore.

Not a good example. Thinking more of doing bench when you haven't done it in a while, first day of skiing, starting a MA class or a full day mountain hike.

Ian
09-04-08, 10:53 AM
It is normal to be stiff/sore/inflamed when you do stuff you haven't done in a while or has never done.

Thus there is a kind of fitness which is to be conditioned to certain movements.
What is this called?

I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll take a swing at it and hope I'm close. :)

That's the very essence of training I think. When I do regular core exercise there isn't much that surprises me. I hadn't done any heavy lifting or run any stairs in a very long time, but last weekend I helped one of the daughters boyfriends move into a second floor apartment. I had not a single sore muscle and we worked hard for about three hours.

Training is just that. It's slowly and regularly applying stresses to train the body to adapt in a way that leaves one stronger in one way or another. I never train in a similar way if my muscles are still for the next day. Rest and recovery are as important in taking advantage of the training effects as the work out is.
Hope this helps.

mrsmith
09-04-08, 04:10 PM
I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll take a swing at it and hope I'm close. :)

That's the very essence of training I think.
No, if you do bench for example, the "essence" is strength. But there is also a fitness factor X which is what I am talking about here.

(But factor X is perhaps essential in being fit, to be able to surf ski or move furniture without being dead for a week after )

Mary
09-04-08, 04:18 PM
No, if you do bench for example, the "essence" is strength. But there is also a fitness factor X which is what I am talking about here.

(But factor X is perhaps essential in being fit, to be able to surf ski or move furniture without being dead for a week after )

... try water aerobics.. less stress on the muscles and tendons... and it helps relax rather that make tense.

I felt better with pool therapy...than doing regular exercises. Talk to a PT or fitness trainer about a light exercise routine.. that will help you, rather than put you flat in bed.

mrsmith
09-07-08, 07:43 AM
This that one get more sore/inflamed when one does something one is not used to. Is it (U) just a reaction to the use, or is it (B) a stronger reaction to a primary soreness.

In case of (B), can Factor X be improved by just moving?

MECMR
09-07-08, 09:10 AM
This that one get more sore/inflamed when one does something one is not used to. Is it (U) just a reaction to the use, or is it (B) a stronger reaction to a primary soreness.

In case of (B), can Factor X be improved by just moving?

If a body does not move, then moving will help (B) because (B) will lessen with use and movelment, and getting used to the movement.

If I do bench presses at the gym, I am sore. If I NEVER get off the couch except to do bench presses, I am more sore than if I did some exercise every week.

Does that help? Not sure what you mean by "primary soreness"

mrsmith
09-07-08, 09:23 AM
> Not sure what you mean by "primary soreness"
If X is a response to soreness (like inflammation response to muscle breakdown). Then the soreness it responds to is the primary soreness.

Also alternative B is the opposite of what you indicate.
(You write that movement is the important thing, while B is about breakdown/primary soreness)

Practically, the issues is if you can can prepare for for example bench by doing it very lightly, or if you have to do something close to the real thing (And then, are you just spreading the pain?)

MECMR
09-07-08, 11:01 AM
Okay...primary soreness is muscle breakdown.

X is the inflamation caused by that breakdown.

(Have I got this so far?)

Muscle "breakdown" happens each time a muscle is used beyond it's previous capacity. If you are used to lifting 10 pounds, and now lift 12, some breakdown will happen. In conditioning, it is the consistent breakdown and rebuilding of muscle tissue that causes strength and growth. So, each time you do a bicep curl, you are breaking down muscle fiber from it's previous pattern, and it rebuilds into a new one which is able to hold that weight..in a sense, it gets "stronger".

First one section of the muscle will hold the weight...as you increase it, and the first section can handle it, the next region is taxed (so to speak) and IT breaks down and rebuilds. Not "spreading" the pain, exactly, but the primary soreness does shift. So, from bicep curls, you might feel it in one section for a while...as you cease to feel that, you increase weight, and the next section is where you feel the sensation.

If you do something different, you might use different parts of the muscle, and thereby feel it again. So, after lifting a 20 pound weight for bicep curls, you might feel pretty strong. Pick up a squirming 20 pound baby, and suddenly you are holding a weight that is distributed differently (mobile vs. static, longer, wider, etc.) and is held differently (you would not grab a toddler around the middle in a grip like you would a barbell!), even if it is the same numeric weight.

So, to get ready for an activity, you can try doing it lightly for a while before hand, and thereby build up a capacity to handle it. However, even weightlifters might feel an ache after moving furniture all day long. Lifting a piano bench or a sofa is different than lifting a barbell.

I don't think you can ever duplicate things exactly, even with static weights. How much water did you drink that day, what is the gravitational pull of the Earth at that point on the Earth's surface...what shoes are you wearing, are they more worn on one heel than last week?

I think this might be as far as we can help without a concrete example. Are you attempting to get ready for a marathon? Are you looking for ways to exercise your capacity to focus? Brain matter is not worked like muscle matter, brain matter works on building nural pathways, which is different from building muscle mass. Can you give a concrete example of what you are trying to do, or hope to do?

mrsmith
09-07-08, 11:43 AM
"spreading the pain"
If you start bench and do the first sessions lightly, you will have less pain when you do it at normal effort (compared to your capacity), though you might be only "spreading the pain" (I alt U it would not be)

mrsmith
09-08-08, 11:18 AM
I think this might be as far as we can help without a concrete example. Are you attempting to get ready for a marathon? Are you looking for ways to exercise your capacity to focus? Brain matter is not worked like muscle matter, brain matter works on building nural pathways, which is different from building muscle mass. Can you give a concrete example of what you are trying to do, or hope to do?
(Dont think the mechanism describes is correct)

Say I do strength (bench), I would like to minimize factor X effect, and also to know if it is there, so I can decide if I should really be doing it for example.

Also say I expect to be doing a long one-day mountain hike, I would to have an idea about the best way to prepare for it.

ecu20
09-08-08, 11:43 AM
I workout, it's called DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness. If that's not what you were looking for, then I have no idea, and am sorry :o.


Also say I expect to be doing a long one-day mountain hike, I would to have an idea about the best way to prepare for it.

squats, calf raises, good mornings, dead lifts, and more squats.

If you are attempting to prepare for it, I sure hope it is 5+ months away. Fitness is a marathon, not a sprint, unless you use anabolic androgenic steroids ;)

mrsmith
09-08-08, 12:27 PM
I workout, it's called DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness. If that's not what you were looking for, then I have no idea, and am sorry :o.
DOMS is often explained as inflammatory response to unfamiliar activities. But I am talking about the tendency to get DOMS/soreness etc. from the unfamiliar aspect of specific exercises.


squats, calf raises, good mornings, dead lifts, and more squats.

If you are attempting to prepare for it, I sure hope it is 5+ months away. Fitness is a marathon, not a sprint, unless you use anabolic androgenic steroids ;)
Factor X can be improved quite rapidly compared to strength, stamnia etc. I.e. "DOMS" is much less the second day you do bench, or if you ski, the first day is worst.

Valentine

ecu20
09-08-08, 05:36 PM
DOMS is often explained as inflammatory response to unfamiliar activities. But I am talking about the tendency to get DOMS/soreness etc. from the unfamiliar aspect of specific exercises.


Factor X can be improved quite rapidly compared to strength, stamnia etc. I.e. "DOMS" is much less the second day you do bench, or if you ski, the first day is worst.

Valentine

DOMS is still not fully understood in the exercise community, but there are plenty of theories.

Red = i think is BS | Green = i think is possible

1) lactic acid buildup (doubt it, lactic acid doesn't last for 3+ days)

2) microscopic tearing of muscle fibers (yep possible that there's more tear the first couple of times you do a new exercise, and once your body adapts somewhat, the muscle fiber tear is minimized)

3) eccentric muscle contractions (movements that causes the muscles to forcefully contract while lengthening at the same time). Some examples of that are squats and pushups.

Hope this has cleared up some information :)