View Full Version : Gifted Adults and ADHD


nomADD
09-15-08, 10:04 AM
Just read this article by Dr Kathleen Nadeau on Working with Gifted Adults with ADHD http://www.chesapeakeadd.com/pdf/adhd/gift_adults_adhd.pdf

I've massively underachieved academically, but I'm not lacking in talent or intellect. The inattentiveness makes it damn near impossible for me to knuckle down and work under my own steam outside of the classroom. I don't know how many times I started courses but was unable to get the homework assignments done.

How have other folks with Inattentive ADHD coped with this?

GiddyMoon
09-15-08, 10:45 AM
All four of my kids fall within the very high gifted range. I have two boys produce test scores that people in the district haven't seen in over 20 years..it is hard to know what to do with children like this..especially when they would forget their head if it wasn't attached.

Medication has worked wonders...until around 4:30 pm.....and consistent daily intervention on our part by being home and using every moment as a learning moment..I am just hoping to make a real difference by the time they are adults...so they don;'t have the same problems as their dad..who had no intervention...we will see.

akko
09-15-08, 12:04 PM
Yep, I was in the gifted program in high school. I barely graduated though. I'm also a talented artist (no modesty there!:D) I know deep down that I'm smart- I just seem to exhibit a lot of evidence to the contrary. :rolleyes: That stuff can really get to you after a while, you know?

sharon1175
09-15-08, 02:24 PM
Just read this article by Dr Kathleen Nadeau on Working with Gifted Adults with ADHD http://www.chesapeakeadd.com/pdf/adhd/gift_adults_adhd.pdf

I've massively underachieved academically, but I'm not lacking in talent or intellect. The inattentiveness makes it damn near impossible for me to knuckle down and work under my own steam outside of the classroom. I don't know how many times I started courses but was unable to get the homework assignments done.

How have other folks with Inattentive ADHD coped with this?

I pulled assignments out of my butt in school and later at work. Even today I'm dilly dallying and will likely cram later to make it look like I worked.

Having near gifted intelligence, I managed to skate by relatively unnoticed, but I notice it in myself and that is why I sought treatment. Just think of the things I could do if I could channel my intelligence properly!!!!

BTW - I start meds tomorrow (docs orders to wait) and am getting very impatient because I want to see if it helps me any.

bxny
09-15-08, 03:04 PM
I think its just easier to sneak through if you have a reserve to call upon when absolutely necessary. Having been a chronic procrastinator my entire life, I've now come to realize that, by putting off assignments till the last minute, the stress of limited time induced enough focus so that I could get my work done. I've always known that I never gave anything my best effort, but my half-*** attempts were usually good enough that no one (excluding myself) ever noticed I was struggling.

I've had a number of doctors (family doc's and ob/gyn's especially) question my pdoc's use of add meds by saying "how could you have made it this far if you were add?" Suggesting that 1) I couldn't have add doing the work that I do (I'm in academica) 2) and, for that reason, I'm somehow "cheating." This always feels just lovely.

Can'tregister
09-15-08, 03:19 PM
I've just been diagnosed as Inattentive and as preparation for the assesement read my old school reports then looked at Kathleen Nadeaus clinics website . A single paragraph managed to sum up my school and college experience ;

Other students with ADD (ADHD) continue to earn high grades through high school. While their grades may look good, their behind-the-scenes behaviors tell a different story of chronic anxiety, all-night study sessions, homework that takes hours longer than their gifted non-ADD(ADHD) counterparts, struggles with procrastination, and last-minute completion of papers and projects.

http://www.chesapeakeadd.com/adhd/gifted.html

I felt very sad at the lost opportunities after reading it although when I showed it to my doctor to try to get her to understand my experiences she was more interested in the information in the preceeding paragraphs that indicated for intelligent chidren with few hyperactive symptoms behaviour problems weren't usually an issue . She's very old school in that regard as far as her view of ADHD is concerned , its not her fault just the current view of ADHD here in the UK but hopefully that will begin to change once the NICE guidelines are distributed to doctors next month .

As to how I coped ( apart from leaving things to the last minute ) I often tended to become obsessive about finishing things or tunnel visioned as I used to describe it but that in turn was probably one of reasons why I developed chronic fatigue syndrome .Dominoes anyone ?

Grey Kameleon
09-15-08, 04:44 PM
Other students with ADD (ADHD) continue to earn high grades through high school. While their grades may look good, their behind-the-scenes behaviors tell a different story of chronic anxiety, all-night study sessions, homework that takes hours longer than their gifted non-ADD(ADHD) counterparts, struggles with procrastination, and last-minute completion of papers and projects.

It's that behind-the-scenes-ness that makes ADHD an invisible disability. I want to punch the next person who tells me that a 3.1 GPA is high and that I have nothing to worry about. The amount of time I spend just thinking about school is hardly worth it.

[/unsolicited rant]

Shai
09-15-08, 05:21 PM
I was salutatorian of my high school (class of 400ish), had really high test scores, etc., and was generally regarded as one of the best students my school had seen. What nobody realized was that I had absolutely no social life my last two years of high school. The number of times I got together with kids my age outside of school or school associated activities--zero. ALL I did was study, or try to study at least. My senior year this is what every day looked like. I'd get home from school, completely mentally exhausted (I was taking seven AP classes), and sleep until 6 or 7 PM. Then I'd put off my homework as much as possible, though not particularly doing anything while putting it off. Not watching TV, not playing video games, just waiting for the realization to come over me that the next day I had an essay due, 40 pages to read for a class, and two tests, and I hadn't even started to work or study. Then I'd reach borderline panic and start to focus. I skipped all the assignments that weren't mandatory, all reading, never wrote drafts or outlines of papers, and almost never studied for the tests. Around 10 PM I'd really get into gear, start writing my papers, doing assignments, applying to colleges (I applied to ten, and waited until the last minute for all of them). I'd generally finish around 3 AM, wake up the next day at 6 AM, and repeat. I'd study for tests and do simple assignments in classes or between classes. I NEVER took notes, ever, because I was always trying to finish assignments or cram for a test and because taking notes for me is extremely difficult.

So this is how I did extremely well in high school--by having no life whatsoever to compensate for my complete lack of organization and concentration. I managed the first couple years of college this way too, until I started to struggle. I've dropped so many classes it's ridiculous. I've changed majors at least four times, withdrawn from university twice. This whole time it never occurred to me that I could have ADHD, because first, I was not impulsive/disruptive (I'd never heard of inattentive ADD), and second, I had always been an excellent student (on paper). That seemed to exclude the diagnosis, so I thought I just needed to work harder.

I really wish I'd found out about ADHD sooner.

Pugly
09-15-08, 05:37 PM
I'm a gifted adult with likely inattentive adhd. I don't like saying that I'm gifted though, it sounds much too arrogant. And I certainly don't 'feel' gifted.

I largely flew under the radar at school. Was able to do much of the work with very little effort, especially in math... but my lack of detail and poor working memory tended to stifle my efforts in other subjects.

Even in college, I could get and handle most of my advanced math courses with very little effort. But then I hit a wall with the really advanced courses, and my mind couldn't handle the quick influx of new terminology, or memorizing previous results to help me work on new stuff. Which I tend to think if I was really gifted, I should have been able to manage this.

I haven't seen too much benefit to my 'giftedness', I just end up over thinking everything and talking about stuff on a level that others around me don't understand... and when I forget the advanced terminology due to my memory problems... I just end up sounding incoherent and confused.... not 'gifted'.

smittythepig
09-15-08, 05:52 PM
i was also in a gifted program in school. and up until high school did extremely well. then in high school and college things were much more of a struggle. it's hard to do well in more difficult courses when you don't do any of the reading and write your papers the night before they are due after glancing at some cliff's notes or reading a few chapter summaries, or you wait and try and study 3 months worth of material the night before the exam without decent notes or anything. still did ok but not great.

i've not been able to find a medication that's really helped me much. i read something interesting recently (but can't find the source now) that says that when people with higher intelligence treat their ADD with the usual meds, the results are often less than impressive. it's like the higher the intelligence the less dramatic the effect of the meds are. i think it was just one study that showed this but i wonder if that's why i haven't seen good results. i was thinking to myself before, "gosh, if i am supposedly smart but have ADD, imagine what I can accomplish with treatment." 3 or 4 different meds later and so far i'm better off not taking them.

at the moment the plan is to perhaps try another medication in the near future but also work on finding a career that i actually enjoy and maybe doesn't really on so many of the things that make life difficult for an ADD'er. the only problem with this is that i find the ADD causes problems in my home life as well - it's not just work. i'd like to find something that could help me deal with stress, depression, organizational and planning problems, anger issues and all of the other things that seem to be related to the ADD.

Prusilusken
09-15-08, 07:05 PM
Well, I didn't test "Gifted" on Wechslers test, just "Superior", but I think I get the gist.
I was always at the top of my classes, tested well especially when it came to liguistic subjects, but I couldn't do my homework, so when I was around 17-18 things started to come apart.
Until then, it was just one long string of all nighters, parents standing on my back to keep me at it, anxiety and despair and self loathing and downright fear of having to tell teachers that I didn't do - or just forgot to bring - my homework.

I'm also not fidgety and "too smart and ressourceful to have ADHD."
Which means I must be seriously lazy and crazy and on top of that of bad upbringing and not caring about lifting my own weight in the society, just let everyone else work for me. Well, if that's the case, why all those depressions? Why the poor self worth?
Oh yeah...BPD...cause that fits SO well compared to ADHD. ;)

Thanks for that article, it was a good read and "bullets for my ADHD gun" for when I eventually end up with a pdoc months from now.

andyum
09-15-08, 10:50 PM
I pulled assignments out of my butt in school and later at work. Even today I'm dilly dallying and will likely cram later to make it look like I worked.

That describes my behavior in school and work as well. I am almost paralyzed to complete any assignment until I absolutely, positively have to do it right then. Today was a good example as I had a grant application due at 5PM for the organization I run. I have known about the deadline for months but basically started it at 2PM today. Dropped it off at 4:58PM. I don't know if I would call myself gifted but I sure have a talent for pulling work out of my butt (as you so eloquently describe :)).

frankfarter
09-16-08, 11:43 AM
i can relate, it's something i am constantly dealing with. it's one of my huge hurdles. i know i am smart... maybe more than average. but my constant failures in school and work play tricks on my head making me feel im stupid. but im sure anyone you would talk to who knows me would say i am very intelligent, especially my mensa smart husband who got 94% on his lsats without even trying that hard. he always tells me he thinks im smart...

but i can't help but feel the contrary, it's been terrible on my self esteem.

smittythepig
09-16-08, 04:29 PM
i can relate, it's something i am constantly dealing with. it's one of my huge hurdles. i know i am smart... maybe more than average. but my constant failures in school and work play tricks on my head making me feel im stupid. but im sure anyone you would talk to who knows me would say i am very intelligent, especially my mensa smart husband who got 94% on his lsats without even trying that hard. he always tells me he thinks im smart...

but i can't help but feel the contrary, it's been terrible on my self esteem.


same here. on the one hand, friends and family say they think of me as smart (and not ADD). on the other hand, i am sure some of the people i work with think of me as totally ditzy and a slacker. there are times i do things and feel very good about what i've done and told i did a great job. the next day i might do something incredibly stupid. very inconsistent.

Retromancer
09-16-08, 05:40 PM
... and then there are those of us who didn't cope. There are many sidelined lives out there. Thankfully there will be fewer in the future as the word about the reality of inattentive ADD gets out -- but that is a small consolation for those like myself who were diagnosed late in life. There is no "reset" button in this life...

AD&D
09-16-08, 06:43 PM
Gifted, yet cursed.

I have a rich imagination, intelligent, emphatic and really skilled in art. But I've been trying to catch up all my life and when I finally get a break, I just collapse into a coma. My most predominant ambition has always been to have a piece of mind.

akko
09-17-08, 07:50 AM
Gifted, yet cursed.

I have a rich imagination, intelligent, emphatic and really skilled in art. But I've been trying to catch up all my life and when I finally get a break, I just collapse into a coma. My most predominant ambition has always been to have a piece of mind.

A piece of mind or a peace of mind? Or both? :p
You have a way with words. "Gifted yet cursed." A very poetic way of putting it!

I also feel like I'm playing catch-up with my life... So much time wasted pushing up against a wall.

AD&D
09-17-08, 09:23 AM
Peace of mind, that's it. :D

Can'tregister
09-19-08, 06:33 AM
I said in a previous post ;

Other students with ADD (ADHD) continue to earn high grades through high school. While their grades may look good, their behind-the-scenes behaviors tell a different story of chronic anxiety, all-night study sessions, homework that takes hours longer than their gifted non-ADD(ADHD) counterparts, struggles with procrastination, and last-minute completion of papers and projects.



It's that behind-the-scenes-ness that makes ADHD an invisible disability. I want to punch the next person who tells me that a 3.1 GPA is high and that I have nothing to worry about. The amount of time I spend just thinking about school is hardly worth it.

[/unsolicited rant]

I've been thinking about a suitable metaphor for this characteristic to get across my problems as a child to my GP when I next see her to discuss medication .

I thought its rather like a swan swimming upstream against a strong current glancing briefly the swan looks serene but beneath the surface is paddling frantically and making slow progress .

ArtfulDodger
09-19-08, 09:08 AM
Gifted, yet cursed.

I have a rich imagination, intelligent, emphatic and really skilled in art. But I've been trying to catch up all my life and when I finally get a break, I just collapse into a coma.

This is my story, too. :(

I was smart enough that I got by in high school with last minute homework and daydreaming through class without anyone noticing a problem, but couldn't cope with university with its emphasis on note-taking and long self-managed projects. I failed and dropped out for so many years before I finally managed to get a BA. Knowing how smart I was, I thought I must just be lazy... everyone would tell me as much. I realise now that if you're trying as hard as you can, you're not being lazy. Laziness requires intent.

I like the swan analogy. That works.

Retromancer
09-19-08, 10:39 AM
It seems in high school there was two groups of "bright but ADD" kids -- those who struggled to keep up with the march and those of us who fell behind. I was one of the stragglers. I left school at 16 and took my GED test. I could see no future for me. (Untreated depression was also part of the story...)

My adult working life has consisted of a string of semi-skilled entry level jobs. I am now a forty-something who is presently between jobs, waiting for the temp agency dispatcher to call.

As I noted earlier there is no reset button in this life. Can I be forgiven for having a wee attitude problem?

Azkary
09-19-08, 11:37 AM
As a child, now I realize, my ADHD wasn't diagnosed because I did good in school, never considered gifted but I got 'A's and 'B's in all the subjects, exept for math. Hated algebra.

My mom married my stepdad when I was 5 and we moved with him to California. I started Elementary school there and we moved a lot so I went to a different school every year up until high school, so my family blamed my lack of attentiveness and hyperactivity to the painful divorce my parents went through when I was 3, the new stepdad in my life and the school switching. ADHD just got lost somewhere and nobody noticed.

What bothers me now as an adult is that when people first meet me they don't take me seriously. My nicknames throughout school and all the way to my last jobs were always "wierdo", "loser" and stuff like that, but when I got into interesting conversations with somebody I always get comments like "you're smart, you just don't like to show it", or "I didn't think you were a person who actually reads" WTF...

Retromancer
09-19-08, 11:45 AM
I actually enjoy watching people doing a double-take when I make an informed observation -- while I am standing there in my working clothes, leaning on a broom. I have dubbed it the "talking dog effect"...

but when I got into interesting conversations with somebody I always get comments like "you're smart, you just don't like to show it", or "I didn't think you were a person who actually reads" WTF...

Azkary
09-19-08, 11:52 AM
I actually enjoy watching people doing a double-take when I make an informed observation -- while I am standing there in my working clothes, leaning on a broom. I have dubbed it the "talking dog effect"...


Hahaha, you're so right! It is amusing... :p

Can'tregister
09-19-08, 12:08 PM
I find that those who are most likely to underestimate my intelligence are often poorly educated and not terrible bright themselves especially if they are alpha males . I maybe a space cadet who can be slow on the uptake at times but it dosn't necessarily mean I am not perceptive nor well informed .

Prusilusken
09-19-08, 01:21 PM
I was at a boarding school for a year, and was instantly babtised "Stoney" because I had this "Mind/Brain synchronizing problem". My peers were not slow to notice my tendency to space out. At first, they thought I was a pothead, but at some point they found out that I'd never tried any drug in my entire life.
But they actually liked me from the beginning, and I liked to have a pet name, to be "someone" for once. And someone well liked and respected for different skills. The teachers also called me Stoney at the end of the year, can you believe it?
But no one suspected there could be anything wrong with me, though.

I made very descent grades, but the brightest and most engaged teachers knew that I didn't do any homework at all, and they used to tell me that if I just put in a minimum of effort, I'd have really excellent grades in ALL subjects instead of just great in some and above average in the worst ones.

I always came late, I always forgot something in my room, I always delivered paperwork late. And I did get a little, light scolding (which sat with me for years) everyonce in a while, but largely, these things were just accepted with maybe one raised eyebrow and a light headshake from my teachers because I really was a very nice student. Never made any problems, never confrinted my teachers.
So I had the "absentminded professor" treatment.
Sometimes when I was late or got lost at a very unpractical time (like on a trip to somewhere, where we had to catch a train or bus on the way back) they were mildly annoyed, but mostly, it was just *look at Lise, shrug and laugh while shaking head* because they somehow knew I did my best.

Retromancer: LOL "Talking Dog Effect" I know that one too well by now! :D

equilibrium
05-04-09, 03:35 AM
I just end up over thinking everything and talking about stuff on a level that others around me don't understand... and when I forget the advanced terminology due to my memory problems... I just end up sounding incoherent and confused.... not 'gifted'.

I feel like this every day of my life. I think the reason why I feel like I over think everything is because my mind reacts ("goes off") a million miles a minute, like flashes on a movie screen (clockwork orange? lol) ... might be solutions, ideas, things I now understand by seeing it, etc...Then you have this knowledge (or something you are supposed to "get out and prove" verbally and it all goes to s*%t. I have anxiety, and it is like this trigger that goes when I realize faster than I can actually think...I won't be able to "get it out" how I am expected to (verbally, logical order, etc)....the anxiety I think is a learned behviour from not knowing how to proceed...a defense mechanism (fear) instead of just feeling stupid....I can just worry about me being panicky, and not care about how dumb I sound. Okay, that might not make sense at all......

equilibrium
05-04-09, 03:48 AM
Am I gifted, I do not know yet. Well, I do...but for some reason I feel more comfortable thinking that I am crazy...or alien-like? Geez...to think that I am not the only one that is like this is really an eye-opener, a relief, a validation for my whole loosely constructed wavering sense-of-self.

I don't get great marks on tests...I don't care enough. I feel I could excel at a lot and everything if I had motivation. I have multiple "in my head" barriers-mod to severe inattentive, generalized anxiety dis and panic attacks, and major depression with mixed anxiety...I have this extreme musical brain and body and whole connection to music yet I have not tried really to play an instrument. We grew up (and now same position as lone parent) quite poor and didn't have the opportunities to try things, take classes, sports, etc. It is hard. This "creativity" side...like genuis beethoven type thing...that sits there...but not able to express it. Strange feeling. I think since I was a young child I felt like I was so different and very rarely meet someone like me. So, I have to say this to myself again....I am not crazy!

Retromancer
05-04-09, 04:41 AM
First off welcome to the forums equilibrium. You will find that your experiences are not that unusual here. You don't have to be crazy to post here -- but it helps!:D

I am a fellow member of the "Allegedly Gifted But Has F' All To Show For It" club. I too grew up poor -- in a family that put the 'fun' in dysfunctional. And I too get tongue-tied. Too much information trying to share the same channel. I'm one of the only people I know who needs footmarks when he speaks.

Am I gifted, I do not know yet. Well, I do...but for some reason I feel more comfortable thinking that I am crazy...or alien-like? Geez...to think that I am not the only one that is like this is really an eye-opener, a relief, a validation for my whole loosely constructed wavering sense-of-self.

I don't get great marks on tests...I don't care enough. I feel I could excel at a lot and everything if I had motivation. I have multiple "in my head" barriers-mod to severe inattentive, generalized anxiety dis and panic attacks, and major depression with mixed anxiety...I have this extreme musical brain and body and whole connection to music yet I have not tried really to play an instrument. We grew up (and now same position as lone parent) quite poor and didn't have the opportunities to try things, take classes, sports, etc. It is hard. This "creativity" side...like genuis beethoven type thing...that sits there...but not able to express it. Strange feeling. I think since I was a young child I felt like I was so different and very rarely meet someone like me. So, I have to say this to myself again....I am not crazy!

Michiko74
05-04-09, 09:27 AM
Most of the time I handed stuff in late, which meant of course I got points taken off. Even if I did hand stuff in on time, the quality of the work was at best mediocore. :o

Sometimes, there would be situations that scared to my bones and somehow that pressure enabled me to buckle down and get something done. And then there was the odd time I summoned all of my strength to concentrate and get a decent grade. But these are totally unsustainable situations. At least, I couldn't sustain them by myself.

hsoJ
05-04-09, 01:10 PM
Yeah, not sure about being technically "gifted", as I don't recall ever being tested or anything -- BUT, here is my story:

All through elementary school, I was a very very smart kid. I did exceptionally well through the 5th grade and things started to slip. I had never studied and never had to really TRY to do any of the work. I never paid any attention to the teachers, yet I still cranked out good work. Then I don't know what happened... I started a trend that still follows me in college studies. I'd do great in half of my subjects, while the other half was below satisfactory. Then they would flip-flop the next term. I still made it into the "beta club"/honors society type group -- though I stayed on probation most of the time.

High school was pretty much just a place I went to hang out and kill time before I came back home. I usually only did what homework I got done at school, because I'd forget how to do it by the time I got home... then have to re-teach myself how to do it on tests. My grades got worse and my procrastination increased and priorities were skewed. ALL my teachers always told me personally they knew I was a very intelligent person and saw so much potential in me if I would just "work harder", "buckle down", "pay better attention/to details"(you all know the list, I'm sure). They offered to stay after class just to help me reach my potential. Somehow I graduated with a "B" average. Relatives saw this too and assumed I was just a different sort of learner and that my common sense was ridiculously high and book-smarts -- not so much. My brother is the EXACT opposite, which exacerbates this idea. They also claim I'm just too bored with the learning material and pace of school.

*EDIT*: Just to throw it out there, I failed a few classes and had to re-take or pick up extra classes to compensate... for what it's worth.

College has... I'm not sure. I got into the "procrastinate and miss a day, then not go back because I can't stand to walk through the doors(for one reason or the other)" habit. Drive to school and sit in the car. I did well in online classes with long due dates and lenient profs though!

I'd love to get OFFICIALLY tested and diagnosed, but being unemployed and lacking insurance leaves much to be desired.


All in all; I was born in the wrong century. I would have been a great ancient philosopher/scientist [you know -- the ones that figured it all out for themselves].

equilibrium
05-04-09, 02:14 PM
hsoJ....
My experience with school much resembles what you describe. For the most part, I have difficulty with motivation and attention, and I "consume" a lot of information at once and then am terribly bored to pursue anything more because I have learned all I can -I would barely make it on to class, finish assignments, or I would just "forget"...although I would make it there-I would go grab coffee and do something else and then be like "wth, how can I forget going to my class?"... I think being "measured" for giftedness would be interesting although I would probably have lower scores strictly due to not being able to keep train of thought, anxiety, and general "rebellion" inside knowing that I am being tested-measured by another person's standards...

I crave going back to school but financially cannot afford it right now....I did some courses distance and online but I find I venture on to other neat things when I worked on the course. I need someone to be there to snap fingers at me every minute to help me stay on track...lol. Like everyone here, I guess!

I don't have the motivation for a lot of stuff unless I want to learn the info...consume it just for sake of needing new information/stimulation. I am not driven by materialist things, for praise or respect...I generally feel better (I hate focused attention just on me) blended in with the not-so's. If I had an internal driver...and I wanted something out of it...I think I would accomplish a lot. I just don't care to prove myself to anyone. I tend to focus more on relationships with people, animals, nature...lol.

You could always move here to Canada...we have pretty good health care (provincially) albeit it takes a LONG time for appts, testing, referrals, etc. Giftedness is still not mainstream enough and I believe gets overlooked all the time. For the long wait times -It would be better if we could offset them with private health care for those who can afford it or for "extended health" but that is for another discussion :)

Retromancer
05-04-09, 02:31 PM
I always liked Michael Moore's claim that he dropped out of college because he drove around and couldn't find anywhere to park!

College has... I'm not sure. I got into the "procrastinate and miss a day, then not go back because I can't stand to walk through the doors(for one reason or the other)" habit. Drive to school and sit in the car. I did well in online classes with long due dates and lenient profs though!

OntheFence
05-04-09, 02:45 PM
Coincidentally, I just created a thread called Good grades as a kid? Undiagnosed because of it? (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=67816)

I don't know if I'm gifted, but I got good grades my entire life, albeit with a lot of procrastination and poor organization. Like someone else said, I managed to pull stuff out of my a** a lot.

There have been times when I felt brilliant and insightful, but I just never seemed to be able to find an outlet for it. I feel like I have the mind of an artist, yet I don't have much "traditional" creative talent. It's like being in a mental prison.

I've always felt sort of out of place, especially when I got into the work force. I just felt like I was in handcuffs. I've hated most jobs, and now I severely hate corporate america in general. For the past 7 or 8 years, I've thought about different career options. Recently, I've decided to go into nursing and I'm taking some classes. I am fully prepared for the possibility that I might hate that too and end up back at square one, but I figure I've got to just shut my eyes and jump.

hsoJ
05-04-09, 03:00 PM
I always liked Michael Moore's claim that he dropped out of college because he drove around and couldn't find anywhere to park!



Yup! Been there and still have the $10 ticket from a year ago that I haven't gotten around to pay. Though, it's probably been sent to a collections agency by now and I most likely owe a lot more... but you know what they can do with that ticket???







Equil, I have to agree on the fact that I believe I'd definitely need some accommodations for a test of giftedness... but how well would non-gifted do if given extra time to think it out? That's all I need in life -- just a little extra thinkin' time.

cnicholls
05-04-09, 03:07 PM
I have ADHD and Have been on TV and in Popular Mechanics for projects that I have built. However I cant do this little crap the "Normal" people do. I have been without medication until this week.

If you want to see my projects its at www.chadsprojects.com (http://www.chadsprojects.com) is linking allowed?

ingenii_acies
05-04-09, 03:32 PM
I said in a previous post ;

Other students with ADD (ADHD) continue to earn high grades through high school. While their grades may look good, their behind-the-scenes behaviors tell a different story of chronic anxiety, all-night study sessions, homework that takes hours longer than their gifted non-ADD(ADHD) counterparts, struggles with procrastination, and last-minute completion of papers and projects.





I've been thinking about a suitable metaphor for this characteristic to get across my problems as a child to my GP when I next see her to discuss medication .

I thought its rather like a swan swimming upstream against a strong current glancing briefly the swan looks serene but beneath the surface is paddling frantically and making slow progress .


Yeah.... it was really embaressing and somewhat insensitive for me to tell people that I thought I had ADHD... I had a 4.1 GPA, yet I woudl go home and play video games and sometimes finish assignments the morning that it was due. I fit in quite well with my AP classmates and I also had multiple extracirriculars to keep me busy, such as marching band until 7PM and then Tae kwon Do/swimming/tennis lessons. Therefore if you actually calculated my schedule you would see that I never did really "study" for good amount of time.

When I hit college, I tried to do the same. But that actually required me to study, and thats when it felt like I was hit with a train, that I was not capable of satisfying my endless curiosities. I had to give up model building, martial arts, even my music career, which had been a large part of my identity. My relationship with my gf also failed as well, because I would never give her enough time or attention. My GPA started off my freshman year at a measly 2.7 in the field of bio sci. Needless to say this was when I felt my ADHD affect my life the most.

If not for my late diagnosis in my 4th year (upon which I was able to get 3.5+ GPAs for the last 3 quarters) and actually brought my GPA up, I wouldn't have been able to fix my friendships and relationships with my family and friends, as well as get a job and progress within it. But even on the meds, I still have to study just as hard if not harder, I think it just allows me to be more motivated and focused as opposed to trying to control my trains of thought.

Oddly enough, the inattentiveness is still there. I've just managed to train myself to funnel enough attention to my main focus while still being distracted or paying attention to other things.

ingenii_acies
05-04-09, 03:38 PM
Yeah, not sure about being technically "gifted", as I don't recall ever being tested or anything -- BUT, here is my story:

All through elementary school, I was a very very smart kid. I did exceptionally well through the 5th grade and things started to slip. I had never studied and never had to really TRY to do any of the work. I never paid any attention to the teachers, yet I still cranked out good work. Then I don't know what happened... I started a trend that still follows me in college studies. I'd do great in half of my subjects, while the other half was below satisfactory. Then they would flip-flop the next term. I still made it into the "beta club"/honors society type group -- though I stayed on probation most of the time.

High school was pretty much just a place I went to hang out and kill time before I came back home. I usually only did what homework I got done at school, because I'd forget how to do it by the time I got home... then have to re-teach myself how to do it on tests. My grades got worse and my procrastination increased and priorities were skewed. ALL my teachers always told me personally they knew I was a very intelligent person and saw so much potential in me if I would just "work harder", "buckle down", "pay better attention/to details"(you all know the list, I'm sure). They offered to stay after class just to help me reach my potential. Somehow I graduated with a "B" average. Relatives saw this too and assumed I was just a different sort of learner and that my common sense was ridiculously high and book-smarts -- not so much. My brother is the EXACT opposite, which exacerbates this idea. They also claim I'm just too bored with the learning material and pace of school.

*EDIT*: Just to throw it out there, I failed a few classes and had to re-take or pick up extra classes to compensate... for what it's worth.

College has... I'm not sure. I got into the "procrastinate and miss a day, then not go back because I can't stand to walk through the doors(for one reason or the other)" habit. Drive to school and sit in the car. I did well in online classes with long due dates and lenient profs though!

I'd love to get OFFICIALLY tested and diagnosed, but being unemployed and lacking insurance leaves much to be desired.


All in all; I was born in the wrong century. I would have been a great ancient philosopher/scientist [you know -- the ones that figured it all out for themselves].


You should take the meds somehow and find out how you do. I know some smart friends of mine who took the meds and they actually didn't benefit from it at all, only for the fact they could stay awake and tolerably attentive, but I didn't notice any changes. I guess when you have the normal amounts of dopamine in your system, it doesn't affect you as strongly. Imagine having 100 parts of dopamine and only like 120 receptors, when you add 40 parts to that it gets saturated so your increase up to 115-120 wouldn't be apparent. But if you had only like 60 parts of dopamine and you took 40, you'd have 100, but the difference is very readily apparent. And if anything, you'd trained yourself already to be somewhat focused so it would just enhance that training. Take this with a grain of salt though, I'm just paraphrasing it very very roughly and estimating it all.

One of the things I've noticed is that I love puzzles. Like sudoku, or brain games, riddles, trying to figure out things and why they are the way they are. I think people who are overly curious may have a correlation with this.

hsoJ
05-04-09, 06:08 PM
You should take the meds somehow and find out how you do. I know some smart friends of mine who took the meds and they actually didn't benefit from it at all, only for the fact they could stay awake and tolerably attentive, but I didn't notice any changes. I guess when you have the normal amounts of dopamine in your system, it doesn't affect you as strongly. Imagine having 100 parts of dopamine and only like 120 receptors, when you add 40 parts to that it gets saturated so your increase up to 115-120 wouldn't be apparent. But if you had only like 60 parts of dopamine and you took 40, you'd have 100, but the difference is very readily apparent. And if anything, you'd trained yourself already to be somewhat focused so it would just enhance that training. Take this with a grain of salt though, I'm just paraphrasing it very very roughly and estimating it all.

One of the things I've noticed is that I love puzzles. Like sudoku, or brain games, riddles, trying to figure out things and why they are the way they are. I think people who are overly curious may have a correlation with this.


Yeah, I've tried strattera, adderall, and vyvanse... back to a crappy generic adderall now and going to try dex soon if this stuff doesn't stable out any. I suppose I didn't include my vast medication history... I've taken too many pills to remember(anyone up for some instant gratification?) :o


Sorry about jacking the thread.

Alpha Cynic
05-04-09, 06:20 PM
I'm in the same boat with a lot of you. School was easy, then all of a sudden not so easy, then real life - that was xxxxing impossible.

Having to concentrate, focus, and perform, as directed, all day, 5 days a week, as the price of just continuing to exist? Terrifying. It still is. Then add the pressure to make friends and find a place in a random, tossing sea of strangers.

I regularly ask myself: Except for a few of the privileges of adulthood, who the hell would WANT to grow up?

As a result, I've been slacking my way thru for two decades now, and the guilt is now piled so high I'm having trouble seeing past it. Unless I get to off-load some of that guilt, there's no way I'm delivering on my real potential in this life.

Sometimes I feel I blew things off once too often and the world will be making me pay forever.

OntheFence
05-04-09, 06:55 PM
I'm in the same boat with a lot of you. School was easy, then all of a sudden not so easy, then real life - that was xxxxing impossible.

Having to concentrate, focus, and perform, as directed, all day, 5 days a week, as the price of just continuing to exist? Terrifying. It still is. Then add the pressure to make friends and find a place in a random, tossing sea of strangers.

I regularly ask myself: Except for a few of the privileges of adulthood, who the hell would WANT to grow up?

As a result, I've been slacking my way thru for two decades now, and the guilt is now piled so high I'm having trouble seeing past it. Unless I get to off-load some of that guilt, there's no way I'm delivering on my real potential in this life.

Sometimes I feel I blew things off once too often and the world will be making me pay forever.

Well said, especially the part about life after school! I thought that, just because I did well in school, that life would just sort of neatly unfold itself for me, and everything would fall into place....I'd get a well paying job with nice benefits, a wife, kids, a house w/ white picket fence, etc. After my second or third "real" job, I started asking myself, "What the hell is the point to all of this?" What you said about having to work at a boring job "just to continue to exist" is hilarious to me because I've thought exactly the same thing.

I think people with ADHD really need to be "into" what they do for a living. That's why I'm trying to reinvent myself right now by going back to school.

I never stopped and thought about what I actually wanted to do in life, and I blame myself for that. I also have feelings of guilt and regret because of the way things turned out. I feel like I missed the bus or something, like I never grew up.

I compare myself to other people I know, and I feel bad about where I'm at. They are all 100 miles ahead of me. I know it's really stupid to compare myself to other people. I try to not do that, but sometimes it just happens. Oh well...just gotta try and stay positive.

magdelaine
05-04-09, 07:29 PM
This was me, in the GATE program, honors English, honors History, etc. yet my grades were A's D's and F's. I participated in Academic Decathalon on the "C" team.

I can't express how strange I feel right now... I didn't have an inkling that it was anything other than lack of will and lazyness that has affected me all these years. I was diagnosed this week. I am still just floored that there are people "like me" out there! Absolutely amazed.

How did I miss ADD all these years? Maybe I can stop feeling guilty about all those missed opptys.

equilibrium
05-04-09, 10:34 PM
There have been times when I felt brilliant and insightful, but I just never seemed to be able to find an outlet for it. I feel like I have the mind of an artist, yet I don't have much "traditional" creative talent. It's like being in a mental prison.




Okay, that is exactly what I feel like. It's like I feel like I have had say a stroke and not knowing certain words anymore... It is like I know them, just forgotten and just can't access them for some reason.....a mental prison! I don't know if anyone understands that but it is exactly what I feel like everyday....frustrating.

coulditbeme
05-04-09, 10:47 PM
I was a lot like that too. I did well in school, but not nearly well enough. In college, I'd drink 10 cups of coffee a day. I think that was my minds way of telling me it was what i needed to try to concentrate. I'd leave assignments until the last minute and couldn't explain why. I'm in the process of getting help now.

My work life has been better as the pressure brings on concentration.

dntel
05-04-09, 11:02 PM
I was always told I was gifted when I was growing up. I was going through special programs for gifted children and ended up going through middle school and high school in special programs as well, with all honors or AP courses. The thing is that I never did well in school, maybe mediocre at best. The thought of ADD never really came across me, because up until college, I never once (honestly) put a serious mental effort into anything. I didn't read, complete assignments, or stayed awake in courses. I had hobbies and such, but mostly I always just gave in to my impulses which were all low on attentional strain. Fast forward to college where I decided that I wanted to put an effort into learning things and bettering myself, and wow I was really put into a reality check. I could not sit and read a book or stay awake during things such as lectures even with many many hours of rest. Around this time, I discovered caffeine (coffee) and immediately noticed a huge difference it made. With basically an around-the-clock high concentration of caffeine in my system, I was able to excel, graduating with a very high GPA and a GRE in the 99th percentile. When I think about this, I often wish that I could've maybe figured this out earlier in life, and certain of my traits would be different. I think my story is probably very similar to many people's. There's only a certain amount one can accomodate before realizing that a problem is there. Its unfortunate that this often goes unoticed because a person's individual potential is hidden behind whatever is displayed on the outside. Who can be blamed though? The system is pretty good as it is now, but it can get better. I hope for future kids who have ADHD pretty bad, but are able to get by because of their natural intelligence can be discovered and at least told of something like this, so their true potential can be awakened.

equilibrium
05-05-09, 12:49 AM
I am a fellow member of the "Allegedly Gifted But Has F' All To Show For It" club.........I'm one of the only people I know who needs footmarks when he speaks.





LMAO. These two things you mention have just made my day entirely!Thank you for the welcome! It is a conforting feeling finding out that I am not the only one who is so scattered when honestly trying not to be.

spaghettibrains
05-05-09, 01:36 PM
I actually enjoy watching people doing a double-take when I make an informed observation -- while I am standing there in my working clothes, leaning on a broom. I have dubbed it the "talking dog effect"...


I have had the same exact experiences, I have always been an anomaly. Somebody would say something And I would start rattling off facts :ie somebody said they were going to a benefit for someone with Lou Gehrics Disease. And I blurt out "amytrophic lateral sclerosis". I always get "how do you know that?"

I always said I would be a good poster boy for the United Negro College Fund. "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." Except I am white.

I was always told I was "book smart". I read medical and scientific journals like the Lancet, and British Medical Journal.The current swine flu epidemic fascinates me because I love epidemiology. Yet I can't even maintain a white trash lifestyle. A single wide trailer, a few rusted out cars in the front and some old washing machines and maybe a nice decrepit couch on the front porch. A $9 an hr job shoveling pig slop. Instead I go from a middle class truck driver salary to homeless and destitute. I have spent most of my life doing menial, mind numbing work.

Retromancer
05-05-09, 03:36 PM
At least there are now two consolations for we 'talking dogs':

1)The internet. As the now old joke goes "on the internet no one knows you're a dog". It does help with the isolation. Coming of age in pre-internet small town Missouri, I do envy the teens of today.

2)The diagnosis. At least we have the beginning of an explanation of why we are like we are and the hope that our lives can change -- for the better.

(Mentioning the UNCF may not be the most tactful thing to do ... but "a mind is a terrible thing to waste", whoever you may be. Do I need to say that classism is one of the last 'isms' that you will not be called on these days?)

Mike are you in Florida yet? I read this article and thought of you:

Economic casualties pile into tent cities | USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2009-05-04-new-homeless_N.htm)

It's starting to look like the Grapes of Wrath out there...


I have had the same exact experiences, I have always been an anomaly. Somebody would say something And I would start rattling off facts :ie somebody said they were going to a benefit for someone with Lou Gehrics Disease. And I blurt out "amytrophic lateral sclerosis". I always get "how do you know that?"

I always said I would be a good poster boy for the United Negro College Fund. "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." Except I am white.

I was always told I was "book smart". I read medical and scientific journals like the Lancet, and British Medical Journal.The current swine flu epidemic fascinates me because I love epidemiology. Yet I can't even maintain a white trash lifestyle. A single wide trailer, a few rusted out cars in the front and some old washing machines and maybe a nice decrepit couch on the front porch. A $9 an hr job shoveling pig slop. Instead I go from a middle class truck driver salary to homeless and destitute. I have spent most of my life doing menial, mind numbing work.

m1trLG2
05-27-09, 11:03 PM
Just read this article by Dr Kathleen Nadeau on Working with Gifted Adults with ADHD http://www.chesapeakeadd.com/pdf/adhd/gift_adults_adhd.pdf

I've massively underachieved academically, but I'm not lacking in talent or intellect. The inattentiveness makes it damn near impossible for me to knuckle down and work under my own steam outside of the classroom. I don't know how many times I started courses but was unable to get the homework assignments done.

How have other folks with Inattentive ADHD coped with this?

I tested at well over the "genius" mark... only reason I got into college was because I got a perfect score on my ACTs. I graduated college with a 2.48 :-(... thank you for ADD :-(. I could read stuff 100 times in college... couldn't make it stick for a test.

derbarkasmann
05-28-09, 12:06 AM
I'm in the same boat with a lot of you. School was easy, then all of a sudden not so easy, then real life - that was xxxxing impossible.

Having to concentrate, focus, and perform, as directed, all day, 5 days a week, as the price of just continuing to exist? Terrifying. It still is. Then add the pressure to make friends and find a place in a random, tossing sea of strangers.

I regularly ask myself: Except for a few of the privileges of adulthood, who the hell would WANT to grow up?

As a result, I've been slacking my way thru for two decades now, and the guilt is now piled so high I'm having trouble seeing past it. Unless I get to off-load some of that guilt, there's no way I'm delivering on my real potential in this life.

Sometimes I feel I blew things off once too often and the world will be making me pay forever.
Wow, this sounds familiar. I have always excelled on standardized tests, so my parents expected me to be an A student, which of course I wasn't, so I was branded as being lazy. I graduated Magna Cum Barely from university, and accomplished absolutely nothing in life except I was a good father to my son (single dad, of course, wife didn't stay). Procrastination has been crippling. Got diagnosed with Inattentive ADD two years ago at age 60. Now they tell me. Can't take stimulant meds because of heart rhythm problems, so they put me on Bupropion (generic Wellbutrin). The improvement is underwhelming, but there is some, I think. It's hard for me not to think about what I could have accomplished without this demon. And it's been painfully lonely. I knew a long time ago that my brain was in a thick fog and other people's brains didn't seem to be, but no solution I pursued ever worked. And I could never, ever keep my mouth shut, this goes back to elementary school, and has cost me friendships and relationships and jobs. Still struggle with that one. Now that more is known, maybe children with this won't have to go through what a lot of us have, that's my hope, anyway. And I'm really glad I found this community.

Schroeder
05-28-09, 12:05 PM
Just read this article by Dr Kathleen Nadeau on Working with Gifted Adults with ADHD http://www.chesapeakeadd.com/pdf/adhd/gift_adults_adhd.pdf

I've massively underachieved academically, but I'm not lacking in talent or intellect. The inattentiveness makes it damn near impossible for me to knuckle down and work under my own steam outside of the classroom. I don't know how many times I started courses but was unable to get the homework assignments done.

How have other folks with Inattentive ADHD coped with this?

I just have to say, LOL @ your signature:

Suspected ADHD Inattent... ooh shiny!

:D:D:D

Schroeder
05-28-09, 12:09 PM
I was always told I was "book smart". I read medical and scientific journals like the Lancet, and British Medical Journal.The current swine flu epidemic fascinates me because I love epidemiology. Yet I can't even maintain a white trash lifestyle. A single wide trailer, a few rusted out cars in the front and some old washing machines and maybe a nice decrepit couch on the front porch. A $9 an hr job shoveling pig slop. Instead I go from a middle class truck driver salary to homeless and destitute. I have spent most of my life doing menial, mind numbing work.

Funny how this works, we're very bright and yet we struggle with being glued to menial, repetitive jobs, which are the MOST FRUSTRATING THING to us. The irony...:rolleyes:

Schroeder
05-28-09, 12:10 PM
I tested at well over the "genius" mark... only reason I got into college was because I got a perfect score on my ACTs. I graduated college with a 2.48 :-(... thank you for ADD :-(. I could read stuff 100 times in college... couldn't make it stick for a test.

Yup, I hear that. Although you're doing better with me, I'm floating around a 2.0 GPA lol. Terrible. I can understand the material no sweat, when I'm able to pay attention, but it somehow leaks out of the old memory bucket when I have to take a test :p

chellechelle
05-28-09, 12:48 PM
I was tested when i was in grade three for giftedness and passed with so called flying colours. this test was also repeated when i entered highschool with the same results. i also have adhd. jsut because your are gifted does not take away the effects of the adhd. i still could not concentrate on my work or sit still during class. in the end i did nothing in class and did all my work at home. the only differnce that being gifted gives you is how you learn. you learn more by yourself it is in the way your grasp and interpret the information. i could do entire essays etc. in a half hour and get close to perfect grades.. but only if it was done out of the class environment. inside class i waas a normal high hyperactivity adhd child

elvenkayt
06-09-09, 02:02 PM
I have a similar story to most of you. I usually managed to pull of As and Bs in high school, but I had to talk the school district out of expelling me because I missed so much school. I hated having to go to school, because I always would be soooo bored and fall asleep during class.
When I got to college, I went downhill immediately. The big projects I had to do would just paralyze and overwhelm me. I actually had to go to class to succeed, so I ended up with only a 2.0 my first semester and lost my scholarship. I decided I wouldn't waste any more time or money and dropped out.
Later, I joined the Navy and had to learn about running the nuclear reactors. It was a fast-paced, high pressure program, so I was an emotional basket-case throughout the whole program (1 1/2 years). I would often get overwhelmed with the amount of stuff I had to learn in such a short time. At this time, ephedra was legal, so this helped with the falling asleep during class. I ended up standing in the back of the class most of the time anyway, cause I still would be so bored. In this program, I did very well academically, but the coping methods to get through the program were not healthy at all.
After I got out of the Navy, I decided to go back to school. It had been suggested by a friend that I might have ADHD, but I always kind of scoffed at it, cause I wasn't at all hyperactive. After doing a little research, I found out about Inattentive ADHD. My family reacted by saying, "You were always so good in school, you can't have ADHD." Even after I sent them information, they still just think that I'm making it up or faking it.
They just don't understand how hard it is for me to just get by in school, much less make good grades. And, as was mentioned in another post, I feel so guilty about it. There are so many things that I should be doing, but never get around to, so I sit and fret and feel guilty about it and it never gets started.
I was on Strattera for a while, but it tore up my stomach, so I'm waiting to see the doc again to see what my other options are.
Sorry for the book, but I'm very glad that this thread was started. I don't feel like such a freak anymore, knowing that others are feeling the same way.
So thank you all for sharing. :-)

HypnicJerk
06-09-09, 05:08 PM
This all sounds so weirdly similar. I too did well in school--Summa Cum Laude (whatever) from a top journalism school. (For one who always dreamed of reporting from the Amazon, Everest or from some war-torn country to end up in a tiny cubicle in his first job...) Outside in the working world I put so much pressure on myself to succeed that I always did the exact opposite in the end. I'd get hired onto what I felt to be the perfect job, one I truly wanted, and then early on--say during my 90 day "probation" period or more (my State, County, City gov't gigs)--I would underperform miserably. I could not learn or do said job worth a dammm. It got to the point that I would end up quitting just because I was afraid I'd fail in the end and I couldn't handle that. No one, myself included, could figure me out--to try so hard and get one job and then just walk away from it.

On the opposite side, I'd get a bogus job. Then I would ask myself if I saw myself there in X years. Of course I'd tell myself no and become so miserable there and in the "here and now" I'd have to bail or drive myself and those I loved mad. And then, I'd get a "fun" job (that summer surf instructor where I threw my body into it with everything I got) but wound up with a herniated disc that ironically forced myself back into the office world in the end. Last time I counted, I had 16 jobs in 12 years--and I've held my current one for past 3 of them, yikes.

chamaleon
06-09-09, 05:19 PM
haha, i am NOT gifted. was a pretty good student but by no means 'gifted,' and i think academia is overrated anyway....

i got a good sense of humour though!!! :)

Schroeder
06-09-09, 05:26 PM
This all sounds so weirdly similar. I too did well in school--Summa Cum Laude (whatever) from a top journalism school. (For one who always dreamed of reporting from the Amazon, Everest or from some war-torn country to end up in a tiny cubicle in his first job...) Outside in the working world I put so much pressure on myself to succeed that I always did the exact opposite in the end. I'd get hired onto what I felt to be the perfect job, one I truly wanted, and then early on--say during my 90 day "probation" period or more (my State, County, City gov't gigs)--I would underperform miserably. I could not learn or do said job worth a dammm. It got to the point that I would end up quitting just because I was afraid I'd fail in the end and I couldn't handle that. No one, myself included, could figure me out--to try so hard and get one job and then just walk away from it.

On the opposite side, I'd get a bogus job. Then I would ask myself if I saw myself there in X years. Of course I'd tell myself no and become so miserable there and in the "here and now" I'd have to bail or drive myself and those I loved mad. And then, I'd get a "fun" job (that summer surf instructor where I threw my body into it with everything I got) but wound up with a herniated disc that ironically forced myself back into the office world in the end. Last time I counted, I had 16 jobs in 12 years--and I've held my current one for past 3 of them, yikes.

Yeah why is this? It's like 100% of our problems are internal, not external. Most people perceive people/events/the world going against them, but we can fly past that no problem, I guess thanks to the "gifted" aspect. But then we self-sabotage ourselves. What the heck lol.

Starscreem
06-09-09, 05:41 PM
... and then there are those of us who didn't cope. There are many sidelined lives out there. Thankfully there will be fewer in the future as the word about the reality of inattentive ADD gets out -- but that is a small consolation for those like myself who were diagnosed late in life. There is no "reset" button in this life...

Amen to that! If i had the meds I do now, and the knowledge about ADD that I do now High School and College would have been soo much different!

Gifted, yet cursed.

I have a rich imagination, intelligent, emphatic and really skilled in art. But I've been trying to catch up all my life and when I finally get a break, I just collapse into a coma. My most predominant ambition has always been to have a piece of mind.

I feel the same way. I feel that I am totally a out side the box thinker. I am puzzle solver and love the challenge of the riddle! I love music a good song can inspire me to no ends! I cook, draw, paint, build along with other art type things very well!

I think having ADD has allowed me to be more artistic and imaginative then my non-ADD counter parts in school and life.

TheHenry
06-09-09, 11:27 PM
Wow, this has been a great topic to come across. Throughout middle and high school I had a few teachers tell me that I might have ADD, but I always felt that such comments were insulting (as far as I knew ADD was something that landed you in special ed.)

Since I didn't understand ADD, and I generally got A's and B's in accelerated classes, I never thought that it was even in the most remote realm of possibilities that I might have it. However, when I had a truly terrible midterm grade in one of my classes, the teacher for that class whom I greatly respected told me that it hurt her to see me always missing assignments and struggling to do things on time when she knew I cared a lot about my academics. She suggested (in what I felt to be a very non-insulting way) that I might have ADD, and that finally got me to go to the psychiatrist, and I'm so thankful for it.

It's honestly a bizarre struggle to have ADD when you're gifted. I wanted to see if I could go to college unmedicated, but I ended out pulling multiple all-nighters a week in order to get assignments complete; I'd spend so much time in my room not-doing homework but trying to, and I don't think I read a single thing assigned (with the exception of cramming). But after a semester of sleep deprivation and getting depressed about my horrendous study habits, I still got good grades. I'm back on medication now, and it helps so much, but sometimes I feel like I'm cheating (since Adderall seems to be used more often to cheat in college than it's used as it should be). I have to remind myself that I'm not taking Adderall to get better grades, but that I'm taking it to be able to deal with life's demands without almost killing myself in the process.

Now when I look at my life in retrospect, I've pretty obviously had ADD the entire time. But whenever I disclose to somebody that I have ADD, I'm almost always faced with skepticism, and sometimes it even makes me doubt myself. I guess I've got to keep it in mind that ADD isn't about what you do, it's how you do it. Even if I got an A on an essay, I still stayed up all night procrastinating and wrote half of the thing in the class before it was due.

Do any other people have a tough time with feeling guilty about being medicated (or other help received as a result of being ADD)?

musicman64
06-10-09, 03:28 AM
tested in to the gifted program in the 3rd grade. I never thought I belonged there because everybody around me was earning high grades and I was struggling just to get by. Of course I know understand that ADD was a serious problem for me and I just did nothing about it. Of course it was not in vogue to do something about it when I was young

Schroeder
06-10-09, 09:39 AM
tested in to the gifted program in the 3rd grade. I never thought I belonged there because everybody around me was earning high grades and I was struggling just to get by. Of course I know understand that ADD was a serious problem for me and I just did nothing about it. Of course it was not in vogue to do something about it when I was young

I just don't think many people, if any, had ever heard about ADHD-I. Heck, I never even knew ADHD-I existed (and I'm 26!) until last month! I always identified with so many of the normal ADHD symptoms, except for the physical hyperactivity and thrill-seeking stuff - I was the total opposite, very mellow and laid-back.

I saw plenty of psychiatrists and exactly zero of them were helpful. It's not their fault; it's just not something that was widely recognized, and even now, the ADHD-I resources available now say that medication only helps 30% of sufferers in clinical tests, so there's not really even a good course of action to go on for treatment aside.

Schroeder
06-10-09, 10:21 AM
Wow, this has been a great topic to come across. Throughout middle and high school I had a few teachers tell me that I might have ADD, but I always felt that such comments were insulting (as far as I knew ADD was something that landed you in special ed.)

Since I didn't understand ADD, and I generally got A's and B's in accelerated classes, I never thought that it was even in the most remote realm of possibilities that I might have it. However, when I had a truly terrible midterm grade in one of my classes, the teacher for that class whom I greatly respected told me that it hurt her to see me always missing assignments and struggling to do things on time when she knew I cared a lot about my academics. She suggested (in what I felt to be a very non-insulting way) that I might have ADD, and that finally got me to go to the psychiatrist, and I'm so thankful for it.

It's honestly a bizarre struggle to have ADD when you're gifted. I wanted to see if I could go to college unmedicated, but I ended out pulling multiple all-nighters a week in order to get assignments complete; I'd spend so much time in my room not-doing homework but trying to, and I don't think I read a single thing assigned (with the exception of cramming). But after a semester of sleep deprivation and getting depressed about my horrendous study habits, I still got good grades. I'm back on medication now, and it helps so much, but sometimes I feel like I'm cheating (since Adderall seems to be used more often to cheat in college than it's used as it should be). I have to remind myself that I'm not taking Adderall to get better grades, but that I'm taking it to be able to deal with life's demands without almost killing myself in the process.

Now when I look at my life in retrospect, I've pretty obviously had ADD the entire time. But whenever I disclose to somebody that I have ADD, I'm almost always faced with skepticism, and sometimes it even makes me doubt myself. I guess I've got to keep it in mind that ADD isn't about what you do, it's how you do it. Even if I got an A on an essay, I still stayed up all night procrastinating and wrote half of the thing in the class before it was due.

Do any other people have a tough time with feeling guilty about being medicated (or other help received as a result of being ADD)?

I just don't tell people I have ADHD-I. It's too complicated, and you always get that knee-jerk reaction "well everyone has a hard time with doing things sometimes". Yeah, but it's not your whole freaking life! :mad:

People just don't get it :rolleyes:

Retromancer
06-10-09, 04:28 PM
Welcome to life with a neuro-psychiatric disorder. The good news is that there are positive actions you can take irregardless of how effective the medication is. As the saying goes "Pills are not skills". Check the "stickies" on the forum here -- and ask forum members. There is a number of good sites with how-to information.

Before I say any thing more I will note I am not 'anti-medication' in fact I am taking a stimulant medication right now. Having said that I have to ask: If ADDers did not respond to stimulants as they do, how would AD(H)D be treated? My hunch is that AD(H)D would be treated more like a learning disability and less like a psychiatric disorder.

I am tempted to say that may well be a better outcome than the present. I do believe there is an obsessive pre-occupation with medication...

I saw plenty of psychiatrists and exactly zero of them were helpful. It's not their fault; it's just not something that was widely recognized, and even now, the ADHD-I resources available now say that medication only helps 30% of sufferers in clinical tests, so there's not really even a good course of action to go on for treatment aside.

Schroeder
06-10-09, 05:42 PM
Welcome to life with a neuro-psychiatric disorder. The good news is that there are positive actions you can take irregardless of how effective the medication is. As the saying goes "Pills are not skills". Check the "stickies" on the forum here -- and ask forum members. There is a number of good sites with how-to information.

Before I say any thing more I will note I am not 'anti-medication' in fact I am taking a stimulant medication right now. Having said that I have to ask: If ADDers did not respond to stimulants as they do, how would AD(H)D be treated? My hunch is that AD(H)D would be treated more like a learning disability and less like a psychiatric disorder.

I am tempted to say that may well be a better outcome than the present. I do believe there is an obsessive pre-occupation with medication...

Hah I like that bit about pills & skills. I'm not against pills in general as a form of treatment, because there are people that need them and who they do help; I just don't feel like they're the right answer for me personally (at least not that I've found yet!) because of my own experiences with them. Yeah, they do help in some areas, but mostly they just make me feel weird - something I don't really need compounded on everything else I'm dealing with, lol. If there was a magic pill that somehow fixed my motivation and focus problems and didn't have any side effects, I'd be popping those in a heartbeat!

Right now my focus is on behavioral modification self-therapy - figuring out ways to beat my brain at it's own game so that I can be successful :D The first answer I've discovered is that I simply have to try harder than other people - once I get on track, I do great work, but of course getting on track and staying there is the real problem here. Here's what I've got so far:

1. Early bedtime is a BIG deal
2. Clean diet every day is a BIG deal
3. Exercising for 15 minutes really helps (boosts energy + helps me fall asleep)
4. Defining and living by a Routine is a HUGE deal
5. Organizational Support System: "Getting Things Done" by David Allen is helping tremendously - it's a very strict system to follow, one that doesn't allow for leaks, which happens if I try to keep things in my brain or on random papers. It both helps you be organized and get things done. Ignore the bloggers (there's alot of buzz about this system) and just adopt the system as-is (most people who talk about it, don't do it 100%).
6. Convergence insufficiency: (this may be unique to me & just a subset of ADHD-I/SCT'ers) I was diagnosed with this eye problem and will be going back to hit vision therapy hard this month.
7. Working memory training: Cogmed & other systems look very promising, but I haven't read too many reports of long-term results. I'm not spending $2,000 unless I know for sure it works, but this "working memory" stuff looks like a good route to follow if training really does help.

So far the thing that has given me the best results is a super early bedtime. This really helps me think clearer during the day. Nothing else has come close as far as consistent good results.

Forgot where I was going with this, so that's it for this post! :D

Mole Rat
06-11-09, 12:58 AM
A lot of these posts resonate with me. I'm gifted in art. I was the art teachers' "pet" as a child. I've managed to earn a degree in fine art. In my five years of college I failed 2 classes but by the end I had mostly A's. I procrastinated with 99% of all assignments and exam studying. On the rare occasion that I actually finished a project before the morning of the due date and got a good sleep, I felt like I'd conquered the world. On many occasions I'd procrastinate, like many have said here, to a ridiculous degree - waiting until the very last second in which I knew I HAD to start the assignment or else I wouldn't get it done in time (resulting in many close calls and a few "sick days.") I don't need to tell any of you how great all-nighters are for the health. Though I'd pass my assignments in with regularity and get good marks there was always the knowledge of what it took just to produce it, and how much better it could have been had I been able to start it before 4 AM.
I think a lot of the problem with art school was that none of it interested me...my parents urged me to go to art school and, lacking a "big picture" of life, I went along with it, without thinking if it was what I really wanted. I've since found a few art related things I REALLY care about such as interior design...this and the other things, I could do forever.

The appearance of success is a problem. I recently told my brother about my suspicions about ADHD and he said "but you do so well." Well no I don't....good grades are good but where is the quality in life when your life is ruled by procrastination and you think about harming yourself on a regular basis (don't be concerned - I would never - but I don't want to think about doing it!). And I look like I have friends and I do but the only friends I actually hang out with are people who are former roommates...people I'm highly comfortable with. I'm terrified to let anyone else in.

I've done really well in the jobs I've had, especially the ones involving a certain amount of variety/stimulation; there's an initial period of confusion but as soon as the routines are clear I am an extremely valued worker. I guess you could say that I'm successful in that regard; I can hold a job; but I am currently unemployed and there is nothing crappier than KNOWING a potential employer would find me indispensable, but blowing the interview because it's being conducted in the middle of a room full of people doing things and I keep blanking out. And I know I have the talents to build a career out of myself, but with no set schedule as you have with a regular job, my life falls apart.

I find it interesting that so many have mentioned being good at art. In the Wiki article on SCT, there is a quote by an Adele Diamond:
"language problems often co-occur with ADD, and it is suggested that part of the reason might be that linguistic tasks, especially verbal ones, tax working memory so heavily. Spatial and artistic skills, however, are often preserved or superior in individuals with ADD."

Schroeder
06-11-09, 01:06 AM
I find it interesting that so many have mentioned being good at art. In the Wiki article on SCT, there is a quote by an Adele Diamond:
"language problems often co-occur with ADD, and it is suggested that part of the reason might be that linguistic tasks, especially verbal ones, tax working memory so heavily. Spatial and artistic skills, however, are often preserved or superior in individuals with ADD."

Hmm, interesting...I'm good at art and really enjoy it as well. Of course, I failed art class because I kept procrastinating my assigments and not turning them in :D

EveningMan
06-11-09, 06:12 AM
Why is this thread in the inattentive section? Are ADHD-I's more prone to giftedness than their hyperactive ADHD mates?

Annwn
06-11-09, 10:26 AM
Why is this thread in the inattentive section? Are ADHD-I's more prone to giftedness than their hyperactive ADHD mates?

Whether there are statistics or not, "giftedness" is not exclusive to ADHD - inattentive or otherwise.

Retromancer
06-11-09, 11:50 AM
Go start one for the hyperactive mates -- elsewhere. Our experience is different. Part of the "primarily inattentive" experience is not having that surplus of energy that the hyperactive have to see that their dreams become reality.

Why is this thread in the inattentive section? Are ADHD-I's more prone to giftedness than their hyperactive ADHD mates?

Azoox
06-11-09, 12:37 PM
I have this extreme musical brain and body and whole connection to music yet I have not tried really to play an instrument.

Yes, that is precisely one of my issues. I've always been described and referred to as a person with a perfect hearing and a musical ear. I'm good at languages and can speak them with little next to no foreign accent audible. I can imitate them pretty well, I guess. I love singing, too! Yet...

Azoox
06-11-09, 02:24 PM
... ADD isn't about what you do, it's how you do it...

I couldn't agree more. Besides, ADD is only a word, a medical term for something that can only be there if we locate it in the right context. It is negative ONLY if we're in an environment where constant attention and productivity are the basic functions, which is precisely what ADD prevents happening/occurring. Try to think of yourself as a zen master or a shepherd or someone who has an option of living more in sync with nature than in the "corporate," neoliberal, global-market-driven society, for an instance. ADD has virtually no significance there--it probably doesn't even exist there. Also, such great inventions as the Internet, TV, cell phones, and other related products only ADD (pun partly intended lol) to the issue. My take on all this is as follows: once you're diagnosed, you know, you are aware that you have this condition. It may suck because of its particularly insidious nature, but once you're past that thought, ADD is really no different from being allergic to pollen or having to avoid salt because of your high blood pressure or zillions of other conditions. It is a CONDITION. Don't overthink it; don't go beyond being aware. I feel like overthinking, which can be part of inattentive ADD, should seriously be dealt with in itself almost as a separate entity: I know that I can dissect my mental condition so perfectly that my friends sometimes take me for a psychologist, but it's a fast track to identification with the condition, which then creates all the hurt, regret, anguish, anxiety, and even depression. As a result, I try not to get overwhelmed with the thought; instead, I like to focus on what it is I can do in each moment so as to improve my condition. Have you ever tried breathing, for instance? Or taking a quick walk? A simple stretching exercise? Life is a series of moments, so maybe tackling it moment by moment will make everything more bearable, manageable, pleasant, and ultimately effective.
So, to sum it up: once you know you have it, accept the status quo, and act on what you know. Stop living in the past, don't make any excuses, and learn to be present at all times. Quieting your mind is the way to go. And maybe then even in the jobs we have we can find our own unique way of doing them so that the material gets tailored to our condition rather than us trying to bend over backwards all the time. Why not try at least? Definitely cannot hurt more than the latter ;-) What do you think?

ADDitor :-)

P.S. By the way, I'm sorry if all the above sounds too idealistic to some of you. I didn't mean it to be idealistic but rather realistic. The same way we can control anger and emotions in general, I do believe we can also control the way we approach ADD. Demonizing it only gives the condition even more power, strengthens our shackles, and purges us of the energy we can use otherwise. As the quote above states, it is not what we do, but HOW.

P.P.S. Not that I complain, but to those of you who think that ADD alone is terrifying as is, let me say that I deal with a great lifetime cocktail of inADDentive+perfectionism+passive aggression (I'll keep the proportions to myself lol) Bottoms up, everyone! ;)

Retromancer
06-11-09, 02:35 PM
Kudos on using "neoliberal" in a post -- and no, I'm not being sarcastic or ironic!



I couldn't agree more. Besides, ADD is only a word, a medical term for something that can only be there if we locate it in the right context. It is negative ONLY if we're in an environment where constant attention and productivity are the basic functions, which is precisely what ADD prevents happening/occurring. Try to think of yourself as a zen master or a shepherd or someone who has an option of living more in sync with nature than in the "corporate," neoliberal, global-market-driven society, for an instance. ADD has virtually no significance there--it probably doesn't even exist there. Also, such great inventions as the Internet, TV, cell phones, and other related products only ADD (pun partly intended lol) to the issue. My take on all this is as follows: once you're diagnosed, you know, you are aware that you have this condition. It may suck because of its particularly insidious nature, but once you're past that thought, ADD is really no different from being allergic to pollen or having to avoid salt because of your high blood pressure or zillions of other conditions. It is a CONDITION. Don't overthink it; don't go beyond being aware. I feel like overthinking, which can be part of inattentive ADD, should seriously be dealt with in itself almost as a separate entity: I know that I can dissect my mental condition so perfectly that my friends sometimes take me for a psychologist, but it's a fast track to identification with the condition, which then creates all the hurt, regret, anguish, anxiety, and even depression. As a result, I try not to get overwhelmed with the thought; instead, I like to focus on what it is I can do in each moment so as to improve my condition. Have you ever tried breathing, for instance? Or taking a quick walk? A simple stretching exercise? Life is a series of moments, so maybe tackling it moment by moment will make everything more bearable, manageable, pleasant, and ultimately effective.
So, to sum it up: once you know you have it, accept the status quo, and act on what you know. Stop living in the past, don't make any excuses, and learn to be present at all times. Quieting your mind is the way to go. And maybe then even in the jobs we have we can find our own unique way of doing them so that the material gets tailored to our condition rather than us trying to bend over backwards all the time. Why not try at least? Definitely cannot hurt more than the latter ;-) What do you think?

ADDitor :-)

P.S. By the way, I'm sorry if all the above sounds too idealistic to some of you. I didn't mean it to be idealistic but rather realistic. The same way we can control anger and emotions in general, I do believe we can also control the way we approach ADD. Demonizing it only gives the condition even more power, strengthens our shackles, and purges us of the energy we can use otherwise. As the quote above states, it is not what we do, but HOW.

P.P.S. Not that I complain, but to those of you who think that ADD alone is terrifying as is, let me say that I deal with a great lifetime cocktail of inADDentive+perfectionism+passive aggression (I'll keep the proportions to myself lol) Bottoms up, everyone! ;)

EveningMan
06-11-09, 05:31 PM
Your post is very interesting, I just don't understand:

ADD has virtually no significance there--it probably doesn't even exist there. Where, the corporate world?

Also, such great inventions as the Internet, TV, cell phones, and other related products only ADD (pun partly intended lol) to the issue.ADD what?

Thanks

EveningMan
06-11-09, 05:34 PM
Go start one for the hyperactive mates -- elsewhere. Our experience is different. Part of the "primarily inattentive" experience is not having that surplus of energy that the hyperactive have to see that their dreams become reality.

Was just asking because of the title, no inattentiveness was mentioned there.

Azoox
06-11-09, 07:10 PM
Your post is very interesting, I just don't understand:

Where, the corporate world?

ADD what?

Thanks

Sure.

a) The "there" stands for the corporate world or wherever it is that attention is expected from and imposed upon us. We don't have any problems focusing on what we're drawn to naturally after all.

b) All modern forms of technology ADD immensely to the already huge world of noise and distractions around us--our enemy no. 1. I, for instance, work with full-screen formats of documents wherever possible in order to prevent any other forms of distractions in my computer.

I hope that clarifies my point. I also wonder how others cope with their condition on an everyday basis.

equilibrium
06-12-09, 02:08 PM
I am frustrated.

Aren't IQ tests for people to test knowledge but really it is about factual information? I am not sure how or what it tests like...say a comparable adult female like myself.

I know I am different, and not just in terms of my current (ongoing) assessment/diagnosis of Adhd. Not necessarily gifted, but definitely qualities of. I know I have abilities that are beyond normal that I cannot describe verbally--but not necessarily that of trivia, factual information...my problem is that if it is something is then of not enough interest to me, or nothing to "know"...my mind will not bother with it.

I know, confusing. It is like...I don't want to bother being tested because ultimately I know it is testing, and I have real issues and biases with it.

I am excited,and hoping that my first trial of meds (upcoming) help with sustaining my attention: then I can learn learn learn learn learn. I would focus wow....I can't wait. I want to teach myself how to play guitar, piano, take classes and courses, and paint and write, and be active and love life. I have this fear of achieving though, accomplishing...like an ingrained helplessness due to having to not feel disappointed with myself for being an underachiever when I know I am very smart, very much in love with learning (EVERYTHING)...hmm...my thoughts for the day!


Okay, I just reread parts of my post and I was totally off a tangent about IQ tests hahaha. Feels so out of place, my post!

equilibrium
06-12-09, 02:11 PM
I know deep down that I'm smart- I just seem to exhibit a lot of evidence to the contrary. :rolleyes: That stuff can really get to you after a while, you know?


Yes, I completely understand this. I feel like, well now I have to prove that I am average when I know I am not. Ie/screw things up...lol. Like WTH is that!!?

DIYGeekChic
06-12-09, 05:20 PM
My teachers when I was in school begged my parrents to let me be in the gifted programs ALMOST as much as they started letters home with, "Ryan is so smart and talented. He contributes more in class-discussion time than the whole class combined and his test scores are amazing, but he never turns in his work and is always daydreaming in class."

EveningMan
06-12-09, 05:56 PM
b) All modern forms of technology ADD immensely to the already huge world of noise and distractions around us--our enemy no. 1.While I am actually quite good with computers, I don't get much accomplished with them. Much less than they have the potential for. The internet is a distraction, but even without it, a computer offers more than enough opportunities for time wasting. Like rearranging files and folders over and over, changing settings, trying a new program.

So, while I am in a way talented for the computer, I am not really made for it. I think I have a problem it's two dimensional and virtual, not three-dimensional and tangible.

I hope that clarifies my point. I also wonder how others cope with their condition on an everyday basis.Because of my above observations, I am longing for the fix-wired technology before the age of the PC. Can't go completely back to it, but actually right now I am trying a new approach. I am stripping my laptop of anything but the absolute necessary. I switched to Windows classic look, cleaned up the machine, have very few folders, few programs, restricted internet access.

I want the main account to have no adminstrative privileges and as little rights as possible, to keep the possibilities of rearranging anything near to zero.

I am moving as many tasks as possible out of the PC, no calendar, no clock on the taskbar etc. Anything that can be done without PC should be done without it. I want to use the PC like I used fix-wired appliances: For a defined task. Something goes in, get processed, get outs. Finished.

Ideally, for me, one computer should do only one task, and no more. In this case, more (computers) would be less (time wasting).

Because a file remains editable, it exacerbates my ADD problem of never getting stuff finished. Even if I finish it, the editability of a file never gives me the feeling a project is really finished. I hope my approach with help with this too and bring structure into my doing.

Probably a computer doesn't inevitably have to bog one down, but in my personal situation and in combination with my personality, it does. I have tried a lot of less radical approaches, but it always ended up with spending even more time on the PC. If this last try doesn't help, I'll finally throw the thing out of the window!

EveningMan
06-12-09, 06:07 PM
The core of the problem is: I want to do something interesting, but with as little effort as possible. I think this is what makes the net so attractive for so many. Not having much money or time adds to it.

Since early childhood I was always good with occupying myself with something. Thanks god back then opportunities to do something interesting within my own room were limited, so I was forced to get out.

Now with internet, books, tv, magazines, household chores, kids ... it never really get's boring. And that's bad, for me. I realized some time ago that boredom is the fuel that drives my engine - to take action. I lack boredom, as strange as it might sound.

And I am trying to recreate it. Throwing "interesting", but meaningless things away. Reducing gadgets. Whatever. And resisting the temptation to fill the emptiness with other "interesting" stuff.

alphalpha
06-12-09, 07:32 PM
I dont know whether I am gifted or not...but I think I am decent...

I dont see the benefit of getting diagnosed gifted either...as such I dont see the benefit of knowing your IQ either..

I think the modern craze for getting labelled "gifted" is just because people want to get things without the effort or the perseverance needed...just like getting a pill to get high..or drinking alcohol to get over or mindlessly watching movies like me :)

To me it seems happiness is always relative...you compare yourself with people of your own caliber and see where you are relative to them...if you are not where you think you should be you get unhappy...

getting labelled gifted and having adhd..will only make you unhappy..for you will be expected and expect to perform as well as other gifted people...and think that giftedness itself will get you there...

talent is overrated...

now only if I could follow my own advice :)

Retromancer
06-13-09, 01:44 AM
There is one certain way to take care of that nagging feeling of having not utilized that often cited "potential":


http://i175.photobucket.com/albums/w150/highcstl/lobotomy202.jpg

Annwn
06-15-09, 11:24 AM
I am frustrated.

Aren't IQ tests for people to test knowledge but really it is about factual information? I am not sure how or what it tests like...say a comparable adult female like myself.

I know I am different, and not just in terms of my current (ongoing) assessment/diagnosis of Adhd. Not necessarily gifted, but definitely qualities of. I know I have abilities that are beyond normal that I cannot describe verbally--but not necessarily that of trivia, factual information...my problem is that if it is something is then of not enough interest to me, or nothing to "know"...my mind will not bother with it.

I know, confusing. It is like...I don't want to bother being tested because ultimately I know it is testing, and I have real issues and biases with it.

I am excited,and hoping that my first trial of meds (upcoming) help with sustaining my attention: then I can learn learn learn learn learn. I would focus wow....I can't wait. I want to teach myself how to play guitar, piano, take classes and courses, and paint and write, and be active and love life. I have this fear of achieving though, accomplishing...like an ingrained helplessness due to having to not feel disappointed with myself for being an underachiever when I know I am very smart, very much in love with learning (EVERYTHING)...hmm...my thoughts for the day!


Okay, I just reread parts of my post and I was totally off a tangent about IQ tests hahaha. Feels so out of place, my post!

There are several aspects to a normal cognitive assessment. The one I took had some math but not really above high school level, some vocabulary words and some verbal reasoning problems where they ask you to describe the relationship between two seemingly unrelated words.

They also did a spatial reasoning test where you had to replicate certain tile patterns from a card using blocks that had different colors on them.

One of the main components to IQ theory is abstract reasoning. People with very high abstract reasoning tend to see connections, patterns and similarities that other people often to not see. These are the problems with a series of depictions of geometric shapes that change in a particular way over several frames. You have to then predict what the next iteration will look like based on what you were able to discern them the known sequence.

There are other cognitive theories such as the theory of "multiple intelligences" where people are viewed not as singularly smart or unsmart, but as differently gifted. Maybe someone is low in abstract reasoning, but they are a superb athlete (kinesthetic intelligence) and they are an amazing musician (musical intelligence) etc. I think this theory recognizes 7 or 8 broad "intelligences" like verbal, math, body movement, music and maybe emotional? I can't remember.

However, scoring low on abstract reasoning will keep anyone from getting much above average on an IQ test and those tests do not account well for other gifts.

The good news is that there have been several studies about the correlation between IQ and success and some people believe they can show that once you have an IQ of 120 (upper end of average/normal - roughly) anything beyond that does not correlate to a more successful life outcome.

I dont know whether I am gifted or not...but I think I am decent...

I dont see the benefit of getting diagnosed gifted either...as such I dont see the benefit of knowing your IQ either..

I think the modern craze for getting labelled "gifted" is just because people want to get things without the effort or the perseverance needed...just like getting a pill to get high..or drinking alcohol to get over or mindlessly watching movies like me :)

To me it seems happiness is always relative...you compare yourself with people of your own caliber and see where you are relative to them...if you are not where you think you should be you get unhappy...

getting labelled gifted and having adhd..will only make you unhappy..for you will be expected and expect to perform as well as other gifted people...and think that giftedness itself will get you there...

talent is overrated...

now only if I could follow my own advice :)

I agree with you that labeling kids "gifted" and then expecting higher performance can create undue stress and pressure.

However, anyone who has ever dealt with gifted kids will tell you that they do not universally perform at a higher level. There will be the few who do amazing things, the few who crash and burn repeatedly (like me) and the other ones that have a fairly average life outcome.

If a kid is substantially under performing, yet seems to be bright, an IQ test can confirm that they are, in fact, highly intelligent. Imagine if they did NOT test these kids? They might take a brilliant child with super high language ability but because they have ADHD, they struggle with school.

If you did not test them, you might just be inclined to place them in a remedial program with the idea that "poor performance = poor ability". Never even considering that some kids have both poor performance and high ability. So many people simply cannot wrap their head around that idea.

I think it is because most school teachers tend to be "neurotypical", with strong preferences for getting things done and of very median/average intellect. Because these people often have well developed executive functions, but only average intellect, they may not even recognize their vibrant desire to get things done early or on time and they may see people who do not share their prefferences as being very "broken". Then they see that the kid is bright and they think - this kid has the extra smarts I wish I had but he is a lazy bum! At this point, that teachers former student engages in a vivid fantasy of that teachers head exploding as the result of a violent paradigm shift.

suewave
06-15-09, 08:03 PM
However, anyone who has ever dealt with gifted kids will tell you that they do not universally perform at a higher level. There will be the few who do amazing things, the few who crash and burn repeatedly (like me) and the other ones that have a fairly average life outcome.

I teach in a G&T high school. This is absolutely true. I was also someone classified as intellectually gifted, but who did not "perform at a higher level". Of course, if I was diagnosed with ADD back then instead of being told it was "learned laziness", well, things may have been a bit easier.


I think it is because most school teachers tend to be "neurotypical", with strong preferences for getting things done and of very median/average intellect. Because these people often have well developed executive functions, but only average intellect, they may not even recognize their vibrant desire to get things done early or on time and they may see people who do not share their prefferences as being very "broken".
But isn't that true by society's standards? Isn't that why we have problems as ADDers?

Then they see that the kid is bright and they think - this kid has the extra smarts I wish I had but he is a lazy bum! I can guarantee you that "these people" of which you speak do NOT think that. Teachers who recognize the intelligence will struggle how to figure out how to engage those students (not thinking they are lazy bums). The other teachers will swear they are smarter than the kids (NEVER envying their level of intelligence or talent). Believe me.
At this point, that teachers former student engages in a vivid fantasy of that teachers head exploding as the result of a violent paradigm shift.

You have no idea how offensive I find this as a teacher. With ADD. Who is exhausted by trying to make things relevant/interesting/engaging so that her students can succeed in a school system which requires students to get things done on time regardless of personal preferences or interest.

silverstreams
06-15-09, 08:33 PM
Not really sure what this thread is about by now, but the term 'gifted' annoys me. Being 'gifted' is just another label that comes with all sorts of expectations.

I choose to believe that anyone, no matter if their IQ is average, above average or gifted, can succeed if they try hard enough and have a bit of luck.

Annwn
06-16-09, 02:29 AM
I teach in a G&T high school. This is absolutely true. I was also someone classified as intellectually gifted, but who did not "perform at a higher level". Of course, if I was diagnosed with ADD back then instead of being told it was "learned laziness", well, things may have been a bit easier.


But isn't that true by society's standards? Isn't that why we have problems as ADDers?
I can guarantee you that "these people" of which you speak do NOT think that. Teachers who recognize the intelligence will struggle how to figure out how to engage those students (not thinking they are lazy bums). The other teachers will swear they are smarter than the kids (NEVER envying their level of intelligence or talent). Believe me.


You have no idea how offensive I find this as a teacher. With ADD. Who is exhausted by trying to make things relevant/interesting/engaging so that her students can succeed in a school system which requires students to get things done on time regardless of personal preferences or interest.

With the greatest respect, the people you refer to are those people and I am sure they are lovely. The people I was referring to are these people. Clearly those and these are different people and you have not met the people I was referring to.

Please also note that any discomfort that may have been experienced by these people was purely metaphorical and absolutely none of these people were harmed in the events leading up to this post.

I hope you will forgive me if I went too far. Have you ever been physically struck by a teacher as the result of your ADHD symptoms? On an on going basis?

I guess you could say that the marks I earned in that class - became a part of my permanent record.

suewave
06-18-09, 09:40 PM
ANNwn,

I've been struck in grade school, but not enough for scarring. I'm very sorry that happened to you. It's not right.

Maurice
06-18-09, 09:53 PM
I can not put into words how tired I am of hearing about having high intelligence, genius level, this one really kills me "GIFTED!!!" Some ****in* gift!! It is a gift that you can not unwrap , take out of the box let alone USE it!! Please

Grafter
06-18-09, 10:06 PM
I feel you, man. Nobody has RSVP'd to my Gift-Exchange party. Go figure.

However, for all it's negative aspects, I still wouldn't exchange it. Negative aspects are always countered by positive one's, even if we don't always see it.

Azoox
06-20-09, 04:27 PM
To me it seems happiness is always relative...you compare yourself with people of your own caliber and see where you are relative to them...if you are not where you think you should be you get unhappy...
getting labelled gifted and having adhd..will only make you unhappy..for you will be expected and expect to perform as well as other gifted people...and think that giftedness itself will get you there...
talent is overrated...
now only if I could follow my own advice :)

I couldn't agree more. Our ego exists and thrives on comparison and competition. If you add to it the basic rule of competition in capitalism, you almost get a perfect recipe for dissatisfaction and unhappiness. However, putting all the blame on the world outside would be equally detrimental to the potential that's inside of each one of us. If you ask me, I like to treat a thought about me in comparison to someone else as just a thought. I let it float wherever it wants to without pulling it or attracting it in any way. This way I can still be myself and do whatever it is I am doing in peace while the constellation of my thoughts becomes a canopy of numerous bright thought stars all around me. If they have already started shining there, they might as well produce some light for me to see my purpose better, right? :)

Azoox
06-20-09, 05:02 PM
Not really sure what this thread is about by now, but the term 'gifted' annoys me. Being 'gifted' is just another label that comes with all sorts of expectations.

I choose to believe that anyone, no matter if their IQ is average, above average or gifted, can succeed if they try hard enough and have a bit of luck.

Yes, yes, and yes. I agree entirely. Ironically, many people here are trying to express their dissatisfaction with the fact that the world labels us (or others), so to hell with labels, but under the same breath they label the world or themselves or us (or others), so we're truly going round in circles intensifying the labeling process instead of dismantling it. The only way I see it happening at the beginning is--and I'm sorry if I am repeating myself here--on the individual level: stop labeling! Stop labeling yourself, stop labeling your neighbor, stop labeling your partner, stop labeling your parents, stop labeling your dog or any pet you may have... stop labeling! It's as simple--and as hard--as that. In my previous reply, I focused on the ego thriving on competition, but labeling is also what makes the ego emerge and dance its happy painful dance. In my case, I do know I have the condition called inattentive ADD, apart from a few other conditions, but as long as I don't accept this fact--not condone it or get resigned to it, but just accept it for what it is--I will never be able to stop labeling myself and others. And if I don't, then I'll keep resisting, suffering, complaining, throwing tantrums, and doing a zillion other foolish things I could very easily prevent from happening if... I stopped labeling! Although I've mentioned this book in another entry posted in another thread, let me repeat and recommend--it will definitely help some people get the point I'm trying to make here from this very well written book--Sari Solden's Journeys Through ADDulthood. It's a particularly good source, worth those $10 or even $20, unless you want to try your local library and read it for free first. It helps you understand how to live WITH your condition rather than DESPITE it. Trust me, it's a tremendous relief once you've changed your perspective, and most definitely it's the first great step--maybe even the only one for you to make--to... STOP LABELING ;)

Imnapl
07-14-09, 01:04 PM
Have you ever been physically struck by a teacher as the result of your ADHD symptoms?Yes, but that was decades ago and it was an accepted standard of behaviour for parents and public school teachers. I spent four long years in public school before I had a teacher who understood me and I will never forget what she did for me by breaking the cycle of misunderstanding and abuse, not just of me, but my classmates as well. Being an empathetic, reactive, child with ADHD caused me to internalize other's pain which only added to my nightmare.

Time and experience, especially in many different public school classrooms, first as a parent and then professionally, has taught me that my early years in school are a dead dinosaur. I now understand that many women became teachers because there were few choices in those days. What are you going to be: a wife, a teacher or a nurse? People often didn't become teachers because they felt a calling, they became teachers because one could get a job with a limited amount of education. That isn't the case in many places today.

tnhybrid
07-14-09, 08:48 PM
Same boat. "Gifted" all the way through school, also a visual artist. BUT have struggled to produce artwork, since I have to stay home alone (in a room with a computer) to do it. I'm finally out taking classes, any one of which I could teach, but they get me out of the house and away from all the distractions. It's working a little bit.

Wish I could try meds...but everything has made me really sick. More like allergies than anything. ::sigh::

Simenora
05-18-10, 02:09 PM
48 yrs old, finally in University completing, YES I SAID COMPLETING,my undergrad. I was diagnosed last year and doc said cogs were off the charts and don't worry about getting that doctorate because your intellect is already there. I am not as gifted as my son though. with diagnosis, my GPA climbed from 3.1 to 3.8. I have a bad habit of not finishing (or starting) assignments. I still struggle with procrastination, making appointments etc. I don't like Concerta, I am going to ask for Adderal like my hubby.Like everyone here, I havefelt like a looser more often than comfortable. I think the issue with being intelligent is that you understand whats happening. I always resented the hell out of the honour roll students. I didn't think they were as smart as me.

pumibel
05-19-10, 11:45 PM
My grades were excellent in high school, but I started doing well in school around 5th grade. Prior to that is was a hard row to hoe. I almost failed fourth grade, but my life was very unstable then.

My academic achievement was not easy. I worked very hard for it. I studied every night, sometimes quite late. I did socialize, but mostly on weekends. I think at some point I realized that to do well in school I had to take very precise notes. I would go home and re-write my notes along with the assigned homework. By focusing on note-taking in class I was forced to pay attention to the teacher. If I had a choice in seating I would pick the first row, but most of the time I would end up close to the front based on alphabetical order. As part of the gifted program I was almost always in classes with the same students so if the teacher did an alphabetical arrangement I would end up in the second row with a clear shot of the teacher. This got rid of some distractions.

When I went to college I would pick a front row seat- easy because most people tend to lag to the back of the room. I used a tape recorder in lecture classes. In my most recent college years I have taken online classes. The computer classes have tutorials with pictures, which make learning the programs very easy. Other classes usually are based completely on reading in the text. I have no problems in those classes.

I have recently been diagnosed ADHD-I, so all of these compensations I had learned on my own. I have read that these things are common advice for students with ADHD now. I guess my guardian angel was looking out for me because there were no counselors helping me in school. My mom was very busy working, and she had not taken the kind of classes I was taking, so she couldn't help me. In fact, I helped her with her college Algebra when I was in High School, LOL

I also learned that in order to make sure I turned everything in on time I had to go back and read the syllabus almost every day. This is where a little OCD does work out for the best

yanshcher
05-20-10, 02:51 PM
In my school I was under 'gifted' section but still on date I didn't find anything which I can proudly call gifted. :(

Alicatt
05-20-10, 05:33 PM
I, for one, feel there is a correlation between having AD/HD and being of above average intelligence. It would certainly be something very interesting to study.

I always scored very high on standardized tests while still in public school. In fact on my final year, (7th grade), I scored over 90% on all topics except for Math. I scored over 95% on half of those topics, and 98%/99% on two of them. Math was scored at an 85%.

National percentile scoring works like this for those who don't know: The percent you are given means you scored higher than that percent of students tested at the same level as you.

I am among those who have not been diagnosed until adulthood. I'm 25 and I have gone my entire life knowing I am intelligent, but not understanding why I couldn't do what I wanted to do no matter how hard I tried.

Xanthus
05-25-10, 01:26 PM
I was salutatorian of my high school (class of 400ish), had really high test scores, etc., and was generally regarded as one of the best students my school had seen. What nobody realized was that I had absolutely no social life my last two years of high school. The number of times I got together with kids my age outside of school or school associated activities--zero. ALL I did was study, or try to study at least. My senior year this is what every day looked like. I'd get home from school, completely mentally exhausted (I was taking seven AP classes), and sleep until 6 or 7 PM. Then I'd put off my homework as much as possible, though not particularly doing anything while putting it off. Not watching TV, not playing video games, just waiting for the realization to come over me that the next day I had an essay due, 40 pages to read for a class, and two tests, and I hadn't even started to work or study. Then I'd reach borderline panic and start to focus. I skipped all the assignments that weren't mandatory, all reading, never wrote drafts or outlines of papers, and almost never studied for the tests. Around 10 PM I'd really get into gear, start writing my papers, doing assignments, applying to colleges (I applied to ten, and waited until the last minute for all of them). I'd generally finish around 3 AM, wake up the next day at 6 AM, and repeat. I'd study for tests and do simple assignments in classes or between classes. I NEVER took notes, ever, because I was always trying to finish assignments or cram for a test and because taking notes for me is extremely difficult.

So this is how I did extremely well in high school--by having no life whatsoever to compensate for my complete lack of organization and concentration. I managed the first couple years of college this way too, until I started to struggle. I've dropped so many classes it's ridiculous. I've changed majors at least four times, withdrawn from university twice. This whole time it never occurred to me that I could have ADHD, because first, I was not impulsive/disruptive (I'd never heard of inattentive ADD), and second, I had always been an excellent student (on paper). That seemed to exclude the diagnosis, so I thought I just needed to work harder.

I really wish I'd found out about ADHD sooner.

You just summed up my whole life perfectly. I'm on the verge of dropping varsity for the third time... I started meds a few days ago. I'm really praying that they work. Because I took 50% more subjects than required at school and came in the top 20 in my district, for five years (I'm 23 now) the thought that I could be ADHD was preposterous to me... Docs said depression and bipolar and twenty other things but this is the only one that's starting to make sense...

fracturedstory
05-27-10, 02:00 AM
I was interested in very little of my school work. Was brilliant at Art and language. Didn't care for P.E. Math was difficult and boring. English and geography was interesting but I still didn't do as well. I was perfecting my drawing skills in class 95% of the time.
I was definitely the day dreamy/inattentive type.

I wish I was diagnosed and put on meds earlier, but I'm into more academic things now. It didn't take me long to catch up to my peers.

So gifted? Eh doubt it. But not as below average as I once thought I was. I'm still trying to work out where I went so wrong. At times I blame myself for not trying harder. I guess it was just because I wasn't diagnosed.

Nova
05-30-10, 02:21 AM
I've posted, countless articles, previously, on here, regarding ADD/HD and Giftedness.

I've, never wavered, in my view, that ADD/HDer's, are Gifted, due to my own experience.

Just because you lack, in one area, doesn't mean, you lack, in all.

Whatever, it is, that you, truly enjoy, doing, or are passionate about, is what, you, are Gifted, in.

Even, if that, continually changes.

Nova

meridian
05-30-10, 12:06 PM
I am among those who have not been diagnosed until adulthood. I'm 25 and I have gone my entire life knowing I am intelligent, but not understanding why I couldn't do what I wanted to do no matter how hard I tried.

This is what led me to decades of depression which was barely controlled by SSRIs for 16 years until a psychiatrist said "AD/HD" 7 months ago just after my 59th birthday.

I, for one, feel there is a correlation between having AD/HD and being of above average intelligence. It would certainly be something very interesting to study.


Actually there isn't a causative correlation between the two. In fact most AD/HD adults with IQ≥120 go undiagnosed for a long time. Statistically, we are "outliers."

However you might find this of interest.

Check out this PDF of a Yale Study from 2009 (http://www.aadd.org.uk/libraryresources/highiqadults.pdf).

pumibel
05-30-10, 12:59 PM
During my last visit my p-doc stated that people who have ADHD and high IQs, especially women, are really the hardest ones to diagnose early. We compensate for many years with our higher intelligence and adapt, therefor throwing off the doctors and creating misdiagnosis for things like bipolar or BPD. This sounds very much like what I read about adult women with Asperger's.

After all those years of presenting a facade of having everything together, there is appoint where we crumble. Mine was a few years ago. I was on inappropriate medication and just manic as hell, along with having physical ailments to boot. Untreated ADHD ("severe" according to my p-doc) in a manic state spells disaster for sure. I am so grateful my mother took me and my daughter in to get better. My sister wanted to take in my daughter and leave me to the wolves (she has her own issues LOL).

adwithouthd
05-31-10, 06:33 AM
I'd say 'gifted' is a strong word-- I associate it with people who can specialize very much, as in, are born for that area of study, and end up in that area of study or practice.

However, through high school, I think I did pretty well (and rather, annoyingly, for others, quite easily). I still have one person's comment on my shirt, in which he claims, he "wishes" he could transplant my brain. In hindsight I do think it would be a good idea, even though what he wrote might have said more about his brain than mine.

In College I was just lazy. There were times that I tried and did well, and times I missed half the semester or so. I think had I tried harder (and partially it was laziness than ADD), I would have done better. Now it is irrelevant anyway though. However, even though I just scored a B in Calc 2, my Math professor had sent me a letter of invitation through the math department to pursue the field further. He saw me hyperfocusing in class during test, and got excited I guess. I took the major, it wasn't as great afterwards though, because I was, frankly, lazy (not the ADD lazy part, plain lazy, though compunded by ADD) and I think I realized I didn't have a 'gift' for math.

I think for me, when I do group study at a more advanced level now (Master's), I realize that I have no storage, that is....ok this is what happened with me. I was studying with a programmer and you know how good with languages they are-- mastering remembering, inputs/outputs is how it works. So, I spent 10 hours in trying to understand something and then we were sitting together, and I was explaining to him that part. He didn't understand it at all, in fact he never tried to-- that was the great irony-- he didn't need to understand it to be able to do it. He quickly wrote down how to use the equations and was done, and could do the stuff more effeciently then me, within 2 hours. He didn't need to 'understand' the logic behind it, he just needed to "know" how to do it to be able to do it. Next, is the heartbreaking part. The next chapter built upon this one, and he did the same in 3-4 hours, while, I, because we weren't doing things by understanding and it was getting more and more complex, didn't get anything (it was incredibly frustrating as he ended up knowing a lot more stuff than me in a lot less time). Wow. I realized that the only way I was able to do things was by understanding, it was a great limitation. And, even then, I had to understand it again and again, so as to retain it. It becomes a struggle with complex stuff, to have to understand each time from the core.

However, my advantage over that person is, I suppose, that precisely because I understand it, once I get the skill through sheer hard work and sweat, I can apply it in many contexts. Hence, he could get more specialized than me in terms of "knowing how to do stuff" but I obtain a more ecclectic and varied view because of the way I have to do things. In the workplace he has a definite advantage, however when it comes to matters of decision-making and judgment, I'll have an advantage. Getting there will be the most difficult part though.

And, I suppose, with many ADDERs this could be there strength, in that, they can have a much more versatile perspective, they can extract ideas and apply it to various different places. Because they understand and do things (or in fact have to understand and do things because there is no storage of 'actual things'), they can be much more intuitive. You could say it is innovation in a sense.

hula_hoop
05-31-10, 11:10 PM
great article. i was also in the gifted program in grade school and high school. and graduated with honors in undergrad. sometimes i just blame that on dumb luck because i did not work as hard and could not focus as much as other students around me. after struggling in grad school, i was diagnosed with adhd and i am doing a lot better on vyvanse. i can finish assignments, get to class on time and i procrastinate a lot less. not to mention, i dont try to drown the frustration in alcohol or by over eating.

i can say that i am in grad school for design, and MANY creative people suffer from adhd. they are just too distracted by everything around them and want to be doing too much. it is both a blessing and a curse.

hula_hoop
05-31-10, 11:20 PM
I was salutatorian of my high school (class of 400ish), had really high test scores, etc., and was generally regarded as one of the best students my school had seen. What nobody realized was that I had absolutely no social life my last two years of high school. The number of times I got together with kids my age outside of school or school associated activities--zero. ALL I did was study, or try to study at least. My senior year this is what every day looked like. I'd get home from school, completely mentally exhausted (I was taking seven AP classes), and sleep until 6 or 7 PM. Then I'd put off my homework as much as possible, though not particularly doing anything while putting it off. Not watching TV, not playing video games, just waiting for the realization to come over me that the next day I had an essay due, 40 pages to read for a class, and two tests, and I hadn't even started to work or study. Then I'd reach borderline panic and start to focus. I skipped all the assignments that weren't mandatory, all reading, never wrote drafts or outlines of papers, and almost never studied for the tests. Around 10 PM I'd really get into gear, start writing my papers, doing assignments, applying to colleges (I applied to ten, and waited until the last minute for all of them). I'd generally finish around 3 AM, wake up the next day at 6 AM, and repeat. I'd study for tests and do simple assignments in classes or between classes. I NEVER took notes, ever, because I was always trying to finish assignments or cram for a test and because taking notes for me is extremely difficult.

So this is how I did extremely well in high school--by having no life whatsoever to compensate for my complete lack of organization and concentration. I managed the first couple years of college this way too, until I started to struggle. I've dropped so many classes it's ridiculous. I've changed majors at least four times, withdrawn from university twice. This whole time it never occurred to me that I could have ADHD, because first, I was not impulsive/disruptive (I'd never heard of inattentive ADD), and second, I had always been an excellent student (on paper). That seemed to exclude the diagnosis, so I thought I just needed to work harder.

I really wish I'd found out about ADHD sooner.

this was totally me. i am glad i wasn't alone

hula_hoop
05-31-10, 11:24 PM
My nicknames throughout school and all the way to my last jobs were always "wierdo", "loser" and stuff like that, but when I got into interesting conversations with somebody I always get comments like "you're smart, you just don't like to show it", or "I didn't think you were a person who actually reads" WTF...

me too! people always tell me stuff like that. i hate how they are surprised at my intelligence. it makes me worried that i come off as a moron.

hula_hoop
05-31-10, 11:46 PM
I, for one, feel there is a correlation between having AD/HD and being of above average intelligence. It would certainly be something very interesting to study.

I always scored very high on standardized tests while still in public school. In fact on my final year, (7th grade), I scored over 90% on all topics except for Math. I scored over 95% on half of those topics, and 98%/99% on two of them. Math was scored at an 85%.

National percentile scoring works like this for those who don't know: The percent you are given means you scored higher than that percent of students tested at the same level as you.

I am among those who have not been diagnosed until adulthood. I'm 25 and I have gone my entire life knowing I am intelligent, but not understanding why I couldn't do what I wanted to do no matter how hard I tried.

This is exactly my story. I did so well on all of those tests, no one ever suspected a problem. But after entering Grad school, I got diagnosed at 26 and cannot help but muse about the "what ifs". What if I had been diagnosed in the 9th grade? Could I have gone to an Ivy League? It is all very frustrating.

Young Silk
06-09-10, 08:24 PM
Funny how this works, we're very bright and yet we struggle with being glued to menial, repetitive jobs, which are the MOST FRUSTRATING THING to us. The irony...:rolleyes:

This is me. I was labeled gifted as a child and was in all of the advanced classes. I remember random bits of information at the drop of a dime and quote them having people like "How did you know that?" I too did well in college and crashed in Grad school when I really tried to "Buckle down and study..." I couldn't remember the simplest of things when I needed too... I graduated just barely but now its the challenge of working where mistakes can cost you and brilliance in only good if it furthers their bottom line.

The Gift and Cursed indeed.

The_Robin_Hood
06-10-10, 09:08 AM
I was thinking about this the other day and low and behold there is a topic on here about it.

I can thoroughly relate.. I feel like I've spent my entire life being labeled lazy, stoner, apathetic etc. It is really horrible when people notice the fact that you have a brain and are shocked by it. You can see it in there eyes, there is a profound look of shock and awe. I get it quite often it feels like I'm not supposed to be smart at all. I grew up feeling like I was stupid, was often in the middle to lower sets in school, I had to re-take maths GCSE because I failed the first time around and scored 97% the second time. That doesn't just happen.

I hardly ever did my homework or if I did it was always at the last minute, I remember doing a really good painting on the bus on the way to college one morning and was pretty happy with myself for pulling a rabbit out of the hat. I often surprised myself by what I could achieve when I actually did something. If it wasn't for the fact that I'm artistic and reasonably talented I don't know where I would be today.

I dropped out of uni very early on because of boredom, struggling with working and trying to complete assignments on time.

I'm not sure that I'm gifted because I've often felt quite dumb, it's a weird paradox. Yet the older I get the more I'm shocked at how stupid people seem around me, it's really quite weird. I'm either more intelligent than I think or most people are really quite stupid, I don't know which.

Please note that I don't like feeling like this and don't want to put anyone down I'm just a bit confused.

adwithouthd
06-10-10, 12:18 PM
"I can thoroughly relate.. I feel like I've spent my entire life being labeled lazy, stoner, apathetic etc. It is really horrible when people notice the fact that you have a brain and are shocked by it. You can see it in there eyes, there is a profound look of shock and awe. I get it quite often it feels like I'm not supposed to be smart at all. I grew up feeling like I was stupid, was often in the middle to lower sets in school, I had to re-take maths GCSE because I failed the first time around and scored 97% the second time. That doesn't just happen.I can thoroughly relate.. I feel like I've spent my entire life being labeled lazy, stoner, apathetic etc. It is really horrible when people notice the fact that you have a brain and are shocked by it. You can see it in there eyes, there is a profound look of shock and awe. I get it quite often it feels like I'm not supposed to be smart at all. I grew up feeling like I was stupid, was often in the middle to lower sets in school, I had to re-take maths GCSE because I failed the first time around and scored 97% the second time. That doesn't just happen."

I know what you mean. I had taken it only once (including Additional Math) and scored the exact same percentile in both as yours. I think 98 percentile was a distinction.

"I'm not sure that I'm gifted because I've often felt quite dumb, it's a weird paradox. Yet the older I get the more I'm shocked at how stupid people seem around me, it's really quite weird. I'm either more intelligent than I think or most people are really quite stupid, I don't know which. "

I know what you mean there, as well :/

The thing is, you may be smart, and then you are aloof because of ADHD (aloof in the sense, it is hard to connect with people at a personal level). So, smart people can have narcissistic tendencies and, then, being aloof means that you look at all sort of group behavior analytically and critically.

My two cents: You might want to go in some sort of group behaviorial therapy :/

Retromancer
06-10-10, 02:14 PM
Attending a state college. The horror, the horror...

This is exactly my story. I did so well on all of those tests, no one ever suspected a problem. But after entering Grad school, I got diagnosed at 26 and cannot help but muse about the "what ifs". What if I had been diagnosed in the 9th grade? Could I have gone to an Ivy League? It is all very frustrating.

oblivio
06-10-10, 04:55 PM
I think there are definitely a lot of highly intelligent people who underachieve due to ADHD issues, and a lot of highly accomplished ADHD people (children and adults alike) who are not seeking treatment, or who are seeking treatment and being told that they couldn't possibly have ADHD issues because of their accomplishments.

When you ask how people cope, I'm not sure whether you meant cope with ADHD in order to do well academically/professionally, or whether you meant cope with the feeling that ADHD is holding you back academically/professionally.

In answer to your first question, I think choosing a pursuit that you are passionate about and that are better suited for the ADHD personality is a pretty key move. Entrepenurial jobs (so long as somebody else handles the money part), outdoor-oriented jobs, teaching, academic research pursuits all seem to tap into some of the high-energy, microfocus aspects.

One thing that worked well for me in college was changing things up. I enrolled in a cooperative program with a company where I worked for a semester at the company and went to school for a semester. I was never in one place long enough for the boredom and self-sabotage to set in.

If it is not too late, I would try to avoid entering any long-term relationships if you do want to have a chance at succeeding in high school/college. Where the wheels really came off the wagon for me was when I couldn't rely on the all nighter or obsessively working at something to produce a passable work product. I'm really terrible at balancing my personal and professional lives, and both have suffered at one time or another as a result.

In answer to your second question, how ADHD holds you back is just always going to be there. I won't speak for others, but from what I've seen on various posts I've read is that we are a really stubborn and resilient bunch who just don't know when to quit. I keep going by telling myself that I am doing the best that I can, but that ultimately there are limits to what I can achieve. Not very uplifting, but those are the cards I was dealt, and I'll play them as best as I can.

I think of myself as kind of a homerun hitter - I can rally for the occasional awesome feat of intellect, but on average, I'm lucky if I'm equivalently productive to my coworkers. Fortunately, my home runs are still valued by the people I work with, despite the occasional drama induced by my habitual procrastination. I just feel really lucky and blessed that I was able to make it to this point, and that a few key people along the way gave me the benefit of the doubt and let me do my thing.

BTW, I just research and write for a living. I'm not exactly a world-beater but I like what I do for a living and the people I work with. When I was younger, I wanted more but as I wind down my first half-century, I can live with this.

The_Robin_Hood
06-11-10, 08:13 AM
"The thing is, you may be smart, and then you are aloof because of ADHD (aloof in the sense, it is hard to connect with people at a personal level). So, smart people can have narcissistic tendencies and, then, being aloof means that you look at all sort of group behavior analytically and critically.

My two cents: You might want to go in some sort of group behaviorial therapy :/

Ok.. Well I don't think I'm a narcissist at all really but am definately warmly aloof if there is such a thing ;)

adwithouthd
06-11-10, 10:35 PM
Ok.. Well I don't think I'm a narcissist at all really but am definately warmly aloof if there is such a thing ;)

I meant 'nacissistic tendencies'.

With your criticism of others initially, it hardly sounds like you are 'warmly aloof'.

When you see everyone clapping together (at times for no particular reason), do you go like, "how idiotic is that?"

If so, you do need some group-oriented therapy :/

Jim24
06-12-10, 12:26 AM
Wow am I glad I found this forum! I recently started seeing a psychologist (Wednesday) for some non-ADD related stuff and while she was taking my history she asked if I'd ever been diagnosed with ADD...ummm....noooo....Do I look hyperactive to you? was my basic response. She gave me a screening and lo and behold, here I am...

Reading through this thread hits so many nerves for me. Every test I ever took in school was in the 98-99th percentile. 1300+ on my GRE, yet for some dang reason I've never been able to figure out why I can't get homework done on time(if at all), or I sit in front of the computer for 3 hours putting off writing an essay that's due the next day. Every teacher I've ever had wanted to know why I was such an under-achiever (the nasty ones just thought I was lazy). My last boss looked at me when I quit because of my declining performance (it was either quit or get fired) and wanted to know why my work performance had declined so quickly. I told her I was burnt out, but I think I was really just so, so, so bored. Just like so many other stories here.

I read my wife and my mom the first two paragraphs from that Yale study a few pages back and they both went "That's you!"

This discovery has literally turned my world and self concept upside down...I'm beginning to feel like I don't have to keep carrying this low self esteem for what I've always thought were my failures.

Anyway...that's enough rambling for now...thanks to all of you for being here.

Jim

adwithouthd
06-12-10, 02:07 AM
Wow am I glad I found this forum! I recently started seeing a psychologist (Wednesday) for some non-ADD related stuff and while she was taking my history she asked if I'd ever been diagnosed with ADD...ummm....noooo....Do I look hyperactive to you? was my basic response. She gave me a screening and lo and behold, here I am...

Reading through this thread hits so many nerves for me. Every test I ever took in school was in the 98-99th percentile. 1300+ on my GRE, yet for some dang reason I've never been able to figure out why I can't get homework done on time(if at all), or I sit in front of the computer for 3 hours putting off writing an essay that's due the next day. Every teacher I've ever had wanted to know why I was such an under-achiever (the nasty ones just thought I was lazy). My last boss looked at me when I quit because of my declining performance (it was either quit or get fired) and wanted to know why my work performance had declined so quickly. I told her I was burnt out, but I think I was really just so, so, so bored. Just like so many other stories here.

I read my wife and my mom the first two paragraphs from that Yale study a few pages back and they both went "That's you!"

This discovery has literally turned my world and self concept upside down...I'm beginning to feel like I don't have to keep carrying this low self esteem for what I've always thought were my failures.

Anyway...that's enough rambling for now...thanks to all of you for being here.

Jim


Here's the thing: You need something to stimulate you, induce hyperfocus, hypomania-- you need something that is going to consistently test you and make you use your judgment. Discoveries are rare events, even with ADHD you are fighting the odds. Try to find something that is going to be fulfilling in the above sense.

So, in some sense, if there is too much structure in a firm, you will find it difficult to cope with. However, if the firm is relatively small and about to grow (less rigid) and it might require good intuition and judgment, then it might be the case that you will find it more stimulating.

I am not taking medications because I realized hyperfocus is my strength, and if hypomania comes about with hyperfocus at the 'right time', then passion and reason can be aligned in a constructive way. Besides that, I might instead becomee even worse without hyperfocus.

twisty
06-12-10, 02:34 AM
I was very good grade wise throughout elementary, and junior high. Honor roll throughout the entire run. All A's many of the years. My mom still uses that as an argument against the ADHD thing ("BUT he did good in school!.") Then when the symptoms started to get worse and I couldn't concentrate and was getting distracted easily, I plummeted. I stopped trying, stopped studying, stopped turning in work. I was skipping assignments, pushing out papers with words that I couldn't even remember after typing them. I'd sit through Algebra 2 and just play Brick Breaker on my phone in the back of the class every day. My grades weren't a complete failure but there sure were down low. Also, I think I was absent about 30 or 35 days or more during my 10th grade more. I averaged about 25 days absent during the years prior. I was just too lazy to go and my mom really didn't force me too much sometimes.

I left public school during the second week of 11th grade. I went into home schooling and starting attending an online high school. They send you the books and all the assignments are online. You can go at your own place and you get a real diploma. It was hell getting through it all and finishing. I suffered the worst with my ADHD doing home school. I could write pages and pages of my suffering with completing no-discipline, self-paced homework. After months and months and months of getting pressured by family and having my brain racked to finish, I finished. I actually did very good in the home school classes, mostly because it was easier and I could pop out paper that sounded great (a good skill to have).

I know I have/had the intelligence to complete high school and even complete a full degree in college if it weren't for the ADHD. I'm eighteen now. I would not be able to handle traditional two/four year college. The concentrating and focus problems were so horrid during home school high school, how can I manage college?

I finally decided to take go to a college that is one-year long and is a hands-on college that specializes in entertainment, broadcasting and production. Not much classwork, it's going out and working with all the equipment and learning it hands-on. I think that is the best way to channel my intelligence and actually be able to use it without having my ADHD take over and fail me.

The_Robin_Hood
06-12-10, 10:50 AM
I meant 'nacissistic tendencies'.

With your criticism of others initially, it hardly sounds like you are 'warmly aloof'.

When you see everyone clapping together (at times for no particular reason), do you go like, "how idiotic is that?"

If so, you do need some group-oriented therapy :/


I do not outwardly criticise anyone, these are just thoughts that go through my head. Believe it or not.. I'm a very nice person as rule. I get a lot of enjoyment out of helping others and always have.

I don't mock others as you so rudely implied.. Please do not judge me by your own standards, thanks :)

I am merely curious about my own intelligence in comparison to others, maybe I'm not the best at communicating this.

WordMan
06-12-10, 12:46 PM
I am so happy and excited to find addforums, and especially these threads on "Gifted and ADHD" and "Predominantly Inattentive ADHD." Even though I've known that I had ADD since about 1994, I did not really begin coming to grips with how much it has affected me until these past few months. More specifically, I've begun to realize more clearly how the story of my ADD is the story of inattentive ADD, which is very different from the stories of hyperactive people. In some ways, I feel like hyperactive ADD has become almost romanticized, and a few hyperactive folks can become extremely successful even with their ADHD -- they've got all that crazy energy, and they're extroverted. But inattentive ADD gets ignored. The tremendous pain, loss, confusion and low self-esteem we feel -- "if I'm so smart, why am I such a failure?" -- is totally off the radar. The stories I've been reading on this thread, one after another, are of people who didn't know they were ADD until they were already failing in many ways.

Our stories make me think of the old slogan for the United Negro College Fund: "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." We are all struggling to utilize our brainpower. Many of us have remarkable talents, but our output is mediocre or worse, and it -- absolutely -- is not our fault. It is a brain glitch, and it sucks. I am feeling more and more committed to letting people know this exists and getting the mental health community to understand that this is not just normal variance in the human brain, but a debilitating disability that needs more... well.. attention.

I am going to be writing more in the days and weeks ahead, about my own experiences and about my own theories about what is going on in the brain, but this is enough for now. Suffice to say that I relate to everyone's stories, of being extremely bright in school only to struggle tremendously with college and work for the next 35 years of my life. To you young'uns, I say, fantastic that you're realizing this now about yourself! Learn everything you can about PI, try all the meds until you hit one that helps you at least a little, seek help and coaching, look into CogMed (I haven't done it yet, but I hear it's good), get someone to help you set goals for yourself and follow them through, DON'T feel bad about yourself and NEVER give up on yourself. You are good, and by the time you're my age we'll have lots better treatments and answers!

fraa
06-12-10, 02:08 PM
Well, I am diagnosed as primarily inattentive and am extroverted...

marie-johanne
06-12-10, 03:00 PM
Well, I am diagnosed as primarily inattentive and am extroverted...

That's me. I've been referred to as the human version of a Golden Retriever.

WordMan
06-12-10, 06:06 PM
Golden Retriever? :confused:

adwithouthd
06-12-10, 11:03 PM
I am so happy and excited to find addforums, and especially these threads on "Gifted and ADHD" and "Predominantly Inattentive ADHD." Even though I've known that I had ADD since about 1994, I did not really begin coming to grips with how much it has affected me until these past few months. More specifically, I've begun to realize more clearly how the story of my ADD is the story of inattentive ADD, which is very different from the stories of hyperactive people. In some ways, I feel like hyperactive ADD has become almost romanticized, and a few hyperactive folks can become extremely successful even with their ADHD -- they've got all that crazy energy, and they're extroverted. But inattentive ADD gets ignored. The tremendous pain, loss, confusion and low self-esteem we feel -- "if I'm so smart, why am I such a failure?" -- is totally off the radar. The stories I've been reading on this thread, one after another, are of people who didn't know they were ADD until they were already failing in many ways.

Our stories make me think of the old slogan for the United Negro College Fund: "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." We are all struggling to utilize our brainpower. Many of us have remarkable talents, but our output is mediocre or worse, and it -- absolutely -- is not our fault. It is a brain glitch, and it sucks. I am feeling more and more committed to letting people know this exists and getting the mental health community to understand that this is not just normal variance in the human brain, but a debilitating disability that needs more... well.. attention.

I am going to be writing more in the days and weeks ahead, about my own experiences and about my own theories about what is going on in the brain, but this is enough for now. Suffice to say that I relate to everyone's stories, of being extremely bright in school only to struggle tremendously with college and work for the next 35 years of my life. To you young'uns, I say, fantastic that you're realizing this now about yourself! Learn everything you can about PI, try all the meds until you hit one that helps you at least a little, seek help and coaching, look into CogMed (I haven't done it yet, but I hear it's good), get someone to help you set goals for yourself and follow them through, DON'T feel bad about yourself and NEVER give up on yourself. You are good, and by the time you're my age we'll have lots better treatments and answers!


Hyperactive ADHD and introverted ADD both should be romanticized. And, my point is, if these people have advanced lives in many ways so much, there could be less rigidity in school when it comes to them (because it benefits society as a whole if an Einstein comes up with relativity). This is for the reason that such people can be very creative (in terms of what they can do with ideas), it is just that they can have difficulty absorbing ideas. Once they do, they can question and re-create them in ways that the average person may not choose/ be able to. Besides that, a wider breadth not just in College, but also in high school may prove very beneficial: Many may not reach College, and as such, may not find the niche, withhout the breadth, that suits them. Besides they have the ability to combine different subjects and extract ideas from both, and recombine them: They would benefit from breadth rather than detail and complication at the earlier stages of their intellectual development.

adwithouthd
06-13-10, 12:41 AM
I do not outwardly criticise anyone, these are just thoughts that go through my head. Believe it or not.. I'm a very nice person as rule. I get a lot of enjoyment out of helping others and always have.

I don't mock others as you so rudely implied.. Please do not judge me by your own standards, thanks :)

I am merely curious about my own intelligence in comparison to others, maybe I'm not the best at communicating this.


I was just kidding. That question that I asked you about clapping-- those sorts of things used to occur to me when I was 5, 6. Of course, I reflected about it and now I direct my yearnings for analysis towads ideas-- I avoid criticiizing persons, however there are times I get carried away, because of ego (if something happens with someone).

adwithouthd
06-13-10, 12:57 AM
Well, I am diagnosed as primarily inattentive and am extroverted...

I used to be like that. Extroverted in the sense that always outside/with friends/ stuff. Howeve, the fundamental issue of daydreaming and losing tracks between convos was always there (so the convo would be going on, I wouldn't be following it, and contributing anything in it-- unless if it were something like politics which completely captured my interest). Hard to speak structurally in front of a group as well.

But something like that doesn't amount to extroversion (I think).

I just realized that with me there are two states of mind: Either I am totally distracted or not. That period contributed to me not studying at all and nowadays I am totally 'in the loop'. The way I think now is, whatever it takes, as I can't afford to eff up now.

fracturedstory
06-15-10, 04:05 AM
That's me. I've been referred to as the human version of a Golden Retriever.
I'm a house cat.

Carolann63362
06-16-10, 01:48 AM
I had a horrible time in school. I could not seem to understand most things in any of my classes, and if I did, I would forget it within seconds. Now that I look back on it, I wonder if that's why I always seemed to be off in another world. Maybe I was trying to bring myself to a happy place? lolo. I was very shy in school and almost had a heart attack when I had to get up in front of the class for something. I remember when I was in like 5th grade, in my favorite class,,(cause I had a crush on my teacher) lolol,,,,anyway,,,we were taking a test, and the room was so quiet you could hear a pin drop. Well apparently I was sitting there physically but mentally I was at home,,,lolol,,,,,well my teacher walked up behind me for some reason and tapped me on the shoulder,,,,well I was apparently mentally still at home and thought it was my sister teasing me, so I turned around and slapped him!!! lololol,,,,I was devastated when I realized what I did...
I always felt soo dumb, and I quit school in the beginning of my Freshmen year. It was always a struggle for me to learn and remember anything.
I got diagnosed a few months ago with inattentive ADD with severe depression and anxiety.
When that Doctor put me on Adderall, It was like I was in another world!! lol,,,,one that I could actually focus on. Then all the sudden it was like I was addicted to learning. It was like I was driven to learn anything I could get my hands on....imagine that? And it was like all the sudden I thought of things that "Normal" people learn in their teens and Im just now gettin it. Then I started having like these Epiphany's left and right.
I was in a constant state of "Oh my gosh!! I can't believe I didn't see that before!!"
So now I'm wondering if I really am a tad short on the brains,,,,or do I have normal brains and the ADD was just covering them up?
I'm still wondering what would have happened if I did not have ADD or was able to get help. Now Im 52 and would LOVE to go to school. How ironic:( But what I want to do would take too long. I would be 60 before I finally graduated!
sighhhh

WordMan
06-18-10, 12:08 AM
Carolann, what does it matter if you're 60 when you graduate?
First off, you probably wouldn't have to go part-time for eight years. You can probably earn credits for life experience. In fact, there's a wonderful, totally accredited distance learning college called Excelsior College that will take life experience, exams that show mastery of a subject, and courses at any accredited college and put them all together to help you reach your degree as fast as possible. It's absolutely totally legit. That's how I got my B.S. and it's never been questioned. Go to excelsior.edu.
Second, even if you were 60, isn't it better to be 60 and have your Bachelor's degree than to be 60 and not have it? You're going to be 60 either way. My father, may he rest in peace, obviously had ADD just like me, but he of course never knew it. Well, he got his bachelor's degree at the age of 60, in 1974. You should see his graduation photo, in his cap and gown. He was so proud of himself. He was absolutely glowing.

Layla771
07-21-10, 01:12 PM
Great thread!!

Yeah Carolann, you'll be 60 anyway, no? If you can afford it financially and time-wise, why not?

Barbara Sher has a book 'It's Only Too Late If You Don't Start Now'-?! ;)
and some great stories oline too..

WordMan, I admire your Dad!!

I was googling for a forum for gifted adults and found this board, and realized I was already a member here, lol!

Does anyone know of a good forum specifically for gifted adults?

I was a straight A student most of the school, and B+ most of the Uni, by personal decision that I did't want to be 'the smart kid' anymore..
I think I also had innattentive ADD, doodled at lessons (or wrote bad poetry/short stories), was bored a lot at school, few friendships (if any), more at Uni.. I still can't seem to figure out my life.. What to do career-wise.. Thought to go freelancing/start a biz or non-profit, can't seem to focus or get my priorities and decisions and time management in order..
I'm what Barbara Sher calls 'a scanner' - a person with MANY interests!
I think it would be all good if I were independently rich, lol!!

How does everyone else here make money, or have any sort of career?

ADXP
07-21-10, 01:44 PM
I was a valedictorian in elementary
& high school becoz my father donated
a chunk of land for both schools are located.And
my Aunt is married to the most influential people in our village.

I get through college (DMD)becoz of my Dad too.
I inherited his twisted sense of humor. I am a brilliant gifted
loser. I should apologize to those kids who got runned over due
to influences.

Jabbz
07-21-10, 03:07 PM
When I started 1st grade, I could not read. So the school put me in this trial program that taught kids how to read, or improve reading. When I finished the program I was reading at a 4th-5th grade level in the 1st grade(big difference there).

When I was in the 2nd we were asigned the make a mobile out of paper clips string, and squares of paper. Me and my partner made one that was symmetrical, had green and red reversing . Apparently, It was so awesome that I received a certificate for best mobile in the entire grade :D

Then 3rd grade came I was placed in magnet school because I was above average IQ. The only reason why I had such a hard time was that I was accused (spelling) of cheating. Which, Of course, I did because I couldn't concentrate on the test. My mind wondered around the room, to the different sounds. From kids outside, to scribbling of pencils. I Also believe the reason I did was because I knew the stuff it was so stinking easy I just didn't care. Well of course I got caught and ended up in ISS for 3 days. From then on out i was the kid people would put to and whisper how i was the lazy, creepy one.

People don't realize what I had to go through during school. I was always the kid who took jokes too far from the intended joke, or the one who said witty remarks backwards making people think i was stupid. I was the kid who had to follow people around because if I didn't I would be alone. I feared being alone. I still do. All the things I've done in my life have been because of my add. When I look at the past all i see is how cloudy my head was, how I wasn't in control it was like I was watching myself do things.

I know this is a long post but I have to talk about it. My GF of 3 years is trying to understand what i feel and I'm very grateful she is because I believe we'll get married in 4 years. I just hate how on the outside Im happy go lucky, it has helped me get through life. I was always the kid who got laughed at, the one who was not smart or funny but the one the other kids could make fun of and look "cool" for the girls. I was the one who was being called out in class or whatnot. To think of how much pain I have felt and still feel make me angry when I see some teen dressed like an emo or goth saying how they are so sad and depressed... they never got made fun of for being the "slow" kid, the dumb, the lazy, the one who doesn't try.

I want to continue this post since I can finally express what's flowing in my head. It's helping me keep my head from hurting right now. I mean how can I have gone through those years of torment and yet the ones who don't deserve the things they have STILL COMPLAIN! I just want to cry whenever I think of my childhood, not because of family or money but because it was full of fear, anxiety (which I learned to control which the bob marley song Little birdy), and just the fact that I did, in the entire 12 years of school, about 1 full year of homework combined. It wasn't because I was lazy, but because I saw no reason to memorize, learn, or study something that was completely useless to me.

Well there's my rant about being above average. Also if a teacher had a very difficult problem on the board, I would purposely hold the answer back. It was like I couldn't answer it because I had got it so fast the kids would think I cheated or w.e so I just kept my mouth shut. I will probably sit on the couch refreshing this post realize it's been a minute get depressed that people might think im spaz. With that I will let this post commence.

Layla771
07-21-10, 03:29 PM
Hey ADXP, wanted to suggest you to marry me :) - but seems we're both girls! If you're rich, who cares if you're a loser! (you're not a loser, just 'eccentric'!!) On the other hand, my Dad just wants me to start moneymaking or get a rich husband! lol!

Jabbz, so sorry you had to go through all that!! It sounds frightening yet oddly fascinating! I'm glad I never went to a 'gifted' school or program! (Though I longed for one but there just wasn't anything here.. ) You're lucky to have a GF, and an understanding one!!
I often didn't say things or didn't ask questions in school cause I wanted to be 'invisible' and not stick out much too.. With any luck the bully guys would get bald and sucky jobs and you'll be a successful CEO or something!! You sound a bit like Einstein!!
The education systems need much to be improved, yup.. I have had ideas to improve it once, but then got a bit disillusioned with that too..

pittguy578
07-25-10, 03:41 AM
I was regarded gifted and very bright, but had inconsistent performance when it came subjects I had no interest in. Writing research papers was the most difficult thing for me-I had a hard time organizing everything, etc. I still graduated college with a high QPA (3.81). However, the inability to write papers had killed dreams of becoming a political science professor.

Jabbz
07-25-10, 03:34 PM
I was regarded gifted and very bright, but had inconsistent performance when it came subjects I had no interest in. Writing research papers was the most difficult thing for me-I had a hard time organizing everything, etc. I still graduated college with a high QPA (3.81). However, the inability to write papers had killed dreams of becoming a political science professor.


I couldn't write research papers so I just either never did them or turned them in late. I hated how I was required to research something and then write what I had learned without using the same wording. What happens when you tell something a different way, that's right it becomes corrupted in the sense that one word could mean something different. It also annoyed me that when you take notes you leave out a lot of information, why not enjoy everything about something instead of choosing what MIGHT be important.

Covenant
07-25-10, 05:29 PM
Share your aversion to writing those kinds of reports or worse, article reviews, where you basically have to compress someone elses articles into your own story. (Usually a rather compact story) Have to omit so much information of which I think it could be important. Do see the point to it now, after a few of them, allows you to get general information about certain things in a small compact article and then if necessary the reader can search for the additional details on his own.

So whenever I'm faced with one of these papers I just try to recompose my goals for the paper from providing lots of information that I like, to what they want you to write. It's not always working though ;)

Kunga Dorji
07-25-10, 06:49 PM
Carolann, what does it matter if you're 60 when you graduate?
First off, you probably wouldn't have to go part-time for eight years. You can probably earn credits for life experience. In fact, there's a wonderful, totally accredited distance learning college called Excelsior College that will take life experience, exams that show mastery of a subject, and courses at any accredited college and put them all together to help you reach your degree as fast as possible. It's absolutely totally legit. That's how I got my B.S. and it's never been questioned. Go to excelsior.edu.
Second, even if you were 60, isn't it better to be 60 and have your Bachelor's degree than to be 60 and not have it? You're going to be 60 either way. My father, may he rest in peace, obviously had ADD just like me, but he of course never knew it. Well, he got his bachelor's degree at the age of 60, in 1974. You should see his graduation photo, in his cap and gown. He was so proud of himself. He was absolutely glowing.

Another point is that we should not confuse degrees with intellect.
There is no way I would go back to study nowadays- fitting in to somebody else's checklist of what they think is important just is not the way I get my jollies nowadays. Some of the smartest people I know are virtually self educated. One of the stupidest people I know is a professor of psychiatry.( The one who missed the diagnosis of ADD in myself for 14 years).:rolleyes:

mechnik
08-08-10, 03:25 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicatt
I, for one, feel there is a correlation between having AD/HD and being of above average intelligence. It would certainly be something very interesting to study.





Actually there isn't a causative correlation between the two. In fact most AD/HD adults with IQ≥120 go undiagnosed for a long time. Statistically, we are "outliers."



Statistically, Correlation does not imply causation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Correlation_does_not_imply_causation)
Thank you for the Yale study link.

mechnik
08-08-10, 05:23 PM
I tested at well over the "genius" mark... only reason I got into college was because I got a perfect score on my ACTs. I graduated college with a 2.48 :-(... thank you for ADD :-(. I could read stuff 100 times in college... couldn't make it stick for a test.

Exactly same UG GPA here.
They say early success before one learns how to apply his efforts is much worse than struggling and doing poorly in school.
I rocketed through my large urban high school academically and scored very high on standardized tests. Did not learn to express my thoughts coherently in writing, nor learn independently, and fell apart once I entered the hallowed halls of Ivy.

here comes fun
08-11-10, 08:44 AM
Yep, I was in the gifted program in high school. I barely graduated though. I'm also a talented artist (no modesty there!:D) I know deep down that I'm smart- I just seem to exhibit a lot of evidence to the contrary. :rolleyes: That stuff can really get to you after a while, you know?

I hear you man.

Canuck223
12-05-10, 07:32 PM
I had a period in grade one where my reading was well behind the curve. Then I caught up and raced to the top of the class. I stayed there until grade 10. From that point on, as the courses got harder and less personally interesting, my grades began to slip. Not much, but I went from A+'s down to B's.

University was a disaster. I couldn't focus, prioritize, or motivate myself.

lynette19775
12-05-10, 07:53 PM
I was in a gifted class in elementary and middle school (the kind where they bus you off from your regular school and then drop you off at a classroom that looks like a science lab with an explosion of colorful pictures on the wall and toothpick bridges students have made, for a couple of hours each day). But I hated the extra attention that brought me. I never wanted to stand out from the crowd and found it embarrassing.

But I always only did the least I could get by with without bringing the wrath of my parents upon me. I always waited until the very last minute to do everything and then spent a couple hours in an insanely rapid cyclone of frustration to complete it. When I was done, I always felt wiped out.

I was a B & C average student but applied myself as little as I could.

This changed in college, but that was only because I had my baby son for motivation to do a better job. However, I never did stop the "procrastinating then scrambling to get it done" cycle. In fact, I still employ that method most of the time.

Fortune
12-06-10, 02:07 AM
I know this is inattentive and I am probably combined (although like barely combined if I am not inattentive) but I don't care:

I have a lot of bitterness about being labeled as gifted in school and the expectations imposed on me, and the lack of belief in the trouble I had with everything because of it. I heard far too much that I was smart enough and just needed to apply myself more.

I did go to gifted classes which were pretty nice. I got to have hands on experience with computers in the 5th grade (79-80) with TRS-80s and Apple ][s (color versions even), although I would say the classes were very boring because there was too much lecture and not enough hands on experience.

Paradoxically I actually was able to start getting good grades in college, but the stress of maintaining that work (which was for the first time ever, something that made me feel like it was for me instead of for someone who constantly held threats of violence and abuse over my head) made it difficult for me to manage more than two semesters before I just dropped out and couldn't handle the work at all.

Surly Dave
12-06-10, 01:52 PM
Wow. Glad to know I'm not the only one who has to deal with this stuff. I made it through school on my ability to ace tests, but getting the darn home work done was impossible, so I pretty much graduated with 'C's. They knew I knew the material, but because ADHD was pretty much unheard of when I was in school, I was diagnosed what "Acute Laziness", which carries with it a stigma worse than alcoholism.

bof00
12-06-10, 02:35 PM
Wow. Glad to know I'm not the only one who has to deal with this stuff. I made it through school on my ability to ace tests, but getting the darn home work done was impossible, so I pretty much graduated with 'C's. They knew I knew the material, but because ADHD was pretty much unheard of when I was in school, I was diagnosed what "Acute Laziness", which carries with it a stigma worse than alcoholism.

LOL, yeah, same here. Acing tests was my thing. It was always "He needs to apply himself. He can do math problems in his head in seconds that takes others minutes on paper, but he won't do the homework" Why does it matter if you know it? Isn't the purpose of teaching for the pupil to learn, not write useless information?

kalmnight
12-06-10, 05:19 PM
I really couldn't tell you how much of my schooling was spent not doing anything remotely related to school work and yet I managed to get by with As and Bs.

At some point in highschool I just gave up completely and coasted on out doing just enough. Still my just enough was still enough to come out with a 3.33 GPA.

Now however at the point that I NEED to pay attention trying to juggle work, school, and kids ... its a different story.

I wish I could go back and change things. Its hard though, would anyone have been able to diagnose me then, given how I was apparently smarter than pretty much everyone else in my class? How would I have know there was a problem. The only reason I knew I had a problem now was because I got to a point that I needed to be on task and on the ball more than I could make myself be.

I can't imagine being one of those people who manages to make it through medschool and to take their clinicals when the limits of their intelligence finally meets the limits of their ADHD.

lynette19775
12-06-10, 08:37 PM
Wow. Glad to know I'm not the only one who has to deal with this stuff. I made it through school on my ability to ace tests, but getting the darn home work done was impossible, so I pretty much graduated with 'C's. They knew I knew the material, but because ADHD was pretty much unheard of when I was in school, I was diagnosed what "Acute Laziness", which carries with it a stigma worse than alcoholism.

Hahaha! "Acute laziness"! :D Ah man, if only I had a dollar for everytime someone has called me lazy in my life, I'd be richer than Bill Gates!!!!

coykoi
12-11-10, 02:47 AM
I'm one too! Learned to read ridiculously early, got put in the gifted classes and all that jazz. All my life I've done pretty well in spite of the ADHD.

I only got diagnosed about 4 days ago, but it was a long time coming. I had been trying to tell various doctors for years that I had trouble concentrating. I'd always get some variation on, "oh, but you went to [great college] and you go to [great grad school], you're obviously doing fine!"

But it's not about whether I'm doing "fine" (and why does a doctor get to decide what is "good enough" for me, anyway?) It's about that I feel frustrated as heck that I can't focus, and that I know that I could be doing better. It's that I can't stand that my actions don't match up with my thoughts. It isn't apathy; I care a lot, especially when I'm in a position where I'm accountable to others, and I do not like letting people down when I don't get things done.

Having my concerns brushed off so many times, I started to wonder if maybe they were right. Maybe I was naturally lazy and scatterbrained. Or maybe I was in the wrong field of study or line of work, and it would all click once I got in the right place. Nope. For the most part, my inability to focus followed me.

Then I went to my new psychiatrist. Turned out I had at least 8/9 of the "inattentive type" criteria. Then she explained to me that a lot of people with ADHD are highly intelligent people who have done well academically in spite of their ADHD - but they're getting Bs when they have the potential to be getting As. Um, story of my life!

So here's my message to you: if doctors aren't taking you seriously, do not lose hope. Keep trying. There is someone out there who will understand.

ImissATARI
12-17-10, 04:34 PM
I would always test top 5% in my class on standarized tests and found school easy. Anything i could get done in class would be great but NEVER did homework all while getting A's on a majority of my tests.

School bored me

Left me with a solid c- average through school.

scarygreengiant
12-17-10, 05:14 PM
There is no correlation between high IQ and ADHD. Here is some research.

The IQs of children with ADHD are normally distributed.
Authors: Kaplan, Bonnie J., Crawford, Susan G., Dewey, Deborah M., Fisher, Geoff C.
The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether or not attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—when there was an absence of reading problems—was associated with having a high IQ. The vocabulary and block design short forms of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC)-3rd Edition were administered to 63 children with ADHD, 69 children with reading difficulties (RD), and 68 children with comorbid ADHD + RD. Results indicated that the distributions of estimated Full Scale IQs (FSIQ) for each of the 3 groups of children did not differ significantly from a normal distribution, with the majority of children (more than 50%) in each group scoring in the average range. The percentage of children with ADHD who scored in the above-average range for FSIQ was not significantly higher than the percentages of children in the other 2 groups. No significant group differences emerged for estimated FSIQ, vocabulary, or block design. It was concluded that children with ADHD are no more likely to have an above-average IQ than are other children.

Performance of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-Combined subtype on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Fifth Edition.
Author: Blashko, Paula Corey, U Alberta, Canada
The psychopathology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) consists of the behavioural symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness, is well recognized in children and adolescents, and is reported as one of the most frequently seen problems in child psychology and psychiatry. Although there has been concern about the utility of IQ tests in helping to diagnose ADHD, the ability of psychometric tests to provide information properties on a variety of constructs is thought to provide useful clinical information about the higher cortical functions in children with ADHD. The development and release of the of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Fifth Edition (SB5) presents an opportunity to examine the nature of intellectual functioning, via examination of profile patterns, in special populations. This study compared the profile patterns of children with ADHD-Combined subtype (ADHD-C) and normal Controls, on the SB5. This study employed an ex post facto design, comparing the archival data of 29 participants with ADHD-C to 50 participants in the Control group. The Full Scale IQs for the ADHD-C and Control groups were analyzed and compared using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) procedure. The Verbal and Nonverbal IQs, and factor scores of the two groups were analyzed and compared using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Further stepwise discriminant function analysis was used to examine if group membership could be predicted based on the SB5 scores. The results of this study indicate that children with ADHD-C and children in the Control group do not differ significantly on the Full Scale IQ, Nonverbal IQ, or Verbal IQ. When examining the five factor indexes it was observed that the two groups do differ significantly on the Working Memory factor. Further examination of Working Memory at the subtest level found that children with ADHD-C displayed significantly lower performance on the Nonverbal Working Memory subtest but not on the Verbal Working Memory subtest scores when compared to their Control group counterparts. A secondary analysis employing stepwise discriminant function analysis indicated that the two groups, in this study, could be differentiated from each other with 82.3% accuracy base on the subtests scores obtained on Working Memory.

Intellectual functioning in adults with ADHD: A meta-analytic examination of full scale IQ differences between adults with and without ADHD.
Authors: Bridgett, David J., Walker, Michael E., Stephen F.
Although attention has been given to the intellectual functioning of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) relative to their non-ADHD peers, few studies have examined intellectual functioning in adults with ADHD. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine differences in intellectual ability between adults with and without ADHD via a meta-analytic review. Of the 33 studies meeting inclusion criteria, primary analyses focused on 18 studies representing 1,031 adults with ADHD and 928 non-ADHD, nonclinical comparison adults and containing Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS; D. Wechsler, 1955, 1981, 1994) Full Scale IQ scores or estimates. A significant effect was found such that adults with ADHD scored lower than non-ADHD adults on WAIS intelligence tests. However, this difference was small and not clinically meaningful. The presence of several moderators reflecting characteristics of the ADHD samples and study methodology suggested that only a subset of adults with ADHD (e.g., those with comorbid disorders) may experience lower general intellectual ability relative to non-ADHD comparison adults. Implications of the findings for clinical and research settings are presented as well as suggestions for improving methodology and reporting in future research.

Bhavinuwo
12-17-10, 10:33 PM
me too! people always tell me stuff like that. i hate how they are surprised at my intelligence. it makes me worried that i come off as a moron.

Urgh....story of my life. It was the worst feeling, people having high expectations and you answer back with "meh" marks because in this day and age, its all about grades instead of your individual personality and talent.

Tommy Wilhelm
12-18-10, 01:46 AM
I don't know where I stand with this. From what I can remember of being a kid, I got average to bad grades, depending on the subject, and that studying some of it was pretty painful. God, I can still remember this whirlwind of anxiety and bad feeling from writing some thing about bison, back in grade three, and how bad I felt afterwards getting the paper back, because of my grade, because finishing it had finally felt so heroic, and the grade was no good when I finally got it back: the teacher said, "I hope you're angry at yourself," when I said "damnit," or whatever.

Tangent there. But stuff like this would happen, but for a while, I was still considered smart for some reason. I can remember a parent teacher meeting, when it had really started to go downhill in grade four, where my mom kept talking to the teacher like it was just some mixup, and he wasn't having it, you could tell; I felt embarrassed for her, or of her. Later, when I was doing even worse, she got me some book called "the gifted kids survival guide". I felt bitter about it; all these stories of kids too bored to do well, like their grades were from their contempt almost -and I just didn't get it.

Then I was mostly quietly not good. In highschool, there'd be the odd arts teacher who thought I was bright, but the rest was failure.

Did passably well in college, well enough for someone outside the club, in university. So, there's the life of my genius.

Misterydwn
12-21-10, 12:39 AM
I just don't tell people I have ADHD-I. It's too complicated, and you always get that knee-jerk reaction "well everyone has a hard time with doing things sometimes". Yeah, but it's not your whole freaking life! :mad:

People just don't get it :rolleyes:


Thank you for writing what I have been going through the past week. I tested "gifted" in third grade but always felt like I didn't belong because I was always struggling to get everything completed on time in school. I wish they would just give us the assignment, and make the deadline TOMORROW. That way I could just get it done and move on. But, on the other hand, I do find myself kind of thinking about the assignment off and on over the weeks, then at the last minute all the ideas I didn't know I had start coming out.

Funny, the next day I often read my work and am impressed (more like surprised) by what I came up with. Unfortunately, I don't always get it done on time, which cost me my high school graduation ceremony. Still have my diploma- but had to take English 101 at a community college. Not allowed to walk due to one too many late assignments. I think my final gpa was 3.1. I could have done so much better, but honestly I felt like why TORTURE myself for a grade when I can get by with this? I would love to be successful, always thought I had a deep fear of success that was really holding me back. I went to an affluent high school but I was from the bottom of the mountain, where the poor kids lived. I Everyone I went to highschool with are way, WAY ahead of me, with degrees and careers and houses.

I have tried college nine different times at seven different schools, all ending with me just dropping all my classes. I can finish a semester with flying colors, but the next one I fail. Again. I always am painfully aware I could have done even better if I had just applied myself more. I have moved 21 times in the past 13 years, mostly due to another exciting adventure that has yet to pan out. I have had 28 jobs in the past 16 years. Usually a love/hate relationship. My coworkers that get me usually love me. The others not so much. And after I master a position, I have always ulitmately failed or quit or sold the business, anything to escape. I feel like I NEED freedom, can't feel trapped. I am claustrophibic emotionally and physically.

SOOOO impulsive. I was completely sexually harassed at a job interview. "You are a goddess. Do you have a boyfriend? Does he kiss your feet? I would. My wife says I can be with other women. I am 30 years older than you, I shouldn't be feeling this way." Then he says "Lets go to Starbuck's and come back and lock the door." And the nail in the coffin? "If you just relax and help me out I can get you the job." I called a lawyer who took my case and wrote up the state claim. For a $100,000. And they said there was a federal claim. All they needed from me was $375 for the filing fee. That is it, rest contingency. They never gave me a deadline, and I am so impulsive with my money but scared to not have any on me that I couldn't ever come up with it, while making $5000 a month combined with bf. IMPOSSIBLE. I almost just deleted that amount because that is so ridiculous. Our rent is $765. TMI maybe but must share the detail so you can see just how insane this is.

I would diligently write out a chart every payday that had all the bills to pay, and what I could remember coming up. Usually everything is late already and playing catch up. And the weed problem definitely definitely definitely exacerbates the situation. I would honestly tell the lawyer when I was planning on paying them, the amount in full, which was usually about 2 pay periods out. Unfortunately, I would always think "We can afford that, we have X dollars in bank still" and then wind up with nothing left. Then have to tell the lawyer again, another month. They never seemed to care and the statute of limitations had months so I was concerned and felt bad, but it wasn't enough to push it into my "must pay this pay period or else" category. All of a sudden, 2 days before I was due to pay them, an email with attachments. Uh-oh I thought. I was right. A nice letter stating they were dropping me as a client. I managed an email back, full well knowing I didn't deserve another chance, but none the less asking they let me pay them. No answer. Ouch.

I have a four year old daughter with my husband that I am seperated from. He moved 2 hours away and now has her during the week and I have her on weekends. I am a complete mess with out her. I can't get my finances in order to get a lawyer or even a non-lawyer divorce ($477 filing fee in Oregon). REALLY hoping a lawsuit would help with a custody battle. K. Nough history. If u are still reading, to answer my actual reply was supposed to say:

My mom saw the documentary "ADD & Loving It" a week ago and talked me into looking it up and my "A-Ha" moment happened. THIS is what has been plaguing me FOREVER. Ironically, I was diagnosed in 93 when I was 11, on ritalin for a couple weeks, told mom I didn't like it, and that was that. Tested into gifted program in third grade and although struggled to get, no one ever thought anything about it. I was just kind of bad. Didn't pay attention in class, late work, late work and late work. Know what my sister told me yesterday when I shared to good ADHD news with her? My chaotic childhood and too much weed were to blame. My grandma, after I told her I was always turing in late work, said that I got used to turning in late work and got lazy. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.

Tommy Wilhelm
12-21-10, 01:51 AM
I've been too self-deprecating. In post-secondary, I felt I could make connections others often couldn't; I entertained hazy ideas that I was cut out for something great. I was wrong probably, but I wasn't crazy to think so.

Simenora
04-18-11, 12:05 PM
I had said once that I thought that a possible reason that we are seen as flighty, scattered or damaged is that we speak a different language. It leads to misunderstandings. My husband, also gifted and ADHD, agreed as did others. It seems that this analogy rings true for so many. Any thoughts?

Phayah
04-18-11, 12:17 PM
I think being labeled gifted in school really screwed me over. Everyone had such high expectations from me but I gave them failure after failure. The amount of guilt, shame, and frustration I felt was unreal. They called me lazy, loser, trouble-maker, freak.

I struggled so hard to PROVE I was just as good as them but I never was.

Eventually, I believed what everyone said about me. I gave up. I'm not sure if I will ever be able to convince myself otherwise.

jmale
04-18-11, 12:21 PM
I hate being told I can't have ADHD because I am successful, or because I am intelligent. People don't seem to realize I am more disappointed when I fail to accomplish something with myself, than they are ever at me. Then to be told I was just being lazy, or chose not to..irritates me.

Mesaana
04-18-11, 12:28 PM
i was "academically gifted" in grade school, and i hated it. i don't remember how i was tested or determined to be academically gifted, but i just remember going to the classes. i had so much pressure put on me to be a perfect student, that by the middle of 9th grade i had completely fallen apart and stopped going to classes. when i was young, i remember being very socially awkward, i did my best to avoid all notice and if somehow i was called on in class, i would most likely burst out in tears because my mind would go blank and i would just start stuttering. by 10th grade, i just accepted that i was different, and hung out with the "freaks". i built up my walls, so that nobody could hurt me. if somebody stared at me, i would threaten them. my best friend sonya and i were somewhat feared, sometimes looked up to, and definitely misunderstood. despite having a very rocky upbringing until i was about 23, i have managed to get help (therapy and meds), and i now have finally completed college (after dropping out 4 times) and have a job as a medical records technician/medical assistant at a cardiology practice. whether being "gifted" helped me in anyway or not, i do not know.

OntheFence
04-18-11, 12:51 PM
I hate being told I can't have ADHD because I am successful, or because I am intelligent. People don't seem to realize I am more disappointed when I fail to accomplish something with myself, than they are ever at me. Then to be told I was just being lazy, or chose not to..irritates me.

Absolutely. If I ever bring up ADD, I get the feeling that my friends/ family think I'm making excuses because I was never treated for ADD as a child and I was pretty successful in school. But once I got into the working world, I was totally unequipped. In school, I felt like a success, more or less. When I entered the working world, I felt like a complete failure. Granted, there were other factors involved in this. I've been in a couple of bad situations that were out of my control, but I also probably picked the wrong career to begin with.

Not to change the subject, but it seems like career choice is more critical for ADD'ers than for others. I think choosing the wrong line of work for an ADD'er can turn out to feel like torture.

But when an ADD'er finds a line of work that he/she can get excited about and truly has an interest in, he/she can really take off and do big things.

OntheFence
04-18-11, 01:12 PM
I had said once that I thought that a possible reason that we are seen as flighty, scattered or damaged is that we speak a different language. It leads to misunderstandings. My husband, also gifted and ADHD, agreed as did others. It seems that this analogy rings true for so many. Any thoughts?

I think we might just think faster, and think in a couple different directions at the same time, if that makes sense. I think we also have a tendency to skip ahead in the conversation to where we think it's headed, or should be headed. Just as staying on task is typically difficult for the ADD brain, so can be staying on the point in a conversation, debate or argument.

I think a lot of us have a tendency to shift the focus of a conversation, and so the conversation can get confusing. If it's really bad, eventually you forget about the original main point of the conversation entirely!! One of my closest friends is totally ADD, and our conversations are just a disaster! There is zero structure.

I'm not saying this is the case with everybody, but I don't think this is uncommon in the ADD population. We probably have a greater tendency for thinking about what we are going to say next rather than listening to what the other person is saying. This is certainly not unique to people with ADD, but I think its easier for us to fall into that trap.

Lastly, I think the ADD population has a greater tendency to persevere in an argument and keep it going, until we win....and get the last word. Once we zero in an on some specific goal, we pursue it doggedly. We are generally more aggressive in that respect, although a lot of this has to do with the personality of the individual. Not everybody with ADD is aggressive or persistent in this way.

jmale
04-18-11, 03:56 PM
But when an ADD'er finds a line of work that he/she can get excited about and truly has an interest in, he/she can really take off and do big things.


I completely agree. I am lucky that my field I thoroughly enjoy, computers. I am probably online in one way or another the entire time I am awake. My computer is connected to my 42" TV at home, and I use it more than cable. First thing I do in the morning is check e-mail, forums, youtube, random other thing, shower, more checking, goto work(8 hrs on computer with 4 monitors), come home more youtube/forums/news/other.. I'll watch the same American idol, america's got talent, or glee performance over and over(I love music), or read about the latest Japan nuclear fiasco, read forums about my motorcycle, my car, music, and now adhd.. maybe some tv with picture in a picture going so I can do both TV and computer, and eventually bed.

However, even a career choice I enjoy and loved at the beginning it has 'worn off', I had some tremendous growth my first few years, and now that i've hit a 'plateau', I am starting to slack in the volume of work I accomplish. Basically as far as I can get rapidly, the last of multiple positions created for me by filling voids, and now it's more expected for me to 'settle in', and develop this new position into an eventual department.

Once the excitement, and rapid growth went away so did my productivity. I don't get in trouble at work, and accomplish more than expected of me..but I know I could do more, and honestly always anxious someone is going to realize I am doing a fraction of the output I cam 'capable' of..

I have my second appointment Friday, hopefully she'll have some insight.

uncle shrek
04-18-11, 05:25 PM
i was a failure at school but above average at college.there are many forms of intelligence,one of them being common sense.high grades dont make for an intelligent person.ive known educated people do the most stupid things.

always remember,a fool can do something smart and no one remembers,but a genius can do something dumb and no one forgets!

a genius can waste his intellect,but an idiot has plenty of stupidity to go around

Offle
04-18-11, 06:27 PM
I've always tested in the gifted range. They wanted to place in the gifted program in elementary school but my mom refused to put me in it. She didn't like the idea of adding extra stress on to the load with my home life and ADHD. She said that she would keep in mind for the future but she didn't want me in it at the moment. My teacher tried to talk her into it but my mom said I was happy in school for the first time in my life and she didn't want to mess that up and I've always been very thankful for that.

I've never consider taking special courses. I've never wanted to be in honors classes or AP classes. I've never seen the point. If I can happily get by in regular classes without stressing myself out why would I add on harder work? After high school and college I don't think anyone else is going to care about whether I took AP english my senior year of high school or whether I was in any honor classes in college.

OntheFence
04-19-11, 01:42 PM
I completely agree. I am lucky that my field I thoroughly enjoy, computers. I am probably online in one way or another the entire time I am awake. My computer is connected to my 42" TV at home, and I use it more than cable. First thing I do in the morning is check e-mail, forums, youtube, random other thing, shower, more checking, goto work(8 hrs on computer with 4 monitors), come home more youtube/forums/news/other.. I'll watch the same American idol, america's got talent, or glee performance over and over(I love music), or read about the latest Japan nuclear fiasco, read forums about my motorcycle, my car, music, and now adhd.. maybe some tv with picture in a picture going so I can do both TV and computer, and eventually bed.

However, even a career choice I enjoy and loved at the beginning it has 'worn off', I had some tremendous growth my first few years, and now that i've hit a 'plateau', I am starting to slack in the volume of work I accomplish. Basically as far as I can get rapidly, the last of multiple positions created for me by filling voids, and now it's more expected for me to 'settle in', and develop this new position into an eventual department.

Once the excitement, and rapid growth went away so did my productivity. I don't get in trouble at work, and accomplish more than expected of me..but I know I could do more, and honestly always anxious someone is going to realize I am doing a fraction of the output I cam 'capable' of..

I have my second appointment Friday, hopefully she'll have some insight.

I know exactly what you mean. I can get interested in just about anything, so when I start a job, that's when my interest is the highest. I have all kinds of optimism and great ideas.....After a while, there's not anything new or interesting to learn, and repetition takes over. Add to that the stress of just having an important job (for example, where the decisions I make can affect things like other people's bonus checks), with a lot of responsibility that presents challenges on a daily basis - and my general disposition starts to become more negative. If you add some other morale-lowering factor on top of those things, then I can go as far as to just become apathetic, bored, and depressed.

BTW, I've noticed that people with ADD tend to be drawn towards IT and they seem to really be able to latch onto it and excel. Another area would be small business ownership/ sales (of an interesting product, for example, custom software solutions - that's a real example of someone I know). Basically, professions and jobs that tend to give the person a large creative license/ flexibility/ decision making power - this sort of characteristic seems to suit the ADD personality better, in my opinion.

OntheFence
04-19-11, 02:07 PM
I've never consider taking special courses. I've never wanted to be in honors classes or AP classes. I've never seen the point. If I can happily get by in regular classes without stressing myself out why would I add on harder work?

This is another post that I can identify with 1000% (mainly the bold part below).

I didn't fit into any category in high school. I wasn't quite a "nerd" (although fundamentally, I'm most definitely a nerd) because I just didn't care as much as those other kids, but I still associated with them (mostly for academic purposes, not social). They didn't really see me as one of them, and neither did I want them to....I was in the National Honor Society, but only for token reasons. I just thought that I "should" because I was told that it would be good for my college application.

My more rebellious side caused me to associate and become friends with the less academically ambitious crowd like the stoners, musicians, etc. Now, a lot of these kids would initially think I was part of the "nerd" crowd because I did pretty well with grades and I did study more than most of them.

I took a single AP class in high school by choice. The "nerd" crowd, overachiever types would take at least one or two every semester. I probably could've taken a year off of my college career had I taken more of these classes - In hindsight, I really wish I would have.

Throughout school, even through college, I would usually take the path of least resistance. I'd take the easiest classes I could. I really had no interest in challenging myself. One reason for this was the anxiety and stress that having a heavy workload causes me. I cannot handle too much at any given time because studying just takes me a really long time....I'm just slow at everything. I'm the last to finish tests (and I rarely finish sections on standardized tests), it takes me the longest of anyone to study, it takes me the longest to finish homework/ assignments. Writing papers always takes me longer than anyone else, etc, etc. Part of that comes from this compulsion I have to need to learn and really understand every last detail of every last concept covered.

Simenora
05-07-11, 01:06 AM
I hate being told I can't have ADHD because I am successful, or because I am intelligent. People don't seem to realize I am more disappointed when I fail to accomplish something with myself, than they are ever at me. Then to be told I was just being lazy, or chose not to..irritates me.

When I went to get assessed the psychologist told me that she "highly doubted" that she'd find adhd. She told me that we would likely uncover GAD or such. At the end of eight hours of testing she told me that I had severe combined type. I said that could explain why I have never held a job more than 3 years without ever having been fired in 25.

Simenora
05-07-11, 01:18 AM
This is another post that I can identify with 1000% (mainly the bold part below).

I didn't fit into any category in high school. I wasn't quite a "nerd" (although fundamentally, I'm most definitely a nerd) because I just didn't care as much as those other kids, but I still associated with them (mostly for academic purposes, not social). They didn't really see me as one of them, and neither did I want them to....I was in the National Honor Society, but only for token reasons. I just thought that I "should" because I was told that it would be good for my college application.

My more rebellious side caused me to associate and become friends with the less academically ambitious crowd like the stoners, musicians, etc. Now, a lot of these kids would initially think I was part of the "nerd" crowd because I did pretty well with grades and I did study more than most of them.

I took a single AP class in high school by choice. The "nerd" crowd, overachiever types would take at least one or two every semester. I probably could've taken a year off of my college career had I taken more of these classes - In hindsight, I really wish I would have.

Throughout school, even through college, I would usually take the path of least resistance. I'd take the easiest classes I could. I really had no interest in challenging myself. One reason for this was the anxiety and stress that having a heavy workload causes me. I cannot handle too much at any given time because studying just takes me a really long time....I'm just slow at everything. I'm the last to finish tests (and I rarely finish sections on standardized tests), it takes me the longest of anyone to study, it takes me the longest to finish homework/ assignments. Writing papers always takes me longer than anyone else, etc, etc. Part of that comes from this compulsion I have to need to learn and really understand every last detail of every last concept covered.

when I started to look into a program for my son (he was reading at college level in grade 2) I spoke with a principal at an AP focused school. He told me point blank, "this program is not for your son, it is for bright grinders" I am really happy he put me off. My son is in a gifted program that recognizes the challenges and idiosyncrasies of gifted individuals. There are 15 children in his class from grade 1 to 6.

mcmom42
07-03-11, 12:52 PM
I have to say that as I am a newbie here and newly diagnosed with ADHD Inattentive, that reading this whole thread has brought me to tears. Not of sadness, more of relief.

At 42 years old I have struggled all my life with thinking I was deficient or lazy or even stupid even though I always tested as being "gifted" and deep down I knew I was smart or at the very least full of potential. I felt like I squandered all the opportunities that have come my way, only getting lucky in being able to be successful in my career. I've always felt like I was faking my level of intelligence because at home I felt like I wasn't because I couldn't seem to finish a book, or work hard on a project or presentation. I just found a way to get by. I read was I had to to perform enough to APPEAR like I knew what I was talking about. I created devices that made me look like I was functioning at a high level. I knew I was functioning at 25% of what I could be doing all along. To think what I could have done if I had known earlier.

I am indescribably grateful for this forum here I just stumbled upon a few hours ago. I cry because I'm not alone. It's just hit me.

tired1823
07-03-11, 03:24 PM
I did the exact same thing with coping mechanisms. I was in gifted programs too when I was younger... and before the diagnosis I always knew inside that if I worked hard enough I could make straight a's. I did that twice in my life and they were the happiest semesters for me. I found out I had adhd after college. I found an article on the difference between adhd children and NT children in gifted programs. Kind of makes sense... http://www.addvance.com/help/parents/gifted_child.html
http://www.primarilyinattentiveadd.com/2010/03/inattentive-adhd-or-gifted.html ( I'm not sure if you have inattentive adhd or not.)

If you don't mind me asking what is your career and how did you get started? Also, what were your gifted strengths?

mcmom42
07-04-11, 09:16 AM
If you don't mind me asking what is your career and how did you get started? Also, what were your gifted strengths?

Thank you for the articles. They both hit home for me and my son. My son and I were both diagnosed with Inattentive - him about a year ago, me a few weeks ago.

Currently I work as a Director in a marketing department in the healthcare industry. I went to three colleges with the third being an art school where I received my Associates degree. The first two both started out great but never finished my bachelor's degree. Story of my life!

My gifted strengths were mostly in fine arts and math. I sold oil paintings as a child, studied and excelled at violin, voice, dance, and baton twirling for more than 14 years. I remember being "naturally" good at all of them but unwilling or unable to practice for more than a few minutes at a time. It wasn't until college where I continued voice and dance that my shortcomings showed themselves. Math and science were just subjects I understood conceptually pretty easily but when it became "work" I was more likely to get an F or a D than an A or B.

Having design skills I was able to work my way up the ladder moving from graphic design to web design to managing a national magazine. I somehow was always able to focus when I was designing and painting but never anything else. I've since authored a book and am a year into my new marketing job. My book did well but I recall waiting until the last minute to really pull it together. Again, I did just enough to get by. I'm finding now that some of these characteristics are similar to others diagnosed with Inattentive.

hopeandgrace
10-14-11, 01:50 AM
I absolutely love this thread! I can relate to so many of you :)

I was not officially tested as gifted, but was very close. It's actually a funny story to tell because I was so distracted during that test that I didn't finish it. I actually had about 15 of the 75ish multiple choice questions left on the gifted test to do, and ended up not completing it all. The teacher put me in the gifted class anyway, since my score was pretty close.

It was grade 6, and it was my very first scantron ever. Based on my siblings' scores, I have a very strong hunch that I am gifted as well. Being gifted and having high grades is actually not a good thing for inattentive ADHD though, because I ended up developing coping mechanisms for my symptoms until now (4th year of university).