View Full Version : Meth Mouth


LVG
09-26-08, 12:14 AM
Meth Mouth is a ...let's say VERY bad side effect of amphetamines. ( I just saw that other thread about this - but I figure I'll ask again for any other recent experiences)

It occurs primarily in crystal meth users, but also happens with methylphenidate (Ritalin) and dexemethylphenidate (Dexedrine) users.

Has anyone here had problems with dental hygiene?

I had been on dexedrine (switched from Ritalin) for almost 3 weeks but stopped it because I was getting weird heart beats / arrythmia.

I've noticed that since I started dexedrine (and the methylphenidate before) my craving for sweets has tripled and I drink 4-5 sodas a day. I don't brush my teeth at night now and I wake up with bleeding gums. Througout the day I can feel my mouth drying up and just..feeling gross. According to web sites that describe meth mouth, that's how it starts.

So, anyone on dexedrine have problems? I can tell I'm starting already, so I think I'm done forever with dexedrine.

watts
09-26-08, 06:15 AM
You're kidding right?

Meth mouth is a catch phrase used by the media in the war on drugs and specifically methamphetamine.

"methmouth" occurs as a result of poor dental hygeine/ no dental hygeine, not eating, not sleeping, and most significant failure of individual to take care of their teeth.

So if you are prescribed dexedrine (or any medication for that matter) and do not eat, sleep, or brush your teeth for a couple years straight, there's a good chance you could develop "methmouth"

Sorry to be sarcastic, but i'm just in one of those moods. And seriously don't quit taking your meds b/c your are worried you may loose your teeth.

just reread your op and i'll end my post with "methmouth" would fall more in the side effect category of failure to brush one's teeth or practice any dental hygeine for many months to years.

"Methmouth" is not a side effect of stimulants.

justcallmedorie
09-26-08, 06:22 AM
You're kidding right?

Meth mouth is a catch phrase used by the media in the war on drugs and specifically methamphetamine.

"methmouth" occurs as a result of poor dental hygeine/ no dental hygeine, not eating, not sleeping, and most significant failure of individual to take care of their teeth.

So if you are prescribed dexedrine (or any medication for that matter) and do not eat, sleep, or brush your teeth for a couple years straight, there's a good chance you could develop "methmouth"

Sorry to be sarcastic, but i'm just in one of those moods. And seriously don't quit taking your meds b/c your are worried you may loose your teeth.

just reread your op and i'll end my post with "methmouth" would fall more in the side effect category of failure to brush one's teeth or practice any dental hygeine for many months to years.

"Methmouth" is not a side effect of stimulants.

Yeah, I'm on dex, drink over 64 oz of non-caffeinated, non-alcoholic beverages a day, floss and brush, and I'm not having any problems. Ramp up your liquid intake and your dental hygiene and you should be fine.

akko
09-26-08, 11:01 AM
Well, if you're not brushing your teeth and eating a bunch of sugar, you'll get problems weather you're on dex or not, I would think. I think that the only effect that you could argue is a direct result of amphetamines is a dryer mouth, which can precipitate tooth decay. I'm not sure how people combat that, but maybe by chewing sugar-free gum and drinking more water throughout the day.

johnnyx
09-26-08, 03:43 PM
nope no meth mouth for me I brush everyday. I also don't have a craving for anything while on Dexadrine, so I can eat that salad or fruit that I have been avoided because I no longer crave that Big Mac with Cheese.

QueensU_girl
09-26-08, 03:50 PM
All medications that cause dry mouth have this problem.

(You should see the teeth of LT former 'state' mental hospital patients on some mental health teams I was on as a health care student. Heart breaking.)

Basic point: Dry mouth --> creates more plaque/bacteria.

There are things that can be done to reduce 'dry mouth'. (e.g. eat apples, brush, use Biotene, etc. Talk to your Dentist and Pharmacist.)

mystery
09-26-08, 04:21 PM
I've noticed that since I started dexedrine (and the methylphenidate before) my craving for sweets has tripled and I drink 4-5 sodas a day. I don't brush my teeth at night now and I wake up with bleeding gums. Througout the day I can feel my mouth drying up and just..feeling gross. According to web sites that describe meth mouth, that's how it starts.

So, anyone on dexedrine have problems? I can tell I'm starting already, so I think I'm done forever with dexedrine.

I haven't experienced problems like this. The only thing is that when I crash off dex sometimes at night, I have a hard time getting myself to brush before going to bed. It's helpful to try and work on habits. Like don't think about it, and just brush your teeth. At first it'll be a real pain, but then you'll just do it automatically. And try and cut down on the sodas slowly until you are not drinking any of them anymore.

tree oh tree
09-26-08, 04:30 PM
It's also bruxism that leads to 'meth mouth', on high doses of stimulants you will grind your teeth alot. Generally on ritalin, at the right dose it doesn't happen that often to me.

Captain Sanity
09-26-08, 05:22 PM
Don't listen to any of this nonsense in here. There's nothing about meth that makes people stop brushing their teeth or drink sugar drinks.

It's actually scurvy caused by vitamin C deficiency that causes meth mouth. Amphetamines use up vitamin C, and at the doses people addicted to meth use, vitamin C virtually disappears from your system.

It amazes me that doctors don't educate/warn their patients (victims?) a bit more about effects like this, but it's important to make sure you get enough vitamin C and magnesium while you are on amphetamines.

Just don't take the vitamin C at the same time as the meds or its acidity will make it less effective.

justcallmedorie
09-26-08, 05:30 PM
Don't listen to any of this nonsense in here. There's nothing about meth that makes people stop brushing their teeth or drink sugar drinks.

It's actually scurvy caused by vitamin C deficiency that causes meth mouth. Amphetamines use up vitamin C, and at the doses people addicted to meth use, vitamin C virtually disappears from your system.

It amazes me that doctors don't educate/warn their patients (victims?) a bit more about effects like this, but it's important to make sure you get enough vitamin C and magnesium while you are on amphetamines.

Just don't take the vitamin C at the same time as the meds or its acidity will make it less effective.

Just out of idle curiosity, what would an optimum amount of C & Mag be? I take in upwards of 2600 of C and 1000 mag per day. Plus what I get in foods...

tree oh tree
09-26-08, 05:45 PM
Bruxism, isn't nonsense! Honestly I have a read who used to take loadsa MDMA and he's worn at least a quarter of one of his front teeth out!!! Also, when I used to drink alcohol on my methylphenidate and if I got angry my teeth would scrape together wearing them down!!! Bruxism is tooth grinding/ jaw clenching.
In fact recently I had this blister in my mouth because I keep biting the side of my mouth when sleeping.
When on an amphetamine and highly focused I wrote for a couple of hours (non prescription) and then got up and my mouth had loadsa blood init from where I had clenched my teeth on the side it led to lots of blood, it was weird.

TygerSan
09-26-08, 06:06 PM
It's also bruxism that leads to 'meth mouth', on high doses of stimulants you will grind your teeth alot. Generally on ritalin, at the right dose it doesn't happen that often to me.This is something to note: it may not happen to everyone, but it did to me. On Adderall (not a very high dose: 30 mg XR) I started grinding my teeth hard-core at night, and clenching my jaw during the day.

The result: my teeth hurt and my gums bled more. My dentist suggested a mouthguard for nighttime, but I decided to stop taking the med instead.

jmchamp
09-26-08, 06:43 PM
My mom is on some prescribed meds (not for ADD, although I think she might have it) and she grinds her teeth really bad while she sleeps and has to wear a mouthguard.

Veggymel
09-26-08, 06:47 PM
I have a bite guard from my dentist also.....i grind so bad that I ended up breaking the dental appliance even. They are really pricey...

Captain Sanity
09-26-08, 08:04 PM
Bruxism, isn't nonsense! Honestly I have a read who used to take loadsa MDMA and he's worn at least a quarter of one of his front teeth out!!! Also, when I used to drink alcohol on my methylphenidate and if I got angry my teeth would scrape together wearing them down!!! Bruxism is tooth grinding/ jaw clenching.
In fact recently I had this blister in my mouth because I keep biting the side of my mouth when sleeping.
When on an amphetamine and highly focused I wrote for a couple of hours (non prescription) and then got up and my mouth had loadsa blood init from where I had clenched my teeth on the side it led to lots of blood, it was weird.

Sorry, my post came off a bit harsh. Bruxism can happen with amphetamines, but it's not a serious problem for most people. I think it's around 5%-10% who experience it.

Pretty much every regular, heavy meth user will get scurvy, though. Which leads to horrible teeth and sores among a myriad of other problems.


...

As for the doses, I really am not sure what's optimal and I don't think there is a definitive answer because it depends on your metabolism. Most people don't get meth mouth on therapeutic doses of amphetamines because of the much loser doses, but supplementing with that and with magnesium is a smart idea. I try to get 800 mg of magnesium and a gram of C every day, and I take potassium chloride as well.

justcallmedorie
09-26-08, 08:09 PM
As for the doses, I really am not sure what's optimal and I don't think there is a definitive answer because it depends on your metabolism. Most people don't get meth mouth on therapeutic doses of amphetamines because of the much loser doses, but supplementing with that and with magnesium is a smart idea. I try to get 800 mg of magnesium and a gram of C every day, and I take potassium chloride as well.

Ok, so 2600 mg of C and 1000 of mag are good. Stupid question, is potassium chloride the same as "potassium"? If so, how much of that might be good...sorry, don't mean to be quite so inquisitive, this is the first I've known about the supps being so necessary, glad I'm covered on the first 2. :p

mw26
09-26-08, 08:23 PM
A response for LVG:

At theraputic doses, which we are all on "meth mouth" will not occur. Also, meth is a street drug which is synthetic and has alot of other harmful chemicals which are not in ADD medications.
The bleeding gums which you are describing come from an infection which is either generalized or localized within your mouth. Due to this infection, the gingival tissue will also become inflammed and in turn bleed when you brush and floss. This lowgrade infection is most likely due to plaque that sits along the gumline in the sulcus where the teeth and gum tissue meet. Your brushing methods are probably wrong. Brush into the gumline on a 30-degree angle so that the plaque is brushed away. Brush 2-3 times a day, especially before you go to bed as all the food debris and residual plaque will be eliminated. If you have proper hygiene for about a week to 10 days, the inflammation and bleeding should subside or all together be eliminated.
Since one of the drugs side-effects is dry mouth (xerostomia) use an alcohol free rinse such as crests pro-health rinse. Alcoholic rinses dry the tissues out and make the problem worse. Also biotene or oasis mouth rinses are designed to hydrate the tissues. Drink plenty of water as well. I hear that you should consume at least as many ounces as your body weight i.e. if you weight 100 lbs, try to consume 100 ounces of water.
You may want to see your dentist or hygientist at least every six months if not sooner.
I do not think you have anything to worry about with dex causing "meth mouth" as you are worried. Hope any of this helps you. Good luck!
p.s.- The bruxing will not cause tissue to bleed. It will however, cause gingival recession and is harmful to teeth in general.

Captain Sanity
09-26-08, 08:23 PM
Ok, so 2600 mg of C and 1000 of mag are good. Stupid question, is potassium chloride the same as "potassium"? If so, how much of that might be good...sorry, don't mean to be quite so inquisitive, this is the first I've known about the supps being so necessary, glad I'm covered on the first 2. :p

Yeah, it's just a potassium source, and don't worry, I don't mind.

I think that your body needs something like 2900mg per day, but supplementing tot hat level is dangerous. I only take 800mg a day.

simpleblue
09-26-08, 09:31 PM
My medication helps to remind me to brush and gives me the motivation to floss. A few weeks after taking dexedrine my teeth and gums looked healthy.

tree oh tree
09-27-08, 05:51 AM
yeah i'm more motivarted tolook after myself.

marcykid
10-20-08, 07:17 PM
What a rediculous post. It's like saying "I smoke 16 packs of cigarettes a day, I started eating apples last month and now I've got lung cancer. Did you know apples cause cancer?..." ***BONK!***

ozchris
10-20-08, 08:54 PM
You're kidding right?

Meth mouth is a catch phrase used by the media in the war on drugs and specifically methamphetamine.

"methmouth" occurs as a result of poor dental hygeine/ no dental hygeine, not eating, not sleeping, and most significant failure of individual to take care of their teeth.

So if you are prescribed dexedrine (or any medication for that matter) and do not eat, sleep, or brush your teeth for a couple years straight, there's a good chance you could develop "methmouth"

Sorry to be sarcastic, but i'm just in one of those moods. And seriously don't quit taking your meds b/c your are worried you may loose your teeth.

just reread your op and i'll end my post with "methmouth" would fall more in the side effect category of failure to brush one's teeth or practice any dental hygeine for many months to years.

"Methmouth" is not a side effect of stimulants.

I always thought 'meth mouth' was caused by reduced saliva in the mouth. I've known of some meth users that brush teeth, floss etc. and they still seem to have bad teeth.

Your theory makes more sense though. I can't think of how having a reduced flow of saliva (dry mouth) would cause more/increased decay.

I'm sure the unhealthy diet of someone on meth would cause problems with tooth decay.

Imnapl
10-20-08, 10:28 PM
I can't think of how having a reduced flow of saliva (dry mouth) would cause more/increased decay.Dry mouth syndrome (http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.Nsf/pages/Dry_mouth_syndrome?OpenDocument):

About one in every four Australians has dry mouth syndrome, which is when there is not enough saliva (spit) in the mouth. A dry mouth is a symptom of an underlying problem, rather than a disease in itself.

Various factors can cause a persistently dry mouth, including prescription medications, medical treatments and certain autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren’s syndrome. Treatment includes products that help to moisten the mouth. Dry mouth syndrome is also called xerostomia.

Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of dry mouth may include:


Thick, syrupy saliva
Rough, dry tongue
The tongue tending to stick against the roof of the mouth
Problems with chewing or swallowing (particularly dry foods such as biscuits)
Bad breath
Mouth ulcers
Dry and cracked lips
Susceptibility to oral thrush infections
High rate of tooth decay.


The protective role of saliva
A dry mouth significantly increases the risk of tooth decay. This is because saliva:

Reduces the number of caries (decay-causing) bacteria
Has anti-fungal properties
Helps to destroy viruses
Cancels out decay-causing mouth acids
Contains phosphorus and calcium. These substances are vital to the ongoing process of re-mineralisation, which is the rebuilding of tooth enamel (the hard surface layer that protects the tooth)
Moistens food, which enables comfortable swallowing
Helps with the formation of particular sounds in speech
Boosts sensation inside the mouth and allows, for example, the experience of pain, food texture and taste.

ADXP
12-02-08, 02:27 PM
Dry mouth syndrome (http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.Nsf/pages/Dry_mouth_syndrome?OpenDocument):

About one in every four Australians has dry mouth syndrome, which is when there is not enough saliva (spit) in the mouth. A dry mouth is a symptom of an underlying problem, rather than a disease in itself.

Various factors can cause a persistently dry mouth, including prescription medications, medical treatments and certain autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren’s syndrome. Treatment includes products that help to moisten the mouth. Dry mouth syndrome is also called xerostomia.

Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of dry mouth may include:


Thick, syrupy saliva
Rough, dry tongue
The tongue tending to stick against the roof of the mouth
Problems with chewing or swallowing (particularly dry foods such as biscuits)
Bad breath
Mouth ulcers
Dry and cracked lips
Susceptibility to oral thrush infections
High rate of tooth decay.

The protective role of saliva

A dry mouth significantly increases the risk of tooth decay. This is because saliva:

Reduces the number of caries (decay-causing) bacteria
Has anti-fungal properties
Helps to destroy viruses
Cancels out decay-causing mouth acids
Contains phosphorus and calcium. These substances are vital to the ongoing process of re-mineralisation, which is the rebuilding of tooth enamel (the hard surface layer that protects the tooth)
Moistens food, which enables comfortable swallowing
Helps with the formation of particular sounds in speech
Boosts sensation inside the mouth and allows, for example, the experience of pain, food texture and taste.


The American Dental Association mentioned xerostomia. And all I need to know. Meth is Meth. Prescribed or not. The main function of the saliva is the most significant factor that plays a role in the rapid decay. Dex /Adderall are acidic & bacteria thrives under this environment, making our teeth more suscetiptible to decay.

I lost all my upper teeth in about a year ,not even that. I was not aware of this side effects. Meth also attack our teeth from inside out. It goes into our bloodstream via blood supply, acids is distributed all over our body,it shows first in our mouth becoz the mouth is visible among other organs.

I also agree that the acidic nature of meth inhibits the crystallization of Calcium hydroxyapatite crystals a nutients that keeps our bones ,hair ,nails & teeth healthy. And Meth is so acidic that causes this problems.

But I have to choose between two evils : my teeth or my brain?

cryscoearl
02-26-09, 06:07 PM
I have been on adderall for about 2 yrs. I am a 33 yr old woman who takes care of herself as well as her kids!~ And I can tell you now, Adderall or even a side effect of Adderall does lead to tooth decay. From what I have read lately, it looks as if the dry mouth and jaw clenching are the 2 major contributors. I have some minimal amount of decay and I brush, floss and have my teeth cleaned on a regular basis. There is no reason whatsoever that I should have this issue, other than the fact that yes, Adderall does make my jaw clench and gives me dry mouth....to which I have always combatted w/ drinking lots of water- so why do I have decay? I am at a loss, so is my dentist. I use Biotene and that may be why the decay has not really gotten worse in the last 4 months. I just dont know. I just want to make it stop and go away........:o

Sandy4957
02-26-09, 06:33 PM
Certain short-acting stimulants cause my lips to burn, chap, and crack at the corners. I have good oral hygiene and stay reasonably well-hydrated. No amount of lip balm, etc. cured the chapping or cracks. Finally, I noticed that it seemed to burn the most after eating things like bread or fruit, or drinking wine, and it occurred to me that it might be candida. So I tried rubbing the outsides of my lips with an anti-fungal cream and that did it.

I only made the connection with the stimulants after I was off of them for a month or so, then took them for a week or so, again. I take them at the prescribed dosages.

I asked my dentist about this and he theorized that amphetamines acidify mucus membranes, so it is possible that your mouth flora gets a little out of balance when you take them. I don't have this problem with Ritalin or any of the long-acting stimulants.

Weird, huh?

bilbogates98
02-26-09, 07:53 PM
This is something to note: it may not happen to everyone, but it did to me. On Adderall (not a very high dose: 30 mg XR) I started grinding my teeth hard-core at night, and clenching my jaw during the day.

The result: my teeth hurt and my gums bled more. My dentist suggested a mouthguard for nighttime, but I decided to stop taking the med instead.

This reminds me.

During the last couple years I was on my adhd meds, I developed a really bad habit of grinding down my teeth at night. My dentist told me its usually because of anixety (btw I was on anti anxiety meds at the time (either welbutrin or zoloft)). I also was having a bad habit of using my tungue to constantly rub away at a few specific teeth, and i notice now that those teeth are now dull, instead of sharp like they used to be. The nasty habit I deveoped of rubbing them down with my tungue over a couple years wore down from the constant rubbing.

So I got a mouth guard. It cost my parents alot of money, but i didn't even use it for more than a week while i was sleeping.

The tungue rubbing and grinding persisted for a while after I stopped taking adhd meds, but it eventually went away.

dacres
02-28-09, 04:01 AM
Don't listen to any of this nonsense in here. There's nothing about meth that makes people stop brushing their teeth or drink sugar drinks.

It's actually scurvy caused by vitamin C deficiency that causes meth mouth.

No, there's no way that's correct.
Meth mouth is caused by a double-whammy of dry mouth (dehydration) and jaw clenching. Trust me. I used to do ecstasy (methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) and it makes your jaw clench like crazy — that's why you see people with pacifiers at raves. (I personally preferred chewing gum...) Methamphetamine and amphetamine will do the same thing in higher abusive doses (or even medical doses). [MDMA's dehydration is much more extreme, but meth and amph hit hard too.]
Add to that that all the things ending with "amphetamine" can make you crave high calorie things like sodas and candy. Personally, even with Adderall, I am obsessed with Reese's Cups and soda. Though it's fine for me, though; I brush my teeth 2 - 3 times a day and weigh 125lbs. And I drink Coke Zero or Diet Dr. Pepper instead of full-calorie, so there's no sugar. This doesn't excuse you from brushing though, cola has a pH of 2, so brush that acid out!

So be sure, if you notice worsening teeth, to try to chew gum most of the day (sugarless!!) and to brush and floss every morning and every night. Also, biotene is a mouthwash my piercer gave me for my lip piercing, and I learned quickly that it is an excellent treatment for dry mouth. So I would recommend that.

Yes, Vitamin C is important but it is certainly not the culprit with meth mouth.

Imnapl
02-28-09, 04:36 PM
I ground my teeth and had mouth guards decades before I started taking ADHD medication.

distractakon
02-28-09, 07:36 PM
Hmmm meth mouth?

I use to grind my teeth hard out in my sleep for the first few hours BEFORE I started Dex... I take dex before I sleep and I don't grind anymore? So for me it's been good.

I suspect that nearly ALL medications interfere with mineral/vitamin absorbtion/metabolism-- so that overtime your teeth are simply less strong and more prone to decay. High blood sugar for instance is known to pull calcium from the bones over time, hence leading to proneness to decay, in addition to the ph balance in your mouth being changed.

If you don't believe me about minerals and teeth, look at the teeth of children who live in artificially flurodated areas: dental flurosis anyone? The effect is dramatic.

Always make sure you have enough: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin E, proline, glycine and gelatin; all of these things play a role in bone/teeth formation.

visit www.westonaprice.org (http://www.westonaprice.org) or read Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon; I found it the most useful, insightful, researched based book on nutrition around.

dacres
02-28-09, 09:55 PM
Yes, bruxism can be a problem with people who are not using stimulants.

But the amphetamine family can and does cause clenching and grinding in people who normally do not have these problems.

Dental consensus is in the reasons I described above, and supported by the American Dental Association. The American Dental Association does not recognize vitamin deficiencies as a cause.

Source (http://www.ada.org/prof/resources/topics/methmouth.asp), source (http://news.bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-3/Use--as-well-as-meth-mouth--on-the-rise-2765-1/), and source. (http://209.85.173.132/search?q=cache:39YGrax1tmkJ:www.mamasite.net/speaker_docs/medical_impact.pdf+%22meth+mouth%22+vitamin+defici ency&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=6&gl=us)

Plus I have first-hand experience. Don't doubt me, son!