View Full Version : What is cognitive behavorial therapy?


Stuke20
11-03-08, 02:38 AM
I about to get in to one. What am i going to expect. and uh basically i don't know a damn thing about, so someone fill me in.

cbtish
11-03-08, 06:21 AM
You do not need to know anything beforehand.

CBT only works well if you have a good relationship with the therapist. So that's the first thing to expect. In the first session, nothing much might happen except that you and the therapist get to know each other.

After that, there are two types of CBT. In real CBT the focus is on your thought processes. You'll spend a lot of time discussing how you think about things. You might try some simple experiments to find out more about how you really think.

Some therapists are really just behavioural. They say they do CBT, but really they don't do the cognitive part. If you have one of these therapists, you'll focus on how you behave, and you'll work on discovering ways to change your behaviour directly.

CBT is good for anxiety and depression -- the kind of things you described in your first post here -- and it can treat a lot of other problems too. In my opinion, real CBT (the type that deals with thinking) is better than the other type.

x.MissSammie.x
11-04-08, 08:05 AM
Im currently having cognitive behavorial therapy for my anxiety.

I agree that it only works well if you have a good relationship with the therapist..my last one i didnt really like, so i just didnt really bother with it or the homework she gave me...I didnt see the point.

But now i have a new one and i like herrrr :D ive just had the 3rd session with her but im really exicted (and scared) finally might be able to get 'better'


Good luck :)

mctavish23
11-06-08, 11:38 PM
CBT has been around since roughly he 1980's.

Simply put, CBT is based on the premise that


"How you think affects the way you feel."


There's obviously a lot more to it, as there's a carry over with other therapies like Rational Behavior Therapy,etc.


There's some really excellent books on this and I appreciate your bringing it up.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Darkangel001
12-28-08, 06:38 PM
I think the other posters pretty much covered this- but yeah- basically your therapist would talk through some of the issue you have and how this is affecting the way you are feeling and behaving at the time.

By reworking your thought processes and challenges, they hope to bring a greater understanding in the way you think- but when you come across a similar situation again- so that you can deal with it in a more positive and pro-active manner-

I am just speaking from personal experience- I had it to deal with anxiety and the way I felt about my parents- which at the time was according to my shrink- very negative for me because I idealized them too much in my mind and despite everything they did to me, it sort of screwed me up somehow- anyhoo, from personal experience again, experience emotions to ran high- either crying or feeling really angry-

I really did not like my therapist at the beginning as well- but as I worked through her more- I sort of started to realise that she may have a point.

Hope this helped

andyr
02-19-09, 02:58 PM
I have ADD/OCPD, and my company arranged an 'intake' and 5 sessions of cognitive therapy to help me. We had the intake today, and talked a bit about my history and problems. I felt quite relaxed and cheerful going in, and all the way through, up to the end, where she gave me an idea what she will put in the report to my company. Summary: complicated mix of several problems, getting worse, hard to fix, slow to fix, needs a much more specialised therapist, outcome uncertain. That dampened my spirits a little, coming home.

geogator
04-13-09, 10:54 PM
By reworking your thought processes and challenges, they hope to bring a greater understanding in the way you think- but when you come across a similar situation again- so that you can deal with it in a more positive and pro-active manner

This is pretty much what my therapist is trying to do with me as well. (I was diagnosed in late February w/ Adult ADHD (combined), Depression & Anxiety.) The therapist has been really concentrating on the depression & anxiety angles (along with anger management) and attempting to help me reverse my negative thinking patterns and cope with bad or stressful events of everyday life. The tough part she says (& she's correct) is that since I've been thinking in one pattern (primarily negative) for most of my life, it is impossible to just "change" it like a light switch. Rather, it will be a slow process of making some forward progress, then having some setbacks, followed by more forward progress and more setbacks (but eventually fewer of them), so that the overall progression is towards positive change. I was doing really well (or so I thought) for the past couple of weeks, until I had to spend some time out of town with my extended family this weekend & came unglued several times & was pretty grouchy for a few days. Obviously, this must be one of those "setbacks" which really bummed me out initially. However, today I'm thinking to myself "well, at least I'll have some good stuff to talk to my therapist about this week & hopefully she'll be able to help me pick myself up, dust off & get back on track!".:) I guess everyone is right when they say this is going to be real WORK & not just a "quick fix" type of thing that is over in a matter of weeks or months. (sigh) However, I really like my therapist & we've had some really good sessions thus far, so I'm going to try & stay positive in the face of these setbacks.

Guess I need to go look in the mirror & tell that to myself out loud for few minutes too, as it is supposed to help.;)