View Full Version : Diagnosing Childhood Bipolar


MGDAD
11-19-08, 01:12 PM
I came across this article, when researching childhood psychiatric services. One of the authors is the chair of the bipolar clinic for children at Stanford. Fortunately this entire article is free on Pubmed. Note that it has a long list of co-authors from respected universities. Maybe this should even be a sticky for this forum category.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=15841189

Dizfriz
11-19-08, 02:52 PM
I came across this article, when researching childhood psychiatric services. One of the authors is the chair of the bipolar clinic for children at Stanford. Fortunately this entire article is free on Pubmed. Note that it has a long list of co-authors from respected universities. Maybe this should even be a sticky for this forum category.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=15841189

This was a good article. Thanks for posting the link.

It covered some subjects of interest to me. It demonstrated how hard it is to correctly diagnose adults much less children. The symptoms in children can also stem from other issues as the article indicated and we do not have a real good handle on which symptoms of Bipolar in young children will accurately predict Bipolar in adults. Makes it tricky.

"In general, the symptoms of ADHD and conduct disorder resemble the symptoms of these disorders in patients who do not develop bipolar disorder."

"The identification of early-onset bipolar disorder is a controversial diagnostic challenge. Confusion has resulted from attempts to apply adult-derived diagnostic criteria to children without allowance for developmental differences and from use of excessively inclusive signs, such as hyperactivity and irritability, rather than specific symptoms of mania, leading to overdiagnosis. The extent to which children with manic episodes go on to develop bipolar disorder as adults is not established."

Also of interest, it refers to a subject on which I have posted many times, that there are no tests that can accurately diagnose disorders such as ADHD an Pediatric Bipolar

"There are currently no biochemical or other objective tests that are practical for making the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Measures such as those described in this article can potentially enhance clinical efficiency. Ultimately, there is no substitute for alert and accurate clinical diagnosis."

At least for now, it is a judgment call on the part of the clinician. The more training and experience you have the better you become at recognizing the patterns of behavior and history.

When a parent is looking at a possible diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar, it is my opinion that it needs to come from a source with a lot of well trained experience with this. This is why I so often refer to clinics connected with major hospitals and universities.

MGDAD. Good information. Again thanks for posting it.

Dizfriz

MGDAD
11-19-08, 03:05 PM
Here is a recent article about a longitudinal study for diagnosing bipolar in children and determining if it correlates to adult bipolar. 8 Year follow up study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18838629?ordinalpos=7&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

It seems that this shows that there is some validity in diagnosing pediatric bipolar and its relevance in predicting adult bipolar.

Diz, are you following me?

Dizfriz
11-19-08, 06:29 PM
Here is a recent article about a longitudinal study for diagnosing bipolar in children and determining if it correlates to adult bipolar. 8 Year follow up study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18838629?ordinalpos=7&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

It seems that this shows that there is some validity in diagnosing pediatric bipolar and its relevance in predicting adult bipolar.

Diz, are you following me?

I am generally familiar with some of this type of research. I am more than well aware of the lack of good information predicting which childhood symptoms will accurately predict adult Bipolar. I applaud any work done to help correct this.

Please understand that my primary interest is in kids age nine down to about age two. I keep up with other age groups and disabilities in a general way so I know, more or less, what is going on the field. There is not time to become knowledgeable in all aspects of all fields. To be effective, I pick what I feel will do me the most good and work on that enough to get done what I need. Please do not consider me an expert on the research because I am not.

My primary area was in helping children and their parents deal with these disorders. My research interests were connected directly that which would help me do this.

Alas, I cannot give you a good conversation on areas outside my primary areas of expertise. I wish I could but I simply do not have that much range.

This is good information however and I do think being able to deal with pediatric Bipolar is a *very* important concern. Do keep posting these articles as you find them as they are interesting and useful.

It was not too many years ago that it was felt that there was no such thing as pediatric Bipolar. It was felt that Bipolar only started in mid to late adolescence. Now we know better but we still have a long way to go to get a handle on Bipolar especially at very young ages.

As an aside, you present as very interested in the field and seem to enjoy doing the research. I might suggest that you consider the possibility someday of getting more training even to the point of becoming a professional. I suspect you would be good at it.

Yours,

Dizfriz