View Full Version : Why do people say we *don't* have the right to different meds?


simonekf
01-10-09, 05:52 AM
My psychiatrist recently changed his practice, and now he can only see students. I have to find a new doctor, and the few he recommended are all full.

People keep saying to a questioner below, that we don't have the right to try different meds.

Is that the way doctors are going to act?

Because, if so, I am going to be ****ed. I have a PhD in the sciences, and my doctor and I set up trials of different drugs (adderall, dexedrine, concerta, etc.) over time. He didn't have me stop when one drug started working. We did trials of different ones at different dosages and then iterated back toward the one that seemed the best. How can you tell what's best if you stop at one drug?

I did not understand the lazy asinine mentality of my previous doctor before him who seemed to think if something made me feel a bit better, then we were done.

I have not tried desoxyn and might be interested in trying it - since when we did our experiments, it wasn't really talked about or used much for ADHD.

But basically right now, I am quite concerned that I am going to get some doctor who thinks he knows more about my condition than I do. I've spent 15 years on this, and he'll spend 30 minutes with me.

The general answers below to the person asking about medicine choices were: your doctor knows more than you do.

I dont' believe this to be the case, although I realize I have to give the doctor that impression or he/she will be less helfpul. But honestly, I've read as much scientific literature on ADHD as most doctors have (unless they only treat ADHD and that's not likely around here). So now I am quite concerned that when I walk in and ask for what I take right now, they might not even agree to give me that. I am not planning ot mention desoxyn for at least 6 months, so that the doctor will know that I am not craving some meth high.

Sigh. Finding a psychiatrist around here is VERY hard. They are all often booked up.

But I am surprised (I just found this board) that people give the impression that we are supposed to assume the doctors know more than we do. In my experience, it's not that likely honesty.

My last psychiatrist was great. He listened, he was very smart, and very open-minded. My previous psychiatrist (for ADHD) was a lazy moron who just wanted money to write prescriptions. My doctor before that (we didn't figure out I had ADHD, and he treated me for depression) was nice, but honestly, just not that smart.

Sigh. Any suggestions on how to tell whether a doctor is a good fit or open-minded quickly?

Thanks!

Contrapunctus
01-11-09, 09:47 PM
My physician will openly admit to me that he knows less about ADHD/drug pharmacology...

However, knowing that I recently started medical school probably makes him feel less uncomfortable about this...

Interestingly, it was my physician who suggested the Desoxyn, as I had never considered the option.

If you suffer from ADHD-PI, you may actually find d-amph to be superior to methamphetamine, given the higher affinity for NE release. Still, the side effect profile is very low, so it could certainly be worth trying. Keep in mind that d-meth is less stimulating than d-amph, as this is something that many people seem not to be aware of...

Though this is not politically correct, I would avoid a female physician if you are attempting to get a Desoxyn script. I would also avoid younger male physicians.

The physician most likely to prescribe desoxyn would be an male in their 50-60's, who is highly intelligent/confident in their practice of medicine, and who gets paid quite well or doesn't take crappy insurance (or who doesn't take insurance at all!).

ecu20
01-29-09, 04:34 AM
Though this is not politically correct, I would avoid a female physician if you are attempting to get a Desoxyn script. I would also avoid younger male physicians.

The physician most likely to prescribe desoxyn would be an male in their 50-60's, who is highly intelligent/confident in their practice of medicine, and who gets paid quite well or doesn't take crappy insurance (or who doesn't take insurance at all!).

My doc fits right in that description perfectly. He said:

"these psychoactive stimulants work differently in each one of us. Some of my patients rant and rave about how good ritalin is, some about adderall, some about dexedrine, some even about desoxyn. None of my patients whatsoever rant and rave about how good strattera is :D. So I don't even bother with the 2-3 week trial-wait-for-it-to-kick-in-bull*$h1T!:D with new patients unless they really really want to try it.

Since we are largely unaware about exactly how these stimulants work in the brain, I can't perfectly understand or experience how you feel on each one, so I have to trust that you will be honest with me and say x drug or y drug helped control my symptoms best."

I feel i can talk pharmacology with him, and discuss the problems/suggestions with drugs/dosages WITHOUT being labeled as a drug seeker/addict. It seems as though the best doctors i've been to are the ones who don't immediately shut out useful medications just because someone appears very knowledgeable about a particular drug and pharmacology in general.

Jonas1H
03-17-09, 08:26 PM
other people never heared about "Desoxyn" "Serotonin5HTreceptors" "ephedrine" or "Reuptake inhibitiors". These words have scientific sounds, whats chemically going around is not a quest
other people dont understand our quest to get chemicals with a reputation of VX Nerve Agent Gas because they don't understand the mechanisms (meth)amphetamine is triggering inside neural networks.


:)