View Full Version : What is your autism quotient?


AbsentMindProf
02-19-09, 10:59 AM
I have a son with Asperger syndrome. About 70% of people with this disorder independently meet the diagnostic criteria for ADHD and my son is no exception. His autistic traits are obvious to someone with the right specialized training but, to many people, he just seems "hyper, inattentive, and a little quirky". Because Asperger syndrome is at the mild end of the autism spectrum, it is often missed. Many people with AS were diagnosed as adults.

This leads me to think that there may be some people on this board that actually have comorbid ADHD and a mild autism spectrum disorder. There is an informal, online screening test for this for those that may be interested. It was developed by a psychologist with a great deal of experience in ASD.

Here's the test. (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html) I got 16. Supposedly, a really high score may indicate the possibility that the person may be on the autism spectrum.

Just throwing that out there for anyone that might be interested.

cwatca
02-19-09, 11:55 AM
I got a 34...:eek:

novagal
02-19-09, 12:12 PM
I kept getting lost and having to scroll up to the top because I couldn't remember which side was "agree" and which side was "disagree" :confused: and then my brain hurt a little bit. I didn't finish. I'm just going to delude myself into believing I finshed and my score was low.....

roseblood
02-19-09, 12:23 PM
I had to fill out this questionnaire before my ADHD assessment yesterday. Didn't know how it was scored though. According to that website I score 21. My mum had to answer the same questions about me. They're taking much more in to account than that questionnaire (which they haven't analysed yet) before deciding whether I should see the adult autism specialist for assessment as well though, so they can't see it as perfect and I wouldn't worry about it. :)

The psychiatrist seemed interested that my initial language development and interest in other children was slightly delayed and I don't have a typically active social life so I think that's mainly what made him suspect it. My mum also mentioned that I rock backwards and forwards a lot (that really bugs her) and he might associate that more with autism. Even then it's not easy to diagnose because there are other possible explanations for most of it and I don't have certain major traits, like trouble with eye contact or reading body language. And 21 doesn't seem high to me.

*Sigh* I don't know. Surely it would be easier to decide if they tried putting me on stimulants to see which things changed but they're not allowed to recommend treatment until they've made a firm diagnosis, and they're not diagnosing anything until I've seen every specialist who might be relevant, it seems.

Logic
02-19-09, 12:53 PM
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I have been told that I'm in one of the highest percentiles for Autistic tendencies/traits by an educational psychologist, but have not been diagnosed with anything other than ADHD and Dyslexia.
My current supervision psychologist reported that after reading reports on my history that I was probably ODD as a kid also, but that was never looked into.
He's currently working on convincing me that this 'untreated ODD' has matured and formed into a "very undesireable Conduct Disorder" (to quote him) owing to my eccentric and inappropriate behaviours (for my age - I'm 25).
Perhaps I dont have some sort of CD after all, maybe I'm just more on the spectrum than originally thought? Or perhaps not...who knows.

Definitely need to have a talk with him I feel.

Logic

michele223
02-19-09, 01:25 PM
My son got a 33 with me guessing on some of them for him. He is 6. I have been trying to ask the psychologist or psychiatrist if there is a possibility he is aspergers but they won't give me a definitive answer. Is it a hard theng to dignose? He is in the gray area with ADHD, Obsessions, anxiety, and tics and immune issues. It would make the school system work so much better for him to get the diagnosis. Now they see him as looking fine and refuse accomodations. He also has dygrahia and viual motor issues. Very frustrating. The ADHD stimulants have not worked well because he has many emotional meltdowns and can't sleep well.

AbsentMindProf
02-19-09, 01:40 PM
My son got a 33 with me guessing on some of them for him. He is 6. I have been trying to ask the psychologist or psychiatrist if there is a possibility he is aspergers but they won't give me a definitive answer. Is it a hard theng to dignose?

I don't think it's a particularly hard thing to diagnose for someone with the right specialized training and practical clinical experience. I think it does need to be someone with the right training, though. None of my son's pediatricians recognized it.

It's worth pursuing a clear answer to the question, though. My son gets a lot of services through his school district that would likely be difficult to get with an ADHD diagnosis.

The Trooper
02-19-09, 02:09 PM
i got 29, not a good sign i dont think hehe

ADHDTigger
02-19-09, 02:34 PM
Hmm. A 32. Interesting. But not a particularly high score, either.

Zerbinetta
02-19-09, 03:24 PM
I think I had to fill out a Dutch translation of this test the other day, as part of a follow-up conducted by the children's psychiatry department that examined me back when I was 13. And misdiagnosed me, as I made sure to point out this time, under "Comments."

Anyway, my current AQ appears to be 27. My favourite number, so yay.

sarek
02-19-09, 03:35 PM
I scored 34. Not unsurprising. But several questions could easily have gone both ways.

speedo
02-19-09, 07:30 PM
I scored 30. I was expecting to score lower. The problem with this quiz is that it is easy to bias the answer you give. I know what the questions mean and I could easily make it score neurotypical or autistic by picking my answer. I think it really needs to have a double blind so that it is more objective.

I guess if you use the quiz along with other measurements that it is still useful.

Me :D

ADHDKylee
02-19-09, 07:50 PM
I got 33.. What does that mean?

planetdave
02-19-09, 08:04 PM
29 for me. It feels about right - I have some autistic tendencies but am nothing like my Aspergers friends. Their world is much more structured.

samtux
02-19-09, 08:18 PM
25 seems quite low around here but im not sure how high it is generally ??

sam

LostInTheStars
02-19-09, 08:32 PM
I scored a 26

Here is something it said at the top of the page about scores...

In the first major trial using the test, the average score in the control group was 16.4.

Eighty percent of those diagnosed with autism or a related disorder scored 32 or higher.

The test is not a means for making a diagnosis, however, and many who score above 32 and even meet the diagnostic criteria for mild autism or Asperger's report no difficulty functioning in their everyday lives.

Wafflez
02-19-09, 08:34 PM
I got 14, what does this mean?

trashion
02-19-09, 08:49 PM
I got a 32 as well...

I've always suspected it a little bit, though.

Song of Mercy
02-19-09, 09:05 PM
22


song

ADHDKylee
02-19-09, 09:07 PM
Is this supposed to mean if you score over 16 you have Autism?

Song of Mercy
02-19-09, 10:11 PM
Kylee what star was saying (if I understand her right) is that a score of 34 or higher indicate possible autism or related disorder.


Song

ADHDKylee
02-19-09, 10:35 PM
Kylee what star was saying (if I understand her right) is that a score of 34 or higher indicate possible autism or related disorder.


Song
I wouldn't put that idea in my head since I got a 34.. My parents would really kill me if I had anything close to Autism

michele223
02-20-09, 02:52 AM
Since we already see a child psychiatrist and psychologist would they be the ones to diagnose the Aspergers or would we need a neuro dev Dr.? We also see a neuro tic Dr. but he has never said he suspects Aspergers and we have seen him for six years. I did ask him last visit and he said a diagnosis is not as important as the treatment of symptoms. He does have him on Abilify for the tics and moods and the psych recently added a med for the ADHD. I am thinking he may be on the spectrum but very high functioning. Is it worth a visit to an autism specialist. My son also has suspected PANDAS OCD.

someoneherre
02-20-09, 03:54 AM
Took this thing many times. For some reason asperbergers was always a fear for me.
I've always scored under 20. All other online tests way in the normal side of things. (for someone with adhd that is) Its not that I'd don't like people or can't have a good conversation or that i can't read people decently, its just that i'm terrifically shy with new people. I've gotten better but my mother is the same way.

roseblood
02-20-09, 08:47 AM
The unit sent my mum and me a longer quesionnaire with different questions as well and I think I scored much more highly on that one. I seemed to tick a lot more of the boxes that were obviously indicators of a PDD. I don't think I have many of the social problems or obsessive problems at all, mainly the associated traits relating to sensory processing, coordination, fear and early development, so different questionnaires get different results. The annoying thing is I don't really care as the psychological therapy for it wouldn't stop me stimming or make me better coordinated, which are my problems now, and there are no drugs for it so an autism diagnosis would be useless to me, yet they want me to wait until I've been assessed for it.

γ-quantum
02-20-09, 10:23 AM
Score: 49

some doctor suggested i may have asperger's, but my ADHD clinic said i only have autistic traits and they cannot verify the diagnosis of asperger's, as i do have some social skills, even though i e.g. hardly use gestics etc., but then again, i do use a fair amount of facial expressions. correctly interpreting other people's intentions, especially irony, is pretty hard for me though.
...but the thing is that i just *learned* social skills to some extent, it wasnt 'natural' for me. for example, i used to always say what was on my mind without saying it in a roundabout way, which got me into very, very deep trouble... so i learned to be a hypocrite, as that is needed in the human world. i only got the hang of that in my early 20ies though.

all i know is that i dont particulary enjoy human company, i prefer being alone with my 'special areas of interest'.
that's why i also love the internet - you can easily find people who are alike you and then communicate with them in easy-to-interpret text with the ocassional use of smileys, which are much easier to read than real facial expressions. of course it can still lead to misunderstandings, but its just much less stressful and actually enjoyable that way.

TygerSan
02-20-09, 10:52 AM
I always score somewhere in the 20's on this. I think that ppl with ADHD will score slightly higher than the average, simply b/c some of the questions address areas of weakness for the ADHD'er as well: like hyperfocus, not noticing details, not enjoying certain types of reading, etc.

sarey
02-20-09, 12:14 PM
Interesting...
34.
I'm 16 btw.

ADHDKylee
02-20-09, 01:00 PM
Interesting...
34.
I'm 16 btw.
I got 34 too, and I'm only 15.. A year younger than you. How could most of us have Autism though?

frankfarter
02-20-09, 11:26 PM
28, i would say im not low on the scale but i have quite a few social tendencies towards it.

kettish
02-21-09, 12:09 AM
24. But like it was said before, if you know anything about autism spectrum disorders it's easy to bias the test. Which I did. Because I always do with these things. I want to pass the test, darn it!!! Lol. Give me a personality quiz, a career test, SATs, psych screenings online-I can pass 'em all, and skew them exactly as I want to. Not on purpose, really-just to get the grade/whatever that I think I should have. I dunno.

Tachyon
02-21-09, 01:06 AM
Score: 38


what does it mean?

qhcowgirl
02-21-09, 01:21 AM
24 here

JWhitt
02-21-09, 01:42 AM
Autism is a blanket term for a number of social dysfunctions not otherwise explained. I'm not saying it doesn't exist but it is more likely that it is a collection of separate diseases with seemingly similar symptoms. I wouldn't be surprised if you score high on an autism "test" and you don't have autism as the criteria for diagnosing Autism at this point are still quite vague.

meadd823
02-21-09, 06:36 AM
22



That is the same thing I got - 22.

I noticed a number of things they would attribute to AS are also common for ADDers as well - Like sucking at chit chat - both an ADDer and some one with AS may not do will with it often times it is for different reasons.

Some one with AS - it simply would not occur to them to "chit-chat' plus from what little I know their subject interest tends to be narrow.

Where as an ADDer may not due will because they zone out or wander off - or they may have poor personal boundaries and say things they should not.

There was a question about being able to see things mentally - this is part of my dyslexia so again my answers are the same but for different reasons

sarey
02-21-09, 07:41 AM
I got 34 too, and I'm only 15.. A year younger than you. How could most of us have Autism though?

*shrugs*
ADHD can have some symptoms from Autism too, I don't know though, I've never been tested for it.

speedo
02-21-09, 09:25 AM
The big difference between ADHD and autism is in the areas of theory of mind and central coherency. That is, a person with autism may not be very good at modeling in their mind what other people might be thinking/feeling while a person with adhd can do this easily. Beyond that adhd and autism can and often do appear to be very similar. One notable exception is that adults with AS often can pass the usual tests for theory of mind. It is thought that many people with AS eventually learn theory of mind as they approach adulthood.


Me :D

PinkRoxy
02-25-09, 03:49 AM
I got a score of 6.

But I do show traits of ADD. But could it be that Im not great with anything to do with numbers at all ??

PinkRoxy
02-25-09, 03:56 AM
ha ha I just read through and I got the lowest score.

That is so typical of me I always get the lowest score in tests at school. Im just not bright at all.:(

ADHDKylee
02-25-09, 05:12 PM
*shrugs*
ADHD can have some symptoms from Autism too, I don't know though, I've never been tested for it.
I find it weird.. Because my grandma seems to think I have Aspergers and I kind of fit the criteria

PinkRoxy
02-27-09, 02:19 AM
well actually there are far too many labels around these days. Back in the days there was no labels for any disorders that people could possibly have, everyone was just made to be unique in their own way.

There were still some disabilities such as mental retardation but those people tend to look different aswell as acting different and it was very noticeable. But other than that there were no ADD or autism. So therefore those people were just considered normal but just had trouble with the academic side of things and the way they function.

Stace
02-27-09, 02:32 PM
39. I think I have Aspergers.

Rishnak
03-05-09, 04:58 PM
Ahh! I recently took that test online and my score was...

... 41.
:eek:

Alexzander'smom
03-13-09, 12:01 PM
I have a 4 year old son with autism and scored a 37 on the test. Good or bad ??

Beautiful Wreck
04-28-10, 04:03 PM
I got a 12.

mildadhd
04-28-10, 04:42 PM
30
fh

andy12345
05-31-10, 06:09 PM
Hello and.....

AQ test 25-30, takes me about 25 mins to be objective about it.....

EQ/SQ revised Empathizer vs systemizer........ 43 and 38 respectively. or was it the other way doh!

Justtess
05-31-10, 06:30 PM
Welcome Andy.



The big difference between ADHD and autism is in the areas of theory of mind and central coherency. That is, a person with autism may not be very good at modeling in their mind what other people might be thinking/feeling while a person with adhd can do this easily. Beyond that adhd and autism can and often do appear to be very similar. One notable exception is that adults with AS often can pass the usual tests for theory of mind. It is thought that many people with AS eventually learn theory of mind as they approach adulthood.


Me :D

That is what I have been noticing about my DS17! I had the opportunity to work with a few unmedicated dx children and I found if I pointed out facial expressions and body language to them, they were quickly able to identify this while playing with their peers and adjust socially. The children I worked with adapted quickly and were able to look for the same cues months later.

My dx son will take such info under consideration but needs to test it out further and then will miss the cue again. It could be as simple as his friend moving away from the door to allow him in. He'll insist a few minutes later his friend did not like him and doesn't want to talk to him.

I scored a 30.... I'm not dx with ADHD but have anxiety issues for the past 10 years. I love numbers and statistics. I can generally tell and get a bit upset if the numbers do not appear in a normal range without some sort of valid explaination.

String
05-31-10, 06:37 PM
I scored a 36. Diagnosed with ADHD.

Lunacie
05-31-10, 07:03 PM
I have one granddaughter diagnosed with severe ADHD and another with Autism. I believe I have some traits of both disorders. My score was 34, but I've been having a good day, it could have gone higher. I'm sure it went higher when I was younger, but I've learned some ways of coping.

I've always struggled with making eye contact and reading body language. I've always been a tapper and a rocker and a fidgetter (drove my family crazy). I've always been pretty much a hermit and hate parties because there is more than one convo going on and I can't focus on any one voice out of the cacophony. I have a really hard time starting a convo, but was told that I was shy. I definately perfer certain kinds of clothing, and tend to eat the same things although it's not a really short list. I've always liked to line up things. Have a very quick temper and have always Hated! change. I get really upset when I'm interrupted. Sounds a lot like some form of Autism to me.

doiadhd
05-31-10, 07:54 PM
30...give or take 5!

If i read books this test would have been a lot easier..

Is this test for adults...if so-i struggled on a lot of questions,is Autism even noticable to the occupier...or is the only obtain this info about ourselves,through that of experience and other peoples words.

Justtess
05-31-10, 09:06 PM
30...give or take 5!

If i read books this test would have been a lot easier..

Is this test for adults...if so-i struggled on a lot of questions,is Autism even noticable to the occupier...or is the only obtain this info about ourselves,through that of experience and other peoples words.

I thought about the very same thing. Self-perception may be a bit off to how others percieve myself :p

humandefault
05-31-10, 09:08 PM
I got 7, my weird friend got 10, and my boyfriend got 42. I made him take it for fun, before I really learned much about Autism and Asperger's. But it turns out he fits literally every diagnostic criterion for Asperger's, but he's taking Celexa so his symptoms are well managed. It's pretty interesting that taking this test for fun was what helped him figure that out lol

meridian
05-31-10, 09:30 PM
Agree: 2,4,5,6,7,12,13,18,19,21,22,23,41,42,45,46: 1 point
Disagree: 8,11,14,15,17,24,27,28,31,32,36,37,38,40,44: 1 point
Score: 31

doiadhd
05-31-10, 09:33 PM
I thought about the very same thing. Self-perception may be a bit off to how others percieve myself :p

Thats how i was trying to word it !

I spent ages trying to make that sentence make sense....glad i did:D

*********

Something that i did find very interesting on the quiz...was the question that went-'can you tell what people are thinking and feeling by their faces'

I scored it as high as possible....and wanted to emphasize the fact...

I have also been meaning to open a thread....to find out what this is-is a huge problem for me...if people thought of me in better light,i would not have as many problems...

It is worse when it is someone i know...and if their words do not match their faces or movements/timing.....i'm on it-this is what i believed to be a type of hyper-focus...but when it is people..can anyone enlighten me on this matter?

peripatetic
05-31-10, 10:24 PM
if people thought of me in better light,i would not have as many problems...

It is worse when it is someone i know...and if their words do not match their faces or movements/timing.....i'm on it-this is what i believed to be a type of hyper-focus...but when it is people..can anyone enlighten me on this matter?

29:confused: i have no concept of what that means or what it means relative to what i expected...and that's mostly because i also have no idea what i expected.

i do think that if everyone agreed to be totally literal at minimum, or just go with thinking the best, and not read any random negative connotations into what i say (...and write, but i'd like to think the edit button serves a purpose) i'd be less confused about what's happening in general, what's expected of me and why things are upsetting, and others would be less offended.

i'm unsure about the second part. if i detect hypocrisy, deceit, insincerity, etc...i find it insulting. overall, though, i think i take people too literally and that's the source of any social awkwardness and confusion i have.

oh, and the very first part that i neglected to quote, about how one appears to others: i have no idea how i appear to others really because i can't fathom seeing myself as other...as object and not through me, if that makes sense (i guess i'm saying i suck at self-assessment as fixed because i'm bombarded by myself as experienced).

k31kozumi
06-01-10, 01:32 AM
i got a 22

novagal
06-01-10, 01:58 AM
I got a 33.

tudorose
06-15-10, 10:45 AM
32. I don't really know if that means anything

yankees440
06-18-10, 02:31 AM
I got a 16... For some reason I sometimes think I might have asperger's, but anyone I asked including my doctor and a past therapist said I do not show any signs of Asperger's, so I really dunno??

Abi
09-26-10, 12:33 AM
24 ...

APSJ
09-26-10, 01:37 AM
33..sort of surprised it's not higher.

StoicNate
09-26-10, 02:28 AM
I am diagnosed professionally with both Asperger's and ADHD.

Fortune
09-26-10, 06:07 AM
24

For the longest time I thought I might have Asperger's, but as it turns out it apparently has some symptom overlap with anxiety.

ADHDTigger
09-26-10, 11:57 AM
39

*sigh*

Imnapl
09-26-10, 12:43 PM
8 ~ I can't remember numbers if my life depended on it

βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
09-26-10, 03:41 PM
39

*sigh*

Why the sigh?:confused:

Is it because the quotient is higher this go round than when you took it last year? or are you expressing dismay for generally feeling more shut down because of recent stresses? =-/

----------------

I scored a 31. I think if I had let my boyfriend take it for me, he would have scored me higher...:p

namazu
09-26-10, 04:42 PM
24, undoubtedly with some bias. I concur that there is some overlap between the items trying to get at autism-spectrum tendencies and things that are common to people with ADHD (and/or social anxiety, and/or certain LDs, and/or other conditions).

ADHDTigger
09-26-10, 09:06 PM
Why the sigh?:confused:

Is it because the quotient is higher this go round than when you took it last year? or are you expressing dismay for generally feeling more shut down because of recent stresses? =-/

----------------

I scored a 31. I think if I had let my boyfriend take it for me, he would have scored me higher...:p

I guess because, while I know that I have tested high for Aspergers in the past, I hoped that I could somehow improve that.

I suppose that the score is skewed somewhat due to everything of the past couple of months or so. Hard one to call. I know I fudged a few responses because GENERALLY the answer would have been different but currently it isn't.

Eventually, I will get a grip. Not today.

Myth
09-26-10, 09:39 PM
I scored 34.

salleh
09-27-10, 12:02 AM
I got a 23, but that doesn't surprise me much, don't think I lean in that direction .....and if I had taken the test when I was younger, my score would hahve been even lower, when I was a kid and up till my world fell apart when I was 34, I was quite the social butterfly actually.,.......


of course, people laughed at me, but in a nice way for the most part, I was amusing ......

INaBOX
09-27-10, 01:18 AM
My son scored 33. He is going to be re-evaluated for Autism soon. I'm on the fence. Sometimes I think YES and sometimes I think a definite NO. It's really hard to say.
I (gawd) can't remember what I just scored LOL It was either a 22, or 23?

ADDequate
09-27-10, 02:10 AM
Well....

My partner scored 27
I scored 42
My son scored 41
Daughter doesn't have the understanding to take that test yet...

Interesting.....................!
Hmmmmm.....

Nitz
10-25-10, 03:39 PM
I scored 39. :eek:
I'll be a diagnosed Aspie if I'll ever go and tell my psych about how I don't get WTH do people want from me & why do they react to things so randomly....Just cuz people are confusing sht.

ADDisme2010
10-25-10, 04:56 PM
31, finally finished the test, almost quit lol

sprite
10-25-10, 06:33 PM
I scored 31 as well. But I deal with anxiety and lots of the questions touch on things that could be anxiety-related. Also lots I was not really sure how to answer so I just took a guess.

JustmeChristy
10-25-10, 07:48 PM
Autism, ADD/ADHD and Sensory Processing/Sensory Integration Disorder are all linked from what I understand. My child was diagnosed with High functioning Autism and Sensory Integration Disorder but to a Doctor that wasn't fully aware of ALL of her symptoms she could easily be diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. Many people who have Sensory disorders are misdiagnosed with ADD/ADHD. I took my girls to a daycare and the lady who watched them said that 28 years ago her son was diagnosed with ADHD but when she watched my daughter and I explained to her what Sensory Integration Disorder was she immediately researched it and now she is convinced that her son was misdiagnosed. It's just too bad that there isn't a simple blood test to tell us all exactly what is going on. It would've been a lot easier with my daughter. Aspergers & Autism people usually have some sort of sensory issue.

I scored a 34

Spikey 723
10-27-10, 08:02 AM
33.

"Eighty percent of those diagnosed with autism or a related disorder scored 32 or higher"

Perhaps my doctor is right to send me for an aspergers assessment in the new year!

Nitz
10-27-10, 11:02 AM
31, finally finished the test, almost quit lol
xdddd

chips
10-27-10, 11:05 AM
46, I've done this test a couple of times and just did it right then again and didn't even see this post!! I do have Non verbal learning disorder as well as the ADHD.

Vietnam Was Fun
10-27-10, 11:19 AM
This is bull****. I know people with aspergers and you can sure as hell tell they have it. It's not just "a little quirky".

Sauce1800
01-09-11, 04:49 PM
I got 16

weird. When I was a kid, I was actually diagnosed with mild aspergers.

fracturedstory
01-09-11, 08:39 PM
This is bull****. I know people with aspergers and you can sure as hell tell they have it. It's not just "a little quirky".
There are different severities of AS.
Some people you can't tell have it, other are more obvious.

Lunacie
01-10-11, 09:22 AM
This is bull****. I know people with aspergers and you can sure as hell tell they have it. It's not just "a little quirky".

And it's possible that you know others who have Asperger's but you can't tell they have it.

But since you have such a strong feeling about this, what are your credentials for diagnosing Asperger's?

I ask because our first therapist, who has an Autistic son himself and thought he was very familiar with Autism, had a very difficult time diagnosing it in my granddaughter. Later on, going by this therapists notes as well as our personal accounts, a child development specialist said he would not have had any problem diagnosing her with Autism.

bof00
01-10-11, 11:07 AM
24, although I have the same common interests (generally math, science, computers, etc.), my behavior isn't the same. I can't stand routine, love change, not THAT big on reading, I do socialize, don't walk on my toes or hand flap, look people in the eyes, and have too many interests to count.

Yet, communication sometimes feels unnatural - like I observe typical interaction and try to apply that myself - maybe from not paying attention to full conversations, I think it makes me act differently in social situations even though I don't think I have much anxiety over it.

I read a thread in an aspie forum, "you know your aspie if..." and out of 200 or so, I only related to about 5 and those are easily ADD things.

But, if I were to tell someone how I was as a kid, they'd think aspie right away. I was fixing computers when 8 - testing, rebuilding, reformatting, etc. When I was 6, adults would bet me that I couldn't do a large multiplication problem in my head, such as 498*682 - yes, I'd do it in my head and always won. It took a minute, I didn't just pop out the answer. I don't know how I could pick up a math book and understand everything, but was just learning to read english at 5. I know now that isn't normal, but don't really know what to make of that.

Fortune
01-10-11, 11:18 AM
399,636

I was already reading at a high school level at 5. It took me a few more years before I could do mental arithmetic. What do I use it for now? Calculating tips. But hey, it impresses my friends. :D

I identified with a lot more than five of those things on that thread (if it's the same thread). So many of them were exactly things that I've done.

bof00
01-10-11, 11:42 AM
Thanks Fortune, now I don't feel so different. :) It took me until 8 or 9 to be at a high school reading level. I was behind you there. ;) I skipped two grades. It was totally ADD looking back at that too. I got Cs, and my teacher knew I knew everything already, so she made a deal that if I actually DID my work (harder work given to me than the others) for 3 months - which I bargained down to 2 months - that I would be skipped, LOL - that made me do my work :D

I was looking at this thread and none of it is me. http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt64945.html

Lunacie
01-10-11, 12:50 PM
I was looking at this thread and none of it is me. http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt64945.html

Some of the things on that list describe me, but I suspect I'm more on the Autism spectrum than the Asperger's.

I don't know if I tried reading high school books in primary school, but I always read my brother's books before school started (we used to get the books when we enrolled the week before) and he was 2 grades above me. I loved my mother's college book about the history of the Greek gods when I was in middle school. I'm sure it was the subject matter ... ;)

Fortune
01-10-11, 12:59 PM
Some of the things on that list describe me, but I suspect I'm more on the Autism spectrum than the Asperger's.

I don't know if I tried reading high school books in primary school, but I always read my brother's books before school started (we used to get the books when we enrolled the week before) and he was 2 grades above me. I loved my mother's college book about the history of the Greek gods when I was in middle school. I'm sure it was the subject matter ... ;)

Asperger's is on the autism spectrum.

I was obsessed with the Dodekatheon at 5-6. I knew everything there was to know about them (that I could find anyway) and knew far too much about impregnation via swan, bull, or rays of golden light for that age. I was enthralled with the shapeshifting and the transformations the gods could do in the stories, and I probably read like 3-4 versions of every myth (and drained the library dry). I was in love with the idea of Pegasus.

I also got seriously into the Aesir as well. It is amazing I wasn't writing Aesir/Dodekatheon fanfic before the age of 10, let alone ever.

And that is exactly the thread I was thinking of.

Lunacie
01-10-11, 01:41 PM
Asperger's is on the autism spectrum.

I was obsessed with the Dodekatheon at 5-6. I knew everything there was to know about them (that I could find anyway) and knew far too much about impregnation via swan, bull, or rays of golden light for that age. I was enthralled with the shapeshifting and the transformations the gods could do in the stories, and I probably read like 3-4 versions of every myth (and drained the library dry). I was in love with the idea of Pegasus.

I also got seriously into the Aesir as well. It is amazing I wasn't writing Aesir/Dodekatheon fanfic before the age of 10, let alone ever.

And that is exactly the thread I was thinking of.

I know that Asperger's is included in the Autism Spectrum - but it seems to have some unique traits that I've never really had. If you look at the broader Autism spectrum however, you'll find me sitting in a muddle right in the middle somewhere.

Funny, my mother was a hand-flapper and very jumpy, but showed few other traits. I only flap when I'm really anxious, generally I rock. Doesn't matter what kind of chair I'm sitting in, I rock. Always have. But rockers and porch swings have always been my favorites.

Fortune
01-10-11, 06:56 PM
I know that Asperger's is included in the Autism Spectrum - but it seems to have some unique traits that I've never really had. If you look at the broader Autism spectrum however, you'll find me sitting in a muddle right in the middle somewhere.

What do you mean about unique traits? I'm curious.

fracturedstory
01-11-11, 03:19 AM
People with AS learned things like reading, spelling, walking, talking early. People with classic autism were delayed in this.
People with AS usually have a high verbal IQ, people with classic autism it's more low to average.

I can usually tell the difference between high functioning autism and AS. There are physical signs. Also with AS you aren't supposed to have any self help skill delays.

I fit high functioning autism, though sometimes I can fit moderate. I was delayed in learning to speak, read/write, walk - lots of things really. I was just a bit behind my peers. I never really had an exceptional ability to do math or any of the other things people with AS had. I could barely speak though I was capable of saying simple sentences.

Fortune
01-11-11, 03:41 AM
People with AS learned things like reading, spelling, walking, talking early. People with classic autism were delayed in this.
People with AS usually have a high verbal IQ, people with classic autism it's more low to average.

Thank you. I wasn't thinking of those, as I thought they'd already been mentioned, but I was probably thinking of a different thread. I probably should have asked if there was anything other than those things, rather than the more generally worded question.

I can usually tell the difference between high functioning autism and AS. There are physical signs. Also with AS you aren't supposed to have any self help skill delays.

I think I've come across people with AS who have had some self-help skill delays, although perhaps not pervasively so.

Lunacie
01-11-11, 12:19 PM
People with AS learned things like reading, spelling, walking, talking early. People with classic autism were delayed in this.
People with AS usually have a high verbal IQ, people with classic autism it's more low to average.

I can usually tell the difference between high functioning autism and AS. There are physical signs. Also with AS you aren't supposed to have any self help skill delays.

I fit high functioning autism, though sometimes I can fit moderate. I was delayed in learning to speak, read/write, walk - lots of things really. I was just a bit behind my peers. I never really had an exceptional ability to do math or any of the other things people with AS had. I could barely speak though I was capable of saying simple sentences.

Well, I don't have any experience with AS in young children, or with classic Autism. My granddaughter has Atypical Autism (high-functioning, PDD-NOS), so she was very delayed in speaking but has developed a huge and varied vocabulary. Self-help skills have been very slow to develop. She wears pants with elastic waist because buttons and zippers have been far to difficult for her, although she recently learned to zip her own coat at the age of 9. YAY! We try to give her space to try things and develop skills as she becomes interested in trying, except for allowing her to measure and dispense her own medications. Not yet, my dear, not just yet.

fracturedstory
01-11-11, 05:50 PM
Well, I don't have any experience with AS in young children, or with classic Autism. My granddaughter has Atypical Autism (high-functioning, PDD-NOS), so she was very delayed in speaking but has developed a huge and varied vocabulary. Self-help skills have been very slow to develop. She wears pants with elastic waist because buttons and zippers have been far to difficult for her, although she recently learned to zip her own coat at the age of 9. YAY! We try to give her space to try things and develop skills as she becomes interested in trying, except for allowing her to measure and dispense her own medications. Not yet, my dear, not just yet.
People with PDD speak much later than autism don't they? I know someone who didn't talk until she was five. It doesn't make much sense to me because some people with autism can still not speak at five years old.
I don't remember when I learnt to speak but I remember saying words at 3 and 4. I was a very quiet child and delayed in early school things like reading, writing, doing arithmetic (still barely at 6th grade level) and even dressing myself. I remember the first time I had to do chores was at a school camp when I was 13. But I think that was because I wasn't taught them. Thing about autistic kids is their parents don't think they're ready to do things, especially back in the early 90's. There's probably a lot more awareness for it now and it's a bit more easier to get the right support.
It's good that your granddaughter is allowed to work at her own pace. I learnt to zip jackets a few years earlier than that. I hated zip or button flies though. And buttoning up shirts took much more time to master. And every time I tie my laces now I'm just reminded of being 6 years old and struggling with that.

Fortune
01-11-11, 05:54 PM
I think PDD-NOS is mainly that you have severe impairments that don't fit the all the criteria for autism. At least that's what everything I read recently was saying. That is, you use the same criteria for autism, but the distribution of impairments would otherwise not indicate a diagnosis.

Lunacie
01-11-11, 06:28 PM
People with PDD speak much later than autism don't they? I know someone who didn't talk until she was five. It doesn't make much sense to me because some people with autism can still not speak at five years old.

I don't remember when I learnt to speak but I remember saying words at 3 and 4. I was a very quiet child and delayed in early school things like reading, writing, doing arithmetic (still barely at 6th grade level) and even dressing myself. I remember the first time I had to do chores was at a school camp when I was 13. But I think that was because I wasn't taught them.

Thing about autistic kids is their parents don't think they're ready to do things, especially back in the early 90's. There's probably a lot more awareness for it now and it's a bit more easier to get the right support.
It's good that your granddaughter is allowed to work at her own pace. I learnt to zip jackets a few years earlier than that. I hated zip or button flies though. And buttoning up shirts took much more time to master. And every time I tie my laces now I'm just reminded of being 6 years old and struggling with that.

I remember struggling with the zipper on my jacket when I was in primary school. I know it took a while to learn to tie my shoes, but once I had it I was good. Buttons and zippers are still hard for me at times.

We've encouraged my granddaughter to get herself dressed and she's been able to do that for the most part since she was 7. Like I said, we buy pull-on pants and pull-on tops. She just figured out socks this year really, and still struggles with getting the heel on top of her foot at times. I just find it hard to be patient and wait for my granddaughter to do things on her own when it's so much faster for me to help her. I've really had to distract myself and give her a chance.

She doesn't like to pick out her own clothes, maybe because we make funny faces and suggest that her shirt doesn't really match her pants as well as another shirt would. Her mom has tried folding matching shirts and pants together for her to just grab a set, but she prefers to have one of us get the clothes out for her to start putting them on.

We generally help her get her bra on straight - I didn't learn how to fasten the hooks behind my back (instead of hooking it in front and then twisting it around my body) until I was in my 30's. How's that for delayed!


I think PDD-NOS is mainly that you have severe impairments that don't fit the all the criteria for autism. At least that's what everything I read recently was saying. That is, you use the same criteria for autism, but the distribution of impairments would otherwise not indicate a diagnosis.

When we were finally able to get a proper diagnosis for my granddaughter at the age of 8, the doctor said that he would have most certainly have given a diagnosis of Autism when whe was young, before the age of 6. But she had made so much progress he was callling it Atypical Autism, or PDD-NOS, at this point. Apparently he doesn't think her impairment is as severe now.

Fortune
01-11-11, 06:36 PM
When we were finally able to get a proper diagnosis for my granddaughter at the age of 8, the doctor said that he would have most certainly have given a diagnosis of Autism when whe was young, before the age of 6. But she had made so much progress he was callling it Atypical Autism, or PDD-NOS, at this point. Apparently he doesn't think her impairment is as severe now.

This doesn't quite make sense to me. Learning coping skills doesn't make the underlying condition go away, right?

By severe impairments, though, I was quoting the DSM-IV. I am not sure you actually need to have speech delays to be diagnosed PDD-NOS, but since it's based on autism and not Asperger's, it's probably leaning in that direction.

Lunacie
01-11-11, 07:01 PM
This doesn't quite make sense to me. Learning coping skills doesn't make the underlying condition go away, right?

By severe impairments, though, I was quoting the DSM-IV. I am not sure you actually need to have speech delays to be diagnosed PDD-NOS, but since it's based on autism and not Asperger's, it's probably leaning in that direction.

Her autism hasn't gone away, she's just dealing with it really well now. Since it's a spectrum disorder, she's simply moved up a bit on the spectrum, but she's still on it and will always be so.

Fortune
01-11-11, 10:10 PM
Her autism hasn't gone away, she's just dealing with it really well now. Since it's a spectrum disorder, she's simply moved up a bit on the spectrum, but she's still on it and will always be so.

I understood that. I think I failed to communicate what I was trying to say:

She's not diagnosed only because of her condition, but also because of the state of her coping skills - huh? I don't understand how this works.

fracturedstory
01-12-11, 04:43 AM
Her autism hasn't gone away, she's just dealing with it really well now. Since it's a spectrum disorder, she's simply moved up a bit on the spectrum, but she's still on it and will always be so.
Wouldn't she have high functioning autism then? I still think it's important to be diagnosed HFA. I am and I was probably at the level of your granddaughter.
Fitting the heel of the sock onto my heel was something I found difficult even at 10.
I didn't have a proper bra until I was 16. Good thing I wasn't that developed.

Anyway I think that doctor's see a lot of progress from what could have been severe/moderate autism and so they think someone no longer needs that diagnosis. They also have differing opinions on what autism is. People still see is in the most severe sense still.

Fortune
01-12-11, 05:00 AM
It seems (based on some reading I was doing earlier) that some doctors in the US think that PDD-NOS is meant for milder cases of autism, rather than cases that don't strictly fit the diagnostic criteria.

I believe also that the FDA is fairly strict about some things so treatments approved for autistic people are not approved for people diagnosed PDD-NOS, even though there may not be an actual difference in their needs.

Lunacie
01-12-11, 11:48 AM
Wouldn't she have high functioning autism then? I still think it's important to be diagnosed HFA. I am and I was probably at the level of your granddaughter.
Fitting the heel of the sock onto my heel was something I found difficult even at 10.
I didn't have a proper bra until I was 16. Good thing I wasn't that developed.

Anyway I think that doctor's see a lot of progress from what could have been severe/moderate autism and so they think someone no longer needs that diagnosis. They also have differing opinions on what autism is. People still see is in the most severe sense still.

We always considered her to be HFA. That's what the therapist said as well. We weren't able to get a proper certified diagnosis until she was 8. It's very difficult if you don't live near a large city. And because she was considered HFA and was already getting some awesome therapy, we didn't push it to get a diagnosis sooner. The school was working with an assumption of PDD-NOS and tailoring her IEP to her personally. It's all good.

String
01-12-11, 02:22 PM
We always considered her to be HFA. That's what the therapist said as well. We weren't able to get a proper certified diagnosis until she was 8. It's very difficult if you don't live near a large city. And because she was considered HFA and was already getting some awesome therapy, we didn't push it to get a diagnosis sooner. The school was working with an assumption of PDD-NOS and tailoring her IEP to her personally. It's all good.

I can't even follow all these acronyms. However, I can see that part of what Lunacie is saying is that getting the best treatment can be more important than the exact diagnosis.

A doctor recently told me that sometimes she knows the right treatment and she has to give a diagnosis with which she doesn't necessarily agree to give that treatment.

Remember, the diagnostic criteria around autism, AS, ADHD (and some of those other acronyms that I don't understand) change. Better treatments, or treatments with which our doctors are familiar, change. We working with a bit of a moving target.

Lunacie
01-12-11, 02:36 PM
I can't even follow all these acronyms. However, I can see that part of what Lunacie is saying is that getting the best treatment can be more important than the exact diagnosis.

A doctor recently told me that sometimes she knows the right treatment and she has to give a diagnosis with which she doesn't necessarily agree to give that treatment.

Remember, the diagnostic criteria around autism, AS, ADHD (and some of those other acronyms that I don't understand) change. Better treatments, or treatments with which our doctors are familiar, change. We working with a bit of a moving target.

Yep, that's what I'm saying. Nice way of phrasing it differently. Thank you. That's what they basically told us at school - that the diagnosis isn't going to affect her IEP really, except that an IEP ends when the child is 18 and a 504 Plan will go with the child thru college. (Unless I have that backwards and I don't think I do) The diagnosis can make a difference as to what therapies are covered by certain insurance plans though.


ASD = Autism spectrum disorder
AS = Asperger's syndrome
HFA = high functioning Autism
PDD-NOS = pervasive development disorder - not otherwise specified
IEP = independent education plan

Are there any other acronyms you're not sure of?

namazu
01-12-11, 09:02 PM
an IEP ends when the child is 18 and a 504 Plan will go with the child thru college. (Unless I have that backwards and I don't think I do)

The authorization for IEPs stems from the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). IEPs are therefore limited to pre-K though grade 12 education (up to age 21 in some cases), with perhaps some transitional planning towards the end.

504 Plans, on the other hand, fall under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (hence the name).

This page gives an overview of the requirements of ADA, Section 504, and IDEA: http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content3/ada.idea.html

IEPs are "stronger" at the K-12 level, with a clear follow-up process that's supposed to happen (but doesn't always), and may include progress goals, interventions, provisions for extra services or additional staff, modifications to the curriculum, etc.

504 Plans tend to be less involved, outlining mainly "lighter" types of accommodations that can be implemented more easily (e.g. testing accommodations, taking breaks during long classes, note-taking, etc.). Many times a student with ADHD or another condition who does not qualify for an IEP according to the district's evaluation will still qualify for a 504 Plan under "Other Health Impaired".

In general, a 504 Plan for a student written by a K-12 school district won't directly accompany that student through college, either. However:
- Most colleges and universities must abide by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and provide accommodations to students with disabilities (i.e. the same law applies in college as well as in earlier grades). This is in addition to the Americans with Disabilities Act, by the way.
- A record of a 504 Plan in the K-12 years can be included among documentation of a disability. (By itself, a 504 Plan is almost always insufficient, so other documentation is needed.) This documentation may help a student demonstrate eligibility for accommodations, and also suggest which accommodations may be appropriate or have been helpful in the past.
- Students may ultimately continue to receive similar accommodations at the college level, but colleges are not bound by 504 Plans from K-12 districts.


- Namazu, who benefited from a 504 Plan in high school

Fortune
01-12-11, 09:05 PM
I was thinking more of services, laws, treatments, etc. that are approved specifically for those diagnosed with autism, but may not be applicable to those diagnosed with PDD-NOS or Asperger's Syndrome.

Like in California there are state-funded services that are only available to people diagnosed as autistic. Necessary services can and do extend beyond educational accommodations, and some adults do burn out from trying to maintain a "less autistic" front.

shysmile
01-16-11, 01:32 AM
I scored 17.

Mignon
01-16-11, 03:52 AM
I got 37

:confused:

Kingway
01-19-11, 01:27 AM
24, although I have the same common interests (generally math, science, computers, etc.), my behavior isn't the same. I can't stand routine, love change, not THAT big on reading, I do socialize, don't walk on my toes or hand flap, look people in the eyes, and have too many interests to count.

Yet, communication sometimes feels unnatural - like I observe typical interaction and try to apply that myself - maybe from not paying attention to full conversations, I think it makes me act differently in social situations even though I don't think I have much anxiety over it.

I read a thread in an aspie forum, "you know your aspie if..." and out of 200 or so, I only related to about 5 and those are easily ADD things.

But, if I were to tell someone how I was as a kid, they'd think aspie right away. I was fixing computers when 8 - testing, rebuilding, reformatting, etc. When I was 6, adults would bet me that I couldn't do a large multiplication problem in my head, such as 498*682 - yes, I'd do it in my head and always won. It took a minute, I didn't just pop out the answer. I don't know how I could pick up a math book and understand everything, but was just learning to read english at 5. I know now that isn't normal, but don't really know what to make of that.

I could do that too, at 6-7 I learned the name of all the countries in the world for no reason, I loved to play with a calculator, etc. When I was a kid, I was trying to find a logic in the dates, like to know which day of the week we would be on a X date. I also got 24, and I never really looked like an autistic... well, I'm not autistic.

FelixVita
01-24-11, 02:03 AM
I got a score of 42 points.

I am starting to consider the possibilities of an autism spectrum disorder with ADHD-PI comorbidity.

EshkaronsEngine
01-24-11, 02:19 AM
9.........

Mignon
01-24-11, 02:36 AM
9.........


Wow, such variation among thread posters' experiences.

Fortune
01-24-11, 03:05 AM
Kind of makes one wonder how strong the overlap between ADHD and Asperger's is if ADHDers can score so low. :D

Anyway, there are three other quizzes that exist along with this - empathy quotient, systemizing quotient, and friendship and relationship quotient:

http://homepage.mac.com/lpetrich/Asperger/Index.html

Fortune
01-24-11, 03:21 AM
And taking all four:

AQ: 37
EQ: 23
FQ: 60
SQ: 46

I can't even remember how I answered the AQ last time, that there's such a difference between then and now. It's all pretty subjective, at any rate.

Mignon
01-24-11, 03:24 AM
And taking all four:

AQ: 37
EQ: 23
FQ: 60
SQ: 46

I can't even remember how I answered the AQ last time, that there's such a difference between then and now. It's all pretty subjective, at any rate.

I think you're 1. brave or 2. don't give a toss, Fortune. Either one is admirable. :p

(I'm not commenting on your ^ scores, I don't know what those mean yet)

Fortune
01-24-11, 03:29 AM
They're all in the expected range for Asperger's Syndrome.

I figured if I was going to post the quizzes, I might as well take them and post my scores as well.

tipoo
01-24-11, 10:11 AM
Scored a 30, hmm.

Microwench
01-24-11, 04:43 PM
38

I highly suspect that I have Asperger's along with AD/HD, have wondered about that for a long time. But I feel really awkward asking my therapist to test for it. Heck, I was dead sure of the ADHD and I fel weird adking for that eval.
I have this fear that my doctors (and everyone around me) will think I am a hypochondriac or attention-seeking...*eyeroll*

Microwench
01-25-11, 12:24 PM
Aq: 38
eq: 16
fq: 36
sq: 66

DanaDane
01-31-11, 03:33 PM
aq 27

hypergirl96
02-27-11, 02:35 PM
I got a 14. I only have social anxiety, the other symptoms don't correspond with me at all. At least I can scratch this as being a possibility. lol :D

I definately have social anxiety. ok, gott astop with the self-diagnosing cause it won't get me anywhere. But I'm working on being more extroverted! Woo hoo! lol :D

FaithofLeap
02-27-11, 02:59 PM
I got a 35 :eek:

C8H10N4O2
02-27-11, 05:32 PM
Got a 26, but that could be because I kept wanting to switch agree and disagree... why would you order them like that?! ugh. So frustrating.