View Full Version : Need your input


huskey8
04-29-09, 01:13 PM
Six month ago our 6y/o was dx with ADHD and at danger for oppositional behavior disorder by an experienced child psychologist As she is in public school that set into motion a seriesí of events that were aimed at helping her deal with her disorder in the educational setting. She has done very well this year and after a meeting with her teacher this morning we were told that she has meet all the requirements to be passed on to the next grade level. We have seen an marked improvement in certain aspects of her behavior but she still is unable to maintain her focus for more then a couple of minutes . Anyway during this meeting her teacher brought out the possibility of pharmacological intervention. Her pediatrician is of the opinion that she may grow out of this and has stated his opposition to the use of drugs. We have studied this subject and are split as what we need to do . I can live with my daughters little quarks but I also want her to succeed in life. I have read so many stories about ppl who say that they lost their child once they put them on medication. Any feedback will be appreciated .
Richard

Codykins
04-29-09, 02:56 PM
If you respect your child psychologist I would start there and get an evaluation. I don't like to hear Peds who take a stance on meds - I honestly believe they shouldn't even be permitted to evaluate a disorder like ADHD, a psychologist or Nuro-development doctor should made those evaluations. Anyway, my son at 7 had been on meds since March and doing terrific - his concentration/focus and impulsiveness have improved greatly. Good luck!

huskey8
04-29-09, 03:13 PM
Thank you for your response Our psychologist is against the use of drugs in all but the worst cases. Iím just scared that we will end up with a child who's baseline is flat and who has lost her personality. I have heard this from a number of ppl that they felt that they lost their child when they started them on meds.

blueroo
04-29-09, 06:25 PM
There are some children who seem to have problems like that when they're on the wrong dosage or a medication that doesn't suit them. But it's not as common as folks assume it is.

Justtess
04-29-09, 08:18 PM
Here is my take on medicating children as young as 6 yrs old. I would want there to be some sort of behavioral goal for my child to accomplish while on meds. If he/she was meeting classroom requirements with some behavioral management in the classroom, I would reserve medicating untill later in uppper elementary where they are required to perform more tasks independently for longer time. Is she behind in identifying her letters/sounds, her reading level, number skills, etc...?

I would wonder how talented my child's teacher is in redirecting an ADHD child. Some are wonderful and have them underfoot and still managing the rest of the class while other teachers seem to get thrown off track and has lower tollerance.

I have known some dx children w/o medication who have managed to have a charming personalities who weren't shy to apologize, say excuse me, and ask questions/help repeatedly.

Dizfriz
04-30-09, 10:30 AM
Husky8

This is and should be a major issue for parents. I would be very concerned about any parent who was not concerned about medicating their child.

There are many ways of looking at this. Here is my suggestion:

Explore all other possibilities. Once you have exhausted alternate ways of dealing with your child's ADHD then you can medicate with a clear idea that this is what is best for your child.

I have seen many cases where the milder level of symptoms (still ADHD though) were able to handled by behavioral modification methods designed for ADHD. In these cases medication could sometimes be avoided altogether or at least put off until later.

In any case, using this method, conscience is clear and you have the knowledge that what is being done is what is best for the child using the tools we have available.

Just my thoughts,

Dizfriz

adhd editor
04-30-09, 12:15 PM
Good for you for doing your research before putting your child on medication. There are some helpful alternative ADHD treatments out there. You could try adjusting her diet, giving her supplements, and making sure she is getting enough sleep and exercise. Some parents have great success with a non-medication treatment approach. If you do decide to go the medication route, be sure you work closely with a trusted doctor to get the right medication and dosage.

I suggest you take a look at these article regarding ADHD treatment options. Then you can weight the pros and cons and hopefully come up with some kind of treatment "starting point"

additudemag.com/channel/adhd-treatment/index.html

additudemag.com/adhd/article/1880.html

additudemag.com/adhd/article/718.html

I hope this helps.

angie1960
04-30-09, 12:40 PM
Husky8

This is and should be a major issue for parents. I would be very concerned about any parent who was not concerned about medicating their child.

There are many ways of looking at this. Here is my suggestion:

Explore all other possibilities. Once you have exhausted alternate ways of dealing with your child's ADHD then you can medicate with a clear idea that this is what is best for your child.

I have seen many cases where the milder level of symptoms (still ADHD though) were able to handled by behavioral modification methods designed for ADHD. In these cases medication could sometimes be avoided altogether or at least put off until later.

In any case, using this method, conscience is clear and you have the knowledge that what is being done is what is best for the child using the tools we have available.

Just my thoughts,

Dizfriz

I agree, I have had to put my child on medication but it was a last resort - the response has validated the diagnosis and she is doing very well - however, I fought for a long time, tried various other means and the bottom line was really school - she was not getting it. The Dr. said she was only 50 percent of what she was told.

I was very concerned and still am - I am now fighting putting her on Serequal at night - as that is an option The Dr. has given me - I am waiting to see how the new meds "Foculin" works.

Good Luck - sounds like he's manageable right now - as long as he is I would hold off

mctavish23
05-01-09, 01:58 PM
The caveat for Behavior Management is that the very second you remove the structure

provided by the program, the target behaviors immediately return to baseline.

You also have to be prepared to use rewards over punishments, give immediate and

consistent feedback,as well as recognize the need to change rewards periodically.

Also, "Act Don't Yak," keep you sense of humor, keep a disability perspective,and

practice forgiveness.

Those rec's are all taken for the Clinical Work Book accompanying

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder : A Handbook for Diagnosis & Treatment

by Russell Barkley,Ph D, (2006),New York : Guilford Press.

Good luck.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

MGDAD
05-01-09, 02:24 PM
Huskey,

You talk about pedatrician and you talk about psychologist. Those are completely different types of professionals.

There is no way to know if your child will "grow out of her ADHD". Even so, at what age? A pediatrician that tells you that has a bias that is not based on research.

Proper dosage of medication will not affect your childs personality. It will not make them "flat." If it does it is the wrong med or the wrong dosage. If that happens stop giving the med. Another thing, you will never know if a medication can help your child until you try it.

Having said that, try everything else first, then decide on the med. However, dont wait years to decide. You should be able to implement most changes within a month or two.

Forget about supplements. They are just unproven chemicals that are not called "medication". Medications are just chemicals too. Cocoa leaves are "natural" too.

ADHD Hunter
05-01-09, 02:35 PM
I second MGDAD. I too have an issue with a medical professional suggesting your child will "grow out" of ADHD. It sounds like this person may be a bit uninformed. It's not a "phase". It is a difference in the way the brain functions and processes information.

I am 44 and still waiting to grow out of it. I have been with and without meds and am clearer thinking and less impulsive when on the meds.

momofk
05-14-09, 05:03 PM
My daughter was recently diagosed and our original ped refused acknowledging her difficulties ("ADHD is a myth. Just crank her up on caffeine every morning if you feel you have to do something...") and the second ped sent us out the door with a prescription after a less-than-thorough evaluation. We have since taken her to a naturopath an are trying a high-protein diet supplemented by fish oil (omega-3 fatty acids) and a daily multivitamin (she is a picky eater). Her attitude has improved and she's doing better at school, but the jury is out still as it has been less than a month on this program.

I write just to let you know that there are lots of options out there. Keep an open mind and trust that you know what's best for your child.

good luck

mctavish23
05-14-09, 07:26 PM
I would respectfully suggest your old ped read the Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis

and Treatment of ADHD by :

1) The American Academy of Pediatrics,

2) The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

3) The American Academy of Family Physicians

4) The American Medical Association

5) The American Psychiatric Association

6) Blue Cross / Blue Shield

7) Center for Disease Control

8) US Surgeon General

There's more, but the point is that most people would be humiliated for not knowing that.

Even if their ego outweighed common sense, it's an indefensible position.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)