View Full Version : Managing Disinformation in the Lay Press


Kunga Dorji
05-02-09, 07:53 PM
This is how it was explained to me yesterday by an individual heavily involved in a professional body whos rise to success has been the envy of all other professions in Australia.

The media are in business for money.

The money comes from advertisers.

When an organisation produces such unbalanced rubbish as the Spillane interview the plan is

1) Have a core group of 20 - 50 activists ready to sign their name to a letter at need.

2) Have a form letter that points out the reality of the diagnosis of ADHD and the potential for causing real harm ( up to and including suicide) if an individual does not get proper diagnosis and treatment. This letter can be reused for any media event but quickly modifying the relevant details. The letter should be directed to the cheif executive and publicity branch of the medi company involved and to to the equivalent people in the top 10 or 20 major advertisers for that media cpompany. It should advise the advertisers that they are in danger of blackening their name and contributing to real harm by associating with such pernicious rubbish. The media exec should also be warned off in no uncertain terms.

3) When an event such as the Spillane interview occurs there should be a quick response in the core group to identify the main advertisers and the addresses for letters ( this could be done beforehand for the major offenders). The group members then individually mail the key people - and within days a retraction is virtually guaranteed.

Why be passive?

APSJ
06-16-09, 07:30 PM
Given that there are a number of ADHD advocacy organizations out there, some of which get funding from pharmaceutical companies with deep pockets, I wonder why what you suggest here isn't already being done, or if it is, why it isn't having the desired impact?

I can't think of any group which stands to gain from putting out stuff like the Spillane interview, and lots of groups that stand to lose from it(people with ADHD, mental health professionals, pharmaceutical companies, educators, etc.).

Yet, the vast majority of the time I see ADHD mentioned in the media, its at least partly in a context that is questioning either its existence, or the use of medication to treat it, or both.

Kunga Dorji
06-18-09, 08:19 AM
Given that there are a number of ADHD advocacy organizations out there, some of which get funding from pharmaceutical companies with deep pockets, I wonder why what you suggest here isn't already being done, or if it is, why it isn't having the desired impact?

I can't think of any group which stands to gain from putting out stuff like the Spillane interview, and lots of groups that stand to lose from it(people with ADHD, mental health professionals, pharmaceutical companies, educators, etc.).

Yet, the vast majority of the time I see ADHD mentioned in the media, its at least partly in a context that is questioning either its existence, or the use of medication to treat it, or both.

You need look no further than the followers of a certain recently invented religion- which makes most of its money through selling itsown take on psychology. The ADHD drugs are small change to big pharma- and they generate a fair bit of negative publicity. I asked a rep from one of our local drug companies to sponsor a bit more education for doctors where I live and she ran a milefrom the idea.

APSJ
06-18-09, 02:44 PM
You need look no further than the followers of a certain recently invented religion- which makes most of its money through selling itsown take on psychology. The ADHD drugs are small change to big pharma- and they generate a fair bit of negative publicity. I asked a rep from one of our local drug companies to sponsor a bit more education for doctors where I live and she ran a milefrom the idea.

I suppose casting the issue as a battle between said religion and the pharmaceutical industry would be counterproductive both to the industry and the understanding of the disorder in the proper context. That explains why they don't intervene.

But, what about the APA, the AMA, and all the ADHD advocacy groups? Does the religion you referenced really have a greater influence over media outlets than these groups, or do you think they really don't try to get involved?

The more I think about this, the more I wonder how the coverage can be so one-sided. The next time I see one of these objectionable pieces I'm going to call up some of these groups, suggest they follow the advice you gave in the original post, and see what they say.

If there really isn't anyone responding to these sorts of things, then it seems like a real gap in advocacy efforts that needs to be filled.

salleh
03-16-10, 12:51 AM
I just wish I had a tv ...I'd take part in this program in a heartbeat.....Why is it that so many journalists spout such pernacious baloney ??? do they NOT check facts anymore??

Maybe we could set something like this through this forum ? is is within the guidelines of the forum ?

It seems to me that anything that get the drug companies to be more responsible and responsive to ADD folks would be a great thing .....They stopped making the "brand name" of my meds recently and all I can get are the Barr ones...and leave us face it Barr doesnt' do all that great a job....but when they're your only option ....

...not to mention, not having those "looks" that you get when you present your Schedule II prescription to the pharmasist......sometimes I think I am the only person who needs them, the way that those folks look at me ......

weareacc
03-16-10, 03:50 AM
A useful link to people who need information on this sort of thing:
www.whyweprotest.com

Hubbards lot have LOTS of time/money/manpower and the will to cause havoc.

tudorose
03-30-10, 12:08 AM
I hear ya Barliman. I've found though that the tide is turning and that the negative articles on the online news tend to attract a lot of comments from parents and people with ADHD who are prepared to speak out and shout down any misinformed comments either in the article or by other readers.

This is the article

http://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/kids-on-adhd-drugs-poor-at-school/story-e6frg3pl-1225831273306

and these are our comments

http://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/kids-on-adhd-drugs-poor-at-school/comments-e6frg3pl-1225831273306

These articles are getting fewer and further apart now.