View Full Version : Hypertension linked to ADHD, LD


APSJ
05-07-09, 03:24 PM
http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Non-food/Disease/060520090658_hypertension_linked_to_learning_disab ilities_and_ad.html


The current study of 100 children with high blood pressure and 101 without found that nearly 28 percent of children with hypertension had a learning disability, and 20 percent had ADHD.I wonder what this means? The article has few details of the study. I wonder if they checked to see if the correlation between hypertension and LDs and ADHD still appeared if they controlled for obesity? I also wonder if the difference is small enough to be attributable to the greater stress that kids with these conditions likely have. Without more information, it seems like this doesn't really suggest any causal link between high blood pressure and ADHD or LDs.

If there is a causal connection, however, it seems potentially troubling that some ADHD meds can raise blood pressure.

*KJ*
05-07-09, 03:49 PM
I'd like to see the same study in reverse...do ADHD kids have a higher rate of hypertension?

I'm thinking that there are loads of physical-type insults that can set a kid up with exceptional physical stress...I think that stress could either lead to the appearance of ADHD (like the sleep/ADHD study thing) or it may drain away resources that could perhaps stunt development.

I bet then that they could do similar studies and find that kids with cancer, or maybe CF, or epilepsy or a whole host of other such conditions could set up a scenario where the incedence of ADHD in these populations is greater than norm...just aguess though.

So, I think the bigger question is, is there a higher rate of epilepsy (etc.) in the ADHD populution.

And if yes, then of course the very next question should be, why

Does that seem to make sense?

Dizfriz
05-07-09, 05:19 PM
http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Non-food/Disease/060520090658_hypertension_linked_to_learning_disab ilities_and_ad.html


I wonder what this means? The article has few details of the study. I wonder if they checked to see if the correlation between hypertension and LDs and ADHD still appeared if they controlled for obesity? I also wonder if the difference is small enough to be attributable to the greater stress that kids with these conditions likely have. Without more information, it seems like this doesn't really suggest any causal link between high blood pressure and ADHD or LDs.

If there is a causal connection, however, it seems potentially troubling that some ADHD meds can raise blood pressure.

It is an interesting subject. Thanks for posting it.

The article does not give you much data but it appears that they have found that there may be a correlation between high pressure and ADHD or LD.

Now, many studies of this kind show connective correlations. There is nothing wrong with this as it can be very good data but it has it limits.

I am in a teaching mood so I indulged myself with this post.

To help understand this (for readers who do not familiar with the concept of correlation), I offer this simplified, but I think reasonably accurate description. It is an important subject.

Correlation is simply a number that represents the connection between the items being studied (normally two). It means that the factors are connected in some way but it does not help determine if one causes the other.

A good, and classic, example is that scores on achievement tests are strongly correlated to height. Does that mean that increased height causes better achievement scores. No it is instead age as causation. As kids get older, they tend to get taller and also as they progress through school, they tend to score higher on achievement tests. So here the old saw applies. "Correlation does not imply causation" It is a good thing to keep in mind.

So when you hear that a study shows that one thing is connected or varies with another, it usually means that there is a correlation between them. Like the study APSJ reported, ADHD, LD and high blood pressure show a connection. Usually that is about all they can say without more research.

The primary value of these kinds of study is to point the way for more in depth research on the subject. They are quite valuable in that regard but it is important to keep the limitations in mind when reading.

This study, while apparently not addressing causation, appears to point the way for more research.

Teaching mode off. It is a weakness that I allow myself at times.

Dizfriz

*KJ*
05-08-09, 11:36 AM
Statistics are a remarkable thing...something that is near and dear to my heart as my BS is in mathematics and econometrics, my MS is in statistics...but on their own are meaningless.

You can mathematically correlate almost any 2 things...but it doesn't necessarily mean it makes logical sense...or that they are infact dependant.

For example you could correlate that sunnier days bring more shark attacks. The sunnier days are not responsible for the shark attacks...it's the fact that more people swim on sunnier days. SO the REAL correlation is that when there is more people in the water there is a greater incidence of attack. With some logical reflection the follow-up analysis should consider non-sunny days, and look at 'hot' days (which includes those sunny days). So the real conclusion is more people in the water results in more people being attacked...and really is not directly related to the weather.

The beginning, or sometimes the ending results need to be considered beyond the numbers. There may be some information there...but from where we sit, not much. On the other hand people with hypertention may find this revealing...as now they may conclude that this might be why some struggle with certain activities...the direction is wrong for our purposes it's results are about hypertention not ADHD.

Losti
05-14-09, 07:38 AM
Interesting. I actually have hypotension on the other hand, WITH ADD and LD (Language based more so).