View Full Version : U.S tax credit for people with ADD/ADHD


IBR770
07-05-09, 10:47 PM
Has anyone heard of tax credit in the US for people with ADD/ADHD? I live in Canada but am a US citizen and someone told me that this is maybe a new thing that one can get money if they have ADD! I would love to know if its true and how to go about it.
thank you

Annwn
07-06-09, 06:16 PM
Oh good grief, I certainly hope this is NOT the case. I can't imagine tha - wait, no, I can imagine it.

scarygreengiant
07-06-09, 10:03 PM
What? Why would they give us tax credits? That makes no sense.

KDLMaj
07-07-09, 04:33 AM
Because we have a chronic illness that requires medication and often ongoing therapy?

Sit-n-Spin
03-24-10, 02:39 PM
Has anyone heard of tax credit in the US for people with ADD/ADHD? I live in Canada but am a US citizen and someone told me that this is maybe a new thing that one can get money if they have ADD! I would love to know if its true and how to go about it.
thank you

I believe you can deduct medical expenses if they exceed a certain amount of your gross or adjusted (can't remember) income. I think it's around 7%. So, you'd also have to itemize.

ETA: I see here that it is excess of 7.5% of adjusted gross income (AGI): http://www.hrblock.com/taxes/tax_tips/deductions_credits/medical_expenses.html This is just an excerpt. You would need someone well-versed in tax to determine if any other factors affect you. (You can deduct the cost of the accountant off the top of your income, by the way.) I've also recently learned that there are many items that can be deducted if you have special dietary needs for conditions like Celiac's.

Deductions

If you're self-employed, you may be able to deduct your health insurance premiums as an adjustment, but only up to the amount of income from your business. If you're not self-employed, you can deduct your medical expenses only if you itemize deductions. You can deduct only the amount that is more than 7.5% of your AGI.


medical insurance, including Medicare B and Medicare D premiums
prescription drugs
medical procedures
mileage to and from medical facilities


Keep in mind, your health insurance premiums can't be deducted if they're taken out of your paycheck as pre-tax dollars. You also can't deduct expenses you pay with pre-tax dollars (for example, amounts paid using your employer's FSA).

Eligible medical procedures include surgery, certain fertility enhancement procedures, LASIK and similar procedures, and vasectomies.

The IRS has held that the cost of a full-body scan is deductible, even if you have no specific ailment and even if a doctor did not prescribe the procedure.

You can deduct the actual cost of traveling to and from a medical facility or, if you drive, you can deduct 24 cents per mile. If you meet specific requirements, you can deduct the cost of lodging not provided in a hospital or other medical facility, up to $50 a night.

Because medical bills are deductible only to the extent that they exceed 7.5% of your AGI, timing your payments may be beneficial. If you know you're not going to reach the 7.5% limitation this year, try holding off paying any medical bills or scheduling medical exams and procedures until the following year. If you're close to or already over the threshold, see what you can do to increase the deduction. Be sure to pay any outstanding medical bills, including health insurance premiums, by Dec. 31. Consider scheduling, being billed for and paying for elective medical and dental work before the end of the year. The same goes if you need new glasses, contact lenses, dentures, a hearing aid or modifications to a car to enable a disabled person to drive.