View Full Version : "too soon" to fill a prescription??


cecily_parish
07-24-09, 03:15 PM
OK so my doctor wrote me three prescriptions last time i met with him (two were post-dated) for 15 mg IR 2x/day, which had been working for me for a few months, but mid-way through the second prescription this time, i began to feel like the effects were wearing off way sooner than before. so i met with my doctor and he upped my dosage to 15 mg IR 3x/day.

Now, when i went to fill the prescription today, the pharmacist told me she couldn't fill it because it hasn't been 28 days since my last one was filled--even after i had explained to her that the dosage had been upped and that was why it was early, and that i wouldn't have enough to cover if i had to wait the normal month.

Has anyone else had a similar issue? Is this true, or should I try a different pharmacy? Why would my doctor have dated my script for today and post-dated the other two for one month and two months from today if i couldn't legally fill them??

Lukw10
07-24-09, 03:55 PM
The dosage actually has to be changed as in you need to received a different physical pill or formula, you cannot just go back for more of the same pill. You could probably get 2x20mg + 1x5mg from your doctor but not just more of the same dose (15mg). Or just wait the extra ~2 days and get the 3x15mg. You are technically filling the same exact pill.

LittlePrincess
07-24-09, 04:19 PM
I'm actually surprised by this, especially since the script was from the same doctor. The pharmacist should be able to fill it... IF it is a different prescription, meaning that the dose and/or frequency (daily total dose) changed. For example, 15mgs twice/daily = 60 tab script vs. 15mgs 3 times/daily = 90 tab script.

Even though they are both the 15mg tabs, these are both very different prescriptions. Did you doctor indeed write you this different prescription or did he just give you an "extra" prescription written exactly what you had before? (hope that makes sense ;))

Only other thing I can think of is maybe it's an insurance issue? or a state DEA law? or perhaps this particular pharmacy? Not sure :confused:

Also - How soon did you try to fill the new prescription?

cecily_parish
07-24-09, 04:26 PM
It's been like 19 days, so I do have pills left still, but if I start the x3 today, I won't have enough for the full 28 days...

And I get that it's the same "pill," but like LittlePrincess said, it's a very different prescription, and it's written by the same doctor, so it's obvious I'm not someone who is going around to different docs to get multiple prescriptions or something... I was kind of in a rush because I was on my way to work so I couldn't really talk to them, so maybe I'll call the pharmacy later to see what exactly the problem was.

Lukw10
07-24-09, 04:32 PM
The pharmacy, even when they are wrong, will always trust their own employees "knowledge" before the random "drug seeking" customer. Fortunately you have a paid medical advocate, your doctor, let him do the talking and you'll find that it may just work out in your favor.

cecily_parish
07-24-09, 05:13 PM
So do you know if there is a law against this (not filling a second prescription, even if it's given by the same doctor, within a certain period)?? Or is this just the pharmacist making a "judgement call"?

pADDyjay
07-24-09, 06:46 PM
just call your doctor ... a new dose means a new script...this was my experience when I was first starting out on adhd meds over 14yrs ago.

My dose was adjusted quite a few times and my doc also tried different meds

good luck to you and keep us posted ...we really care:)

Lukw10
07-24-09, 07:37 PM
So do you know if there is a law against this (not filling a second prescription, even if it's given by the same doctor, within a certain period)?? Or is this just the pharmacist making a "judgement call"?


didn't you say that it has already been 28 days..? frankly, just wait the ~2 or whatever days left, like its not worth the work just for an extra day. I do believe that even though it is a "new prescription" it is still for the exact same pill (just more of them) meaning that you cannot fill prior to the 30 day cycle. I believe you have to literally be requesting a different physical pill to bypass both the pharmacy and insurance cycle.

novagal
07-24-09, 09:32 PM
Oh - wait a minute (I've read this like four times now) I see the problem. The script you tried to fill still has the previous dose on it. It's not written for the 15mg 3x/day, is this correct? If so, then as far as the pharmacy is concerned, you're still on your previous dose and therefore this is too early to fill it. You would have to have had a new prescription written for the new dose, and then you'd have been able to fill it.

(and I think other people may have already said this - sorry, my reading comprehension is miserable right now.....:o)

Imnapl
07-24-09, 09:39 PM
This exact same situation just happened to me this week except that the drug was Celebrex, an anti-inflammatory. My rheumatologist suggested I increase my dose, my doctor did not change the prescription, but my pharmacy continued to fill the prescriptions. I went in this week and was told that Pharmacare, a government agency in B.C. was tracking prescriptions of Celebrex and that I would have to get a new prescription. I can skip doses of Ritalin much easier than I can the inflammatory so I was pretty upset. I was lucky and got in to see my doctor the next morning and when I received my new bottle of pills, in big font on the label were the words ***DOSE INCREASED***. My mom has recently had the same difficulty with not being able to fill a prescription for blood pressure meds even a day early when she happens to be in the store. She asked if the government thought she was hoarding them.

Imnapl
07-24-09, 09:43 PM
Novagal wins the kewpie doll.

For the repetitive post police: I posted before reading Novagal's reply. :p

pADDyjay
07-24-09, 11:01 PM
Oh - wait a minute (I've read this like four times now) I see the problem. The script you tried to fill still has the previous dose on it. It's not written for the 15mg 3x/day, is this correct? If so, then as far as the pharmacy is concerned, you're still on your previous dose and therefore this is too early to fill it. You would have to have had a new prescription written for the new dose, and then you'd have been able to fill it.

(and I think other people may have already said this - sorry, my reading comprehension is miserable right now.....:o)

thanks for validating my post...I thought thats what I wrote...."New Dose Means New Script"...right?....thanks again nova

novagal
07-24-09, 11:56 PM
...I thought thats what I wrote...."New Dose Means New Script"...right?....

exactly! :)


(and I think other people may have already said this - sorry, my reading comprehension is miserable right now.....:o)

I knew it was there somewhere - I think I just got so excited that I wrapped my mind around the OP.......:o

Imnapl
07-25-09, 12:07 AM
Where are the repeat post police when you need them? :o

Patty, I totally missed your post.

FinallyAnswered
07-25-09, 01:44 AM
OK so my doctor wrote me three prescriptions last time i met with him (two were post-dated) for 15 mg IR 2x/day, which had been working for me for a few months, but mid-way through the second prescription this time, i began to feel like the effects were wearing off way sooner than before. so i met with my doctor and he upped my dosage to 15 mg IR 3x/day.

Now, when i went to fill the prescription today, the pharmacist told me she couldn't fill it because it hasn't been 28 days since my last one was filled--even after i had explained to her that the dosage had been upped and that was why it was early, and that i wouldn't have enough to cover if i had to wait the normal month.

Has anyone else had a similar issue? Is this true, or should I try a different pharmacy? Why would my doctor have dated my script for today and post-dated the other two for one month and two months from today if i couldn't legally fill them??

Not sure what the rules are in the UK, but here in the states, the pharmacist can refuse to fill the new script until the last one filled has run its course according to the original script's dosing instructions.

Their reasoning is that the NEW script is for 3 pills a day and that's fine. However, your old script was for two pills a day and that's what you should have been taking, according to the powers that be.

You should have your doctor talk to the pharmacist and tell her that he upped your dosage mid-script and he's okaying an early refill. However, that still may not work because the pharmacist is the person who has the last word, because they are responsible for dispensing the medication and have to bear legal consequences if they "bend the rules".

Good luck!

Imnapl
07-25-09, 02:35 AM
Not sure what the rules are in the UK, but here in the states, the pharmacist can refuse to fill the new script until the last one filled has run its course according to the original script's dosing instructions.

Their reasoning is that the NEW script is for 3 pills a day and that's fine. However, your old script was for two pills a day and that's what you should have been taking, according to the powers that be.This is illogical. If you have a life threatening disease and a doctor increases your dose by writing a new prescription, you are expected to continue using up your old prescription and risk serious illness or even death? I hope some other people in the USA check on this and report back.

pADDyjay
07-25-09, 02:37 AM
Where are the repeat post police when you need them? :o

Patty, I totally missed your post.


:) no worries...adhd at work...:)

FinallyAnswered
07-25-09, 02:40 AM
This is illogical. If you have a life threatening disease and a doctor increases your dose by writing a new prescription, you are expected to continue using up your old prescription and risk serious illness or even death? I hope some other people in the USA check on this and report back.

Well, I would think that if you had a life-threatening condition, your doctor would call the pharmacist and explain it to them so you could bypass the bureaucratic red tape.

However, we are not talking about "life-saving" medication. We are talking about a highly-controlled narcotic with a long history of abuse attached to it. It isn't necessary for survival, but can cause death when abused. It is for this very reason they are required to adhere to a script until a doctor orders a change to that current script, not the one following it.

Imnapl
07-25-09, 02:54 AM
Sorry, hon, you're missing the point of this thread. I really am interested in what your pharmacist would do in this situation.

pADDyjay
07-25-09, 02:59 AM
My experience with being a recipient of prescribed meds has been if the

dose or the medication is changed before the original script is finished, the
doctor has to write a new script for new meds...

no matter how many are left it the bottle and I used to try to bring the unused meds back...you keep them or dispose of them

The only problem I encountered after that was getting reembursed from my insurance.. or inappropriate remarks from pharmacists like Now what

Another script...and other snide comments Ive been subjected to for the last 14plus yrs

FinallyAnswered
07-25-09, 03:21 AM
My experience with being a recipient of prescribed meds has been if the

dose or the medication is changed before the original script is finished, the
doctor has to write a new script for new meds...

no matter how many are left it the bottle and I used to try to bring the unused meds back...you keep them or dispose of them

The only problem I encountered after that was getting reembursed from my insurance.. or inappropriate remarks from pharmacists like Now what

Another script...and other snide comments Ive been subjected to for the last 14plus yrs

Yup....been there done that. Pharmacists are a lot more lenient with schedule III-V medications, because they have a lower abuse potential than do schedule II meds.

Here's the Pharmacist's perspective though....(I am role playing now...lol).

"We have to keep all prescriptions on file for a period of 5 years. We are required to keep a separate pile of schedule II medication prescriptions, in chronological order, for the same 5 year period. This is routinely audited by the DEA and state agencies."

"If you present a script for 60 Adderall at 2x per day, that is a 30-day supply. If 19 days later you present another script for 90 Adderall at 3x per day, I am not allowed by law to fill it unless it is accompanied by a typed, signed note, on the Physician's letterhead authorizing the dosage change."

"If I fill the new script without that written authorization, there is now a big hole in my record keeping. Because the scripts MUST be kept in chronological order, the inspectors can now see that I dispensed 90 additional Adderall to a patient who should still have 11 days worth based on the prior script."

"Since I have no backing documentation from the prescribing physician on a dosage change for this patient, I am now completely responsible and subject to disciplinary action, not excluding suspension or loss of license"

(I wouldn't risk my livelihood.....and I wouldn't expect them to do it for me either)

There.....that's my "Viewpoint from the middle" rant for the day. :D

PinK~Cloud
07-25-09, 04:13 AM
it's a schedule 2 drug. thats why.

Lukw10
07-25-09, 11:08 AM
However, we are not talking about "life-saving" medication. We are talking about a highly-controlled narcotic with a long history of abuse attached to it.


You were pretty much right about everything else you wrote in this thread except for the narcotic bit. Adderall is NOT a narcotic technically speaking.

FinallyAnswered
07-25-09, 11:14 AM
You were pretty much right about everything else you wrote in this thread except for the narcotic bit. Adderall is NOT a narcotic technically speaking.

Nope.....but most people associate schedule II's with narcotic pain killers, so Adderall gets lumped in as a victim of medicinal profiling....:D

Imnapl
07-25-09, 08:21 PM
Here's the Pharmacist's perspective though....(I am role playing now...lol).

"We have to keep all prescriptions on file for a period of 5 years. We are required to keep a separate pile of schedule II medication prescriptions, in chronological order, for the same 5 year period. This is routinely audited by the DEA and state agencies."

"If you present a script for 60 Adderall at 2x per day, that is a 30-day supply. If 19 days later you present another script for 90 Adderall at 3x per day, I am not allowed by law to fill it unless it is accompanied by a typed, signed note, on the Physician's letterhead authorizing the dosage change."

"If I fill the new script without that written authorization, there is now a big hole in my record keeping. Because the scripts MUST be kept in chronological order, the inspectors can now see that I dispensed 90 additional Adderall to a patient who should still have 11 days worth based on the prior script."

"Since I have no backing documentation from the prescribing physician on a dosage change for this patient, I am now completely responsible and subject to disciplinary action, not excluding suspension or loss of license"

(I wouldn't risk my livelihood.....and I wouldn't expect them to do it for me either)

There.....that's my "Viewpoint from the middle" rant for the day. :DSo this is what your pharmacist told you when you phoned him regarding this issue or is it just more conjecture / opinion?

Imnapl
07-25-09, 08:26 PM
Nope.....but most people associate schedule II's with narcotic pain killers, so Adderall gets lumped in as a victim of medicinal profiling....:DSo why is an anti-inflammatory and blood pressure med treated the same way regarding new dosage = new prescription? :confused:

Imnapl
07-25-09, 08:56 PM
Nope.....but most people associate schedule II's with narcotic pain killers, so Adderall gets lumped in as a victim of medicinal profiling....:DCertified or licensed pharmasists are this casual about drug categories? :confused:

cecily_parish
07-27-09, 08:52 AM
Thanks for all the responses!

I'm still not sure what to do, and I still have enough meds left for a few more days, but not until the end of the month, if I continue on with the new directions of 3x/day... So I'll probably go back to the pharmacy tomorrow or the day after, close to when I actually NEED the prescription, and if they still have an issue I'll have them phone my doctor directly.

cecily_parish
07-27-09, 10:39 AM
Sorry for the double post, but as an update for anyone who might experience this...

I called a local, independently owned pharmacy and explained the situation to the pharmacist there and she said that the pharmacy where I typically fill my prescriptions should DEFINITELY fill the new one if there's a dose change. She said it would have to be the same pharmacy because they're the only ones who would be able to look at the records and see that there is, in fact, a dose change. I knew I should've just dealt with them all along, instead of Walgreens. :rolleyes:

Imnapl
07-27-09, 11:10 AM
Sorry for the double post, but as an update for anyone who might experience this...

I called a local, independently owned pharmacy and explained the situation to the pharmacist there and she said that the pharmacy where I typically fill my prescriptions should DEFINITELY fill the new one if there's a dose change. She said it would have to be the same pharmacy because they're the only ones who would be able to look at the records and see that there is, in fact, a dose change. I knew I should've just dealt with them all along, instead of Walgreens. :rolleyes:I'm glad you got that sorted out. I'm not sure what the situation is in the USA, but there is a shortage of pharmacists where I live. With an aging population, most pharmacies are very busy and process many prescriptions. If one only has the occasional prescription, you might never experience an error or feel you need to scrutinize what the doctor writes and what the pharmacist fills. In my country, government agencies change medical coverage and regulations regularly. It's a lot to keep up with and mistakes happen.

pADDyjay
07-27-09, 01:13 PM
I contacted the pharmacy at the hospital where I work and got the same reponse.

New dose = new prescription, very simple...

Unfortunatly some of us adhdrs monthly pharmacy visits can be so unpleasant and time consuming. its like a part time job......

and to be insulted and yes humiliated in the waiting area of the by some pharmacys...is just unacceptable....

I can imagine that chronic pain pts.. go through the same ordeal trying to

get their legitimate oxy script filled...

take care...pADDyjay

cecily_parish
07-27-09, 04:07 PM
and for a final update, they did fill the prescription (albeit, pretty obviously begrudgingly:rolleyes:) after calling my doctor and speaking to him directly... a week earlier than the 28 days.