View Full Version : Headache from quitting coffee...


wesley
07-24-09, 04:02 PM
2nd day into 10mg XR.

I had a massive headache earlier, then it occurred to me... I was drinking two-four cups of coffee a day and I now I don't really have the urge. What if its the lack of coffee?

So I waited until the Adderall leveled out a bit and drank a half-cup of coffee and *poof*... the headache was gone.

Lukw10
07-24-09, 04:05 PM
Don't give in, caffeine addiction is a real thing (although fairly mild as they go) and you will probably be grouchy and have headaches (maybe even shakes) for the first couple days but trust me caffeine is garbage and definitely worth kicking. I know because my friend is a total caffeine addict and if he doesn't get his "fix" then he gets all those symptoms until hes weaned off completely.

adsx8888
07-29-09, 06:05 PM
it took me two weeks before the caffeine withdrawal was gone. You might want to try to wean off (take a couple and a half for a week then a cup the next week and so on)

DesertDave
07-29-09, 11:43 PM
I quit caffeine about 18 months ago. And I drank LOTS of coffee.

I had a mild headache for about 2 weeks. Not devastating or like a migraine but it was there.

After quitting caffeine, my ADHD issues skyrocketed. lol

Sknipper
07-30-09, 04:51 PM
Good luck, stick with it!

I can't stand coffee, but I was a big Mountain Dew drinker. If I would accidentally run out, I would get the biggest headaches I've ever had. It made me feel so sick. I've tried to quit on purpose a few times now and usually give in and go back.

Actually right now, my last one was Tuesday, so I'm 2 days out and I've been feeling pretty bad but I'm trying to make myself stick with it. I have bad teeth and fat I can't get off, and I know it's all from being a pop addict.

One thing I had considered before but ended up not doing was to use caffeine pills to wean down from it. For me, it is a big deal to break the flavor association. Going from drinking cups of neon colored high fructose corn syrup to just plain water is hard enough of a change, that I thought managing the headaches until I got past the urge for the taste of it would be a good way to quit.

Retromancer
07-30-09, 07:33 PM
So tell me again why I want to stop drinking coffee? (Especially since I neither wear full-length underwear or live in the state of Utah? [Involuntary shudder])

Is there a point to this thread?

APSJ
07-30-09, 09:01 PM
I don't take adderall, so can't speak to the interaction between it and coffee, but as for coffee generally, I'm a big fan, and and have yet to see anything to convince me its bad for me. I do get awful headaches if I don't drink coffee in the morning, but I've found I can easily avoid these by always drinking coffee in the morning.

From an interesting article (http://archief.punt.nl/index.php?r=1&id=270175&tbl_archief=)on the health effects of caffeine in general, and coffee in particular:

True, there are mountains of papers linking caffeine to all manner of health problems. But once you start digging, caffeine's critics don't have much going for them beyond an almost religious zeal to demonise the stuff. In fact, recent evidence suggests they are dead wrong. Caffeine, it turns out, has a multitude of health benefits. So much so that if most of us weren't drinking it already you could argue the case for adding it to the water supply.Caffeine supporters, however, aren't content with merely countering the critics. Over the past few years they have quietly been building the case that coffee, at least, is positively bursting with healthfulness. Nearly two dozen studies, for example, now show that coffee drinkers have a 25 per cent reduced risk of colorectal cancer, Coughlin says. And the more coffee you drink, the lower the risk.

In addition, several studies have shown reduced risk of liver cancer among coffee drinkers, as well as lower incidence of Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. There are even some tentative findings that caffeine may help stave off Alzheimer's disease, as well as alcohol-related liver damage. And lest you think the coffee industry or other interested parties funded the studies, these results were by-products of large, multi-purpose cohort studies such as the Nurses' Health Study, administered by Willett under a grant from the US National Institutes of Health.

Willett has also found that coffee reduces the risk of kidney stones. Drinking a lot of any liquid has a similar effect, but coffee is particularly beneficial, probably due to its diuretic effect. Also, he says, coffee lowers the risk of gallstones and, intriguingly, suicide. "Probably coffee is a mild antidepressant, and for some people it's just enough to pull them back from the brink," says Willett.

With such favourable press for coffee, why does caffeine keep on getting it in the neck? Kroger believes that, in part, the problem stems from young researchers trying to make names for themselves. The temptation is to feed massive amounts of a common substance such as caffeine to rats and see what happens. If the rats get sick, it's news.

Retromancer
07-31-09, 12:48 AM
APSJ my coffee drinkin' buddy!

... as for coffee generally, I'm a big fan, and and have yet to see anything to convince me its bad for me. I do get awful headaches if I don't drink coffee in the morning, but I've found I can easily avoid these by always drinking coffee in the morning.

doiadhd
07-31-09, 01:00 AM
I have actually recieved the urge to get a cup of the good stuff due to this fred and a mild headache on the left hand side.

fxfake
07-31-09, 05:25 PM
So tell me again why I want to stop drinking coffee? (Especially since I neither wear full-length underwear or live in the state of Utah? [Involuntary shudder])

One reason is that it's far more effective if you don't use it all the time. A single cup of coffee is an excellent (at least effective) way to stay awake when necessary. However, if you're downing a many cups a day, it does not work as well.

I've found that tapering off of caffeine is a lot easier with caffeine pills (or Cola) than coffee, as the dose in coffee is highly variable and hard to control.

Retromancer
07-31-09, 05:54 PM
Not all of us drink coffee as a form of self-medication. For some of us it is part of the morning ritual. For me it's part of my "negotiated settlement" in the morning. I will have my morning coffee, I will check out the morning's news -- aka "the morning dose o' doom". I don't care who you are or how important you think you are. I am not rushing out the door until I do this.

A dispatch from the "I work to live, I don't live to work" faction...

One reason is that it's far more effective if you don't use it all the time. A single cup of coffee is an excellent (at least effective) way to stay awake when necessary. However, if you're downing a many cups a day, it does not work as well.

I've found that tapering off of caffeine is a lot easier with caffeine pills (or Cola) than coffee, as the dose in coffee is highly variable and hard to control.

fxfake
08-01-09, 05:47 PM
Not all of us drink coffee as a form of self-medication. For some of us it is part of the morning ritual. For me it's part of my "negotiated settlement" in the morning.

A deal with the... ? ;)

Unless headaches and other caffeine withdrawal symptoms do not bother you at all, if you drink coffee every morning, you are most likely drinking it as a form of self-medication (for the withdrawal symptoms). Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Retromancer
08-01-09, 06:38 PM
A deal with the relentlessly hurried, workaday world. Just think of me as a member of the 'Slow Mornings' movement...

No I do not get headaches if I skip my coffee. I simply enjoy it in the morning. Imagine that!

Coffee is one of the pleasant constants in my life. When we would go over to visit my grandmother, there inevitably would be a pot of coffee waiting on the stove...

A deal with the... ? ;)

Unless headaches and other caffeine withdrawal symptoms do not bother you at all, if you drink coffee every morning, you are most likely drinking it as a form of self-medication (for the withdrawal symptoms). Not that there's anything wrong with that.

APSJ
08-02-09, 12:35 PM
One reason is that it's far more effective if you don't use it all the time. A single cup of coffee is an excellent (at least effective) way to stay awake when necessary. However, if you're downing a many cups a day, it does not work as well.


This is true. Someone who doesn't drink coffee regularly will get far more of a boost from a cup of coffee than someone who does. The thing is, if you do drink it regularly, you can get the same effect by just drinking more than you normally do. For example, I always have a cup of coffee in the morning. If I'm particularly tired on a given morning, I'll have two or three cups(or just one really big cup).

fxfake
08-02-09, 12:45 PM
This is true. Someone who doesn't drink coffee regularly will get far more of a boost from a cup of coffee than someone who does. The thing is, if you do drink it regularly, you can get the same effect by just drinking more than you normally do. For example, I always have a cup of coffee in the morning. If I'm particularly tired on a given morning, I'll have two or three cups(or just one really big cup).

True, but at higher doses you start to get other bad effects that do not appear at lower doses. While one may develop tolerance to the stimulant effects, one may not (I don't really know) develop similar tolerance to all of the less desirable effects (e.g. diuresis, nausea, etc.).

APSJ
08-04-09, 02:59 AM
True, but at higher doses you start to get other bad effects that do not appear at lower doses. While one may develop tolerance to the stimulant effects, one may not (I don't really know) develop similar tolerance to all of the less desirable effects (e.g. diuresis, nausea, etc.).

That hasn't been the case in my experience, and I have gone through periods where I drank an awful lot more coffee than I do now. I've actually never experienced those effects from caffeine. I wonder if its more an issue with caffeine pills?