View Full Version : Depression and waking up in the morning


astronaut
10-06-09, 05:34 AM
One of the places that my depression screws with my day the most is in the morning. If I can get up and get some coffee and adderall, I'm fine. But the first few seconds, as my alarm goes off, are the worst. They may only last a literal few seconds, but they are horrible and can mean the difference between getting up now and getting up three hours from now. Does anyone else have this problem?

I feel like there's a threshold - a place where sheer willpower buckles and isn't enough. The trick is to train my mind and body to raise that threshold as far as I can. But this is just *$%^%ing ridiculous. I'm usually a high-energy, feel-good kinda guy, but in those first few moments as my alarm goes off, I don't care about the world, about life, school, work, money, responsibilities, fun, video games, chess, Stephen Hawking books.....I mean, John Stuart Mill of his own free will couldn't get me up.

I've never been a morning person, but the last few years in college have really gotten crazy. I used to be able to sit, relax, and focus before bed. That would help me jump right up at the first instant my buzzer would go off. And now? Now I don't even know it's my alarm. My cell phone gets worked into my dreams, as does my alarm clock itself. Half the time I don't even know it's there and the other half I would rather die of snorting syanide with shards of glass than get up.

Has anyone had any good fortune with finding a remedy against this?

Billy79
10-06-09, 07:23 AM
i think maybe thats pretty common? Not quite as hard you describe it though. I mean for half an hour or one in the start. I hate everything and dont find ANY meaning during the morning. so i try not to think at all, and usually wears off...

Driver
10-06-09, 07:41 AM
This is a major problem for me. Once I'm up, I'm fine, but on some days it take me hours to get out of bed. It seems all my brain wants to do is sleep: I'm unable to think of reasons to get out of bed.

Multiple alarms, cell-phone reminders, fancy alarm clocks, alarm clocks on the other side of the room, etc do not work. I'm almost to the point where I'm willing to hire someone to come into my bedroom when my alarm goes off, throw open the curtains and then engage me in a conversation to wake up my brain.

astronaut
10-06-09, 07:43 AM
i think maybe thats pretty common? Not quite as hard you describe it though. I mean for half an hour or one in the start. I hate everything and dont find ANY meaning during the morning. so i try not to think at all, and usually wears off...

Yeah, I know what you mean. For me, it's like what some scientists write about the big bang - it all worked itself out later on (here we are) but they'll focus on what all the matter was doing in the first three seconds after it all exploded. I see my morning self like that: it's what happens in the first few seconds that matters. My problem is that I want to have more control over myself that early. I mean, I want to see the sun rise without having to stay up all night!

astronaut
10-06-09, 07:49 AM
This is a major problem for me. Once I'm up, I'm fine, but on some days it take me hours to get out of bed. It seems all my brain wants to do is sleep: I'm unable to think of reasons to get out of bed.

Multiple alarms, cell-phone reminders, fancy alarm clocks, alarm clocks on the other side of the room, etc do not work. I'm almost to the point where I'm willing to hire someone to come into my bedroom when my alarm goes off, throw open the curtains and then engage me in a conversation to wake up my brain.

That is exactly what I'm talking about! Sometimes one of my friends calls me, but I don't even hear the phone ring anymore. I'm thinking about trying out some of those computer alarm clock programs. The kind that can play music files at a specific time. I wouldn't even have to play music, though. I could set some stand-up comedy, the audio track to The Matrix, or something really, REALLY annoying....which is hard for me, because I don't get annoyed easily. I guess it would have to be Barney, Reality TV, or Hannah Montana to meet the criteria....:rolleyes: I think I may have a new idea!

astronaut
10-07-09, 05:35 PM
Well, after I started this thread the other night, I downloaded a program called Alarm Clock Pro. I set it to play a stand up comedy album I have on iTunes...and it worked! But when I tried it this morning, I immediately felt like my brain was starting to adapt and get way too comfortable with it. Maybe I should put a really diverse set of files on the playlist and set it to random. That way it's completely different every time.

Also, a friend of mine told me about this alarm clock on wheels. When it goes off, it runs around your floor, so you have to get up and chase it to get it to turn off...think of it as a Roomba with a buzzer.

But I did some looking around, and I found these very unique alarm clocks on ThinkGeek.com, that just might work for some of us with more alarm clock issues than we can shake a stick at.

Snuz N Luz Wifi Donation Alarm Clock (http://www.thinkgeek.com/stuff/41/snuznluz.shtml) - Be forced to donate money to a non=profit organization you hate when you don't get up.

Epoch Alarm Clock (http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/a7c5/) - The time is in binary, hexidecimal or something else, so you never really know for sure what time it is unless you learn to read in that language.

[/URL][URL="http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/9bac/"]Neverlate Executive Alarm Clock (http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/ac3f/) - An alarm clock with more features than you could ever use...and it can play mp3's!

Neverlate 7-day Alarm Clock (http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/788e/)- Similar to the Executive Alarm Clock but with different features.

Clocky Robotic Alarm (http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/91f2/) - A Roomba with a buzzer. Chase it to turn it off.

Driver
10-07-09, 07:28 PM
I tried the find 'n' fetch alarm clocks: didn't work. I'd simply get up, turn it off and then jump into bed. Also those style of alarm clocks tend to run on batteries...which I tend to forget to replace or recharge (because once I leave the bedroom, the problem of 'no batteries' quickly leaves my memory).

What I'm currently trialling is a bedside lamp with a 48W (160W equiv.) CFL 5000K bulb in it: it's f-king bright (approx. 2500 lumens), and gives off a natural daylight white colour.

I've also ordered an electric oil burner: I'm going to try burning peppermint or eucalyptus oil in the morning to awaken my brain. I might even try some strong mints too.

astronaut
10-07-09, 11:06 PM
Hmm....the electric oil burner definitely sounds like a good idea. I think I'm going to look into that.

redhills
10-07-09, 11:19 PM
Can advise only one thing - try to keep yoursdelf busy and you'll not have any time for depression.

astronaut
10-07-09, 11:49 PM
Now I'm just wondering what are some really crazy cool, wicked awesomely-annoying tracks I can play so I will have no choice but to suffer or get up. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated, even if they are only on YouTube. I can extract the audio.

willwill30
10-11-09, 09:07 PM
What I'm currently trialling is a bedside lamp with a 48W (160W equiv.) CFL 5000K bulb in it: it's f-king bright (approx. 2500 lumens), and gives off a natural daylight white colour.



Is this the one that starts out dim, and then gradually gets brighter to simulate the sun rising? I think it's a great idea as long as it's not instantly bright, that would just make me mad.:D

Driver
10-11-09, 09:56 PM
Is this the one that starts out dim, and then gradually gets brighter to simulate the sun rising? I think it's a great idea as long as it's not instantly bright, that would just make me mad.:D

Insta-bright. And it didn't work today. :mad:

Slept through 3 alarms and 2 phone calls....

attic
10-13-09, 06:26 AM
Yeah, I can't wake myself up. All I wanna do when I hear the alarm clock go off is sleep. When I'm up later, I get so mad at myself for sleeping all day. But when the time comes to actually wake up, I have a different mindset. It sucks. I'm lame.

Driver
10-13-09, 06:01 PM
I've so far had some measurable success by doping myself up to the eyeballs at about 9pm and going to bed. It's made getting up somewhat easier.

astronaut
10-15-09, 04:42 AM
Okay, so here's the arrangement I've been using for a whole week: I have three alarms - my cell phone, alarm clock, and then Alarm Clock Pro on my desktop computer. Alarm Clock Pro goes off first, playing The Clash (If you don't listen to them, as I didn't before, I think they are excellent for something like this...they're not too loud, and their psuedo-reggae derivative sounds make waking up to hard rock much more welcoming to the ears). In order to turn the music off, I have to get up, walk over to my computer, turn on the monitor, and only then i can either exit or hit snooze. Within five minutes, my cell phone and regular alarm clock go off on opposite sides of the room. At this point, it's basically my normal two-alarm-clock arrangement, but what makes it all work a lot better is the computer - I can play absolutely whatever I want. In fact, Alarm Clock Pro does everything from turning the screensaver on/off (good if you password your screensaver and want to have to type in the password to ultimately exit the software) to adjusting the system volume, interfacing with your Address Book, working with iTunes, and everything else listed here (http://www.koingosw.com/products/alarmclockpro.php).

It has definitely made a difference so far. Now my challenge is to stay rather unfamiliar with The Clash to keep my brain from getting too comfortable with hearing their music.

girlwednesday
10-15-09, 11:29 AM
I struggle as well..the only thing that works for me is having something i care about more than myself. I have a 13 year old dog I love more than anything..I got her as a pup in university..she forces me to keep a routine. she is inflexible with the time she gets up to pee and eat.
The other thing I do is I will schedule a singing lesson in the am before I go to work. I LOVE my lessons and as hard as it is to get up and go, I will not miss my lesson.
Not sure if this is useful.. but it keeps me flowing through my day

Pyrrhic Victory
10-18-09, 10:52 AM
I woke up fine this morning but it's been a downward spiral the moment I got dressed.

Logic
10-18-09, 11:04 PM
I go through this routine most 'mornings', although my mornings soon become afternoons when I can't force myself to get up and not just roll over and get another 5 hours sleep for no good reason.

I can set alarms, buzzers, beepers, set the TV to turn on and arrange a wake up call, but all that does is annoy me until I unplug whatever is making noise and jump back under the covers, not give too much thought about the lecture I'm about to sleep through, or the e-mails I'll recieve telling me that my attendance is appaling, no thought to the potential consequence of excessive sleep.
All I know is, I work nights... bound to have dragged my carcass out of bed by then!

It's like I know and understand that I have important things to do, and I have absolutely no valid reason whatsoever for remaining in bed dozing for hours after my alarm went off and I ripped it's plug from the socket to silence it... but in the back of my mind I'm asking myself; 'Is it worth getting up, so somebody somewhere can tell me I'm an idiot today?'

Logic

sarek
10-19-09, 02:17 AM
'Is it worth getting up, so somebody somewhere can tell me I'm an idiot today?'

Logic

I think you got the key question right there. I find it a lot easier to wake up if I have something worthwhile to look forward to that day.

Cro-mag
10-21-09, 01:58 PM
I have had problems with depression and sometimes I would lay awake in the morning/afternoon almost paralyzed; or I would roll over and go back to sleep in a split second.

I found that I was hypoglyceamic which is a problem in the morning because it's been several hours since last eating. I also found I have an allergie to gluten which leaves me sluggish and drowsy. I suplement high potency vits with an onus on chromium and avoid gluten at all costs.

Depression is still a factor but when it comes I am not physically paralysed in the same way. The problem with this is that it can precipitate anger and aggression so the psycological elliment has to be attended to but I have more energy...

Angie
01-09-10, 03:22 PM
How do I deal with MD and ADD. Right now my life is basicly over, just started pristiq, and switched from adderallxr to concerta. I don't know how long I can hold.

leapofaith
01-09-10, 05:41 PM
Hi Angie, welcome to the forum!!:D

I am glad you reached our here for some support. Just from your short post I can tell you are close to or are at the bottom. You feel hopeless and alone. Your not finding pleasure in anything, including things you used to love. Am I right?

I have been there sweetie. Infact I just "got off the couch" a couple of months ago. I lived on my sofa for the better part of 2 years. I got up and took care of my kids and responsibilities. That was about it. I found NOTHING I did was very pleasurable. I wasn't singing in the shower or being my normal goofy self. The only time I smiled was when my boys were around, they have made me smile.


I have been on a antidepressant since I broke my back in 2003. I still suffered a full blown melt down in 2007. Shortly after, I was diagnosed with ADHD. It was a relief and made so much of my life make sense, it really fit.

Unfortunately the Psychiatrist who started me on medication didn't know much about ADD. He didn't offer any information on the medication or what to expect after being diagnosed.

I didn't know it at the time, but when we are diagnosed there is a brief moment of relief followed by the grief process. (posted a link below about grief process)


This process happens to all of us in some way, shape or form. Its different for every person, as the grief process is as personal as our finger prints. We all grieve in different ways.


I hope you give this some thought. I think, had someone told me about this, maybe I wouldn't have spent 2 years depressed and in denial. ?? Who knows.


I do know that antidepressants don't work overnight. Most people begin to start feeling its effects after 2 weeks. Some of the meds are not effective for 30 days. I hope you can find it in yourself to give the meds AND yourself a chance to begin the healing process.


This forum is a wonderful place to learn and find the kindness and support we ALL need and crave. Post here often, about anything. You will be surprised how many of us suffer and feel the same. I know it has been profoundly helpful in my beginning to accept my ADD and depression.

It has helped me find my strengths too. I have always thought that I would never find anything I was good at. I was doomed to be a "loser" forever.

Oh how wrong I was. It didn't happen over night, I am still learning and coping every day. But I am starting to see some joy enter my life again.



Angie, give your self the love and patience that you would to someone you loved if they were going through what you are. It can get better!


Take care, smile, even if you don't feel like it. They are contagious! Even if you have to fake it, til ya make it!!:D
http://www.drkevintblake.com/Grief.pdf