View Full Version : Bodybuilding and Fibromyalgia


Onwari
05-18-04, 08:14 AM
Hi all! I just would like to say that I have ADD and was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The doctor said that was all he could figure since he ran all kinds of tests and they showed nothing.

Before that, I have had like five surgeries on my hand to release my, in layman's terms, trigger finger. It is a funny name but it was excruciating. That is when your finger freezes inward toward your palm and it is extremely painful.

Anyway, now I have been battling bursitis in my right shoulder. I used to bodybuild during my trigger finger stage and I will tell you that things would have been ten times worse had I not been. I am trying to motivate myself again, but the shoulder requires the machines not free weights. I do 20 minutes of cardio after my workouts. Then I take a protein supplement to help with recovery.

In battling fibromyalgia, it has helped so much and I feel so much better. The fatigue was a HUGE problem with me too. The routine I am doing started helping that with my first workout and my insomnia is GONE.

Of course anyone should see their doctor before starting an excercise routine. Dani

Mary
05-31-04, 02:32 AM
Dani, I have restrictions...light excercises only! But glad you found something to help you!

Onwari
05-31-04, 10:52 PM
Hi Mary,

Unfortunately, I now have the same problem in my left wrist as I had in my right hand which required four surgeries to release different tendons. The left hand has required one surgery. The other night I awoke to the left wrist hurting so bad it almost made me throw up.

It has kept me awake now, on and off, for like two months so far. I cannot lift weights when it is like this. At least not using my left wrist.

My bursitis has not gone away in five months.

But...I can still get cardio in, although the other day I skipped it because my knee would not allow me to put pressure on it!

I hope I don't have to have surgery because of this. The pain feels the same. Just excruciating pain in my tendons. Sometimes it is in my muscles, but Motrin takes that pain away. For the tendons, medicine takes the edge off. It is not carpel tunnel, I have been tested for that. Heck, I have been tested for everything from rheumetoid athritis to lupus.

I have not weight trained since my wrist started up. At first I used a wrist brace and lifted like that. It worked for awhile, then one morning, my wrist gave me excruciating pain. No matter what position I placed it in, I was in severe pain. Pain so bad all I could do was lay there with my eyes closed, meditating until the pain pills took the edge off. It was downhill from there.

I will get back in time. I am really afraid of being like my grandmother who couldn't walk anymore at 60.

Do you have tendon disorders, or is it something else? It is really interesting how this fibromyalgia works. I am forever researching.

How many summers old are you Mary? I am 39 summers old. Some mornings I feel like I am 60 summers old.

The gym keeps me going so far. The doctor is watching me to see how I am doing....

Andi
07-03-04, 04:41 PM
I don't know how radical either of you are but if traditional exercise causes problems then I would suggest a more ancient form...Chi Kung is a very good way to burn the lactic acid that builds on the muscles and is purported to cause the aches and pains that we experience. Chi Kung is a series of positions or stretches in conjunction with breathing exercises that allows blood flow to the muscles and can be very stimulating...you'll break more of a sweat than you realize. For more information: http://qi-journal.com/Qigong.asp?-token.SearchID=QigongFAQ

Breathacizing has been a fad that many have had success with but is based on the Chi Kung technique...searching for either online may help you find a new regime.

Andi
07-03-04, 04:41 PM
Oooooh, and don't forget about aqua aerobics...a hot steamy pool accompained by the stretches and movements associated with the program can be very beneficial.

Onwari
07-03-04, 09:14 PM
Thank you! I will try!

Andi
03-13-05, 10:11 PM
Strength training curbed pain of fibromyalgia

BY RHODA FUKUSHIMA

Pioneer Press


When Claire Lewis of St. Paul was 39, she went roller skating with friends at Lake Calhoun. Though she wasn't a rookie skater, she fell, breaking her wrist. It took a year to heal; even after, she never felt quite right. Over the years, she was in a lot of pain. She didn't sleep well. Some mornings, she wasn't sure she could even get out of bed. In 1993, she finally got a diagnosis. She was 43.

"It's difficult for me to share that I really hurt. I tend to make light of it. During a physical, I said, 'My knees are killing me.' (My family doctor) said it might be a touch of arthritis. I saw a rheumatologist. He diagnosed it in 10 minutes as fibromyalgia. It was a relief. At least, I had something to call it. I knew the pain wasn't in my head.

"Then I was very depressed. I can remember thinking, I might feel this bad in my 80s, but I can't live like this for another 40-50 years.

"I went on an anti-depressant and gained 35 pounds in less than six months. I didn't think it really helped me much with the pain.

"I realized I'd become very isolated. I couldn't run and play with my friends as I had in the past. I was in the process of blending a family (with my husband's).

"I finally decided take control of myself. I thought the best thing to do was to get myself to a gym. I decided to find a partner to help me get better. That's where Dennis (Gudim) came in. I had a training session with him at the YWCA in St. Paul. This was 1998.

"I had never done strength training. I would tend to push myself too far, too fast. Dennis took it in small steps, but it was more than my rheumatologist suggested. I started working out with Dennis three times a week. It was a difficult decision. Financially, it felt extravagant (Gudim charges $40 per session for a 10-pack series). I decided to think of it as doctor's appointments. Exercise is what keeps me functioning.

"I've been with him ever since. It doesn't get boring because he changes it up. Once in a while, I think, 'Do I have to keep doing this?' As soon as I stop or cut back, I always end up regretting it. I don't feel as good. I start hurting. I lose ground.

"In 2003, I saw an allergist who asked if I would look at my diet. I have backed off eating wheat and sugar. I have a little more energy. The nice thing about that is I lost 30 pounds.

"All of this has made me a lot more compassionate. Fibromyalgia is one of those things you can't see. You don't look sick. I have learned that a lot of people have things going on that you don't know about."

Have you turned the corner toward good health? If so, we want to hear your story. Please e-mail your ideas to rgfukushima@pioneerpress.com, call Rhoda Fukushima at 651-228-5444, or mail them to Turning Point, c/o Rhoda Fukushima, 345 Cedar St., St. Paul, MN 55101.


http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/11054106.htm

QueensU_girl
09-18-07, 02:34 PM
Thanks for this great article.

I keep telling this to my Mom (age 67), but she seems to just be emotionally and physically "paralyzed" about trying anything NEW as an Intervention/Tool for her chronic pain.

Obviously she cannot do things like load bearing exercises (slipped disc), but a lot of Nautilus and Universal machines have some exercises, etc don't require that the spine or joints weight bear much at all.

If she avoids stuff like squats with weights, she'd be fine.

The misconception is to confuse competitive "weightlifting" (goal: lift as much as possible) with "weight training" or bodybuilding.

A bad back or painful body will almost always improve with muscle toning/strengthening.