View Full Version : types of learning disabilties and their history


excel
10-22-09, 12:41 PM
What are the different types of learning disabilties and when did they become known to the world? What do we know that we dodn't know 40 years ago?

excel
10-23-09, 09:56 PM
How much information was out their 45 five years ago about learning disabilties and types of disabilties have they come up in the lat ten years?

excel
11-17-09, 08:16 PM
adhd goes back at lest 100 years

dormammau2008
11-20-09, 09:39 PM
i think it gose back alot longer but the condtions then where diff and still worker to our befit now they dont,..... dorm

meadd823
11-24-09, 11:08 AM
I won't mention the irony of asking a bunch of ADD dyslexics to google some thing.

LD Online - time line of learning disabilities (http://www.ldonline.org/article/11244)

chips
11-24-09, 11:11 AM
I must say that i would have thought that would have found a more simple word than dsylexic to explain the condition. I never can get the spelling right for the life of me! Seriously!

Crazygirl79
11-24-09, 09:57 PM
I have dyscaucalia along with spatial awareness and eye hand coordination difficulties.

Selena

excel
11-24-09, 10:04 PM
I have dyscaucalia along with spatial awareness and eye hand coordination difficulties.

Selena
I have minimal brain damage, adhd, learning disabilties, Don't know what they are, Hand eye cordnation problems and anxiety

meadd823
11-25-09, 08:09 AM
I must say that i would have thought that would have found a more simple word than dsylexic to explain the condition. I never can get the spelling right for the life of me! Seriously!


Oh probably because I actually am dyslexic and spell checkers do a lot of the spelling for me other wise few people would be able to read my post

chips
11-25-09, 09:33 AM
Oh probably because I actually am dyslexic and spell checkers do a lot of the spelling for me other wise few people would be able to read my post


I have phonetic dsylexia, learning disabilities, communication disabilities & a poor reader but also struggle with typing correctly at times. Everytime I type something I have to read through it all to make I haven't left out words, put wrongs words, mixed up the spelling etc.

As I have fews times just posting this!!!

Spellcheckers are a godsend!! :)

excel
12-13-09, 04:21 PM
I can't get my bran and my hands to work together when I type. When I write I have a hard time putting my thoughts down on paper to where they make sense. I have witters block. When I read a chapter of a book, I have a hard time summiering it. Higher math is a problem for me too.

excel
06-09-10, 02:44 PM
what do we know today that we didn't know 40 years ago

excel
07-06-10, 09:17 AM
I have phonetic dsylexia, learning disabilities, communication disabilities & a poor reader but also struggle with typing correctly at times. Everytime I type something I have to read through it all to make I haven't left out words, put wrongs words, mixed up the spelling etc.

As I have fews times just posting this!!!

Spellcheckers are a godsend!! :)
typing is a struggle for too. hand eye cordination

excel
07-06-10, 01:05 PM
I have no visual memory, slow prcessing speed, concentation problems, slow reading and hand eye cordination problems. What can be done that they could't do twenty years ago

meadd823
07-06-10, 02:39 PM
what do we know today that we didn't know 40 years ago

A lot

There is more than one type of dyslexia - some dyslexics use the same areas of the brain to read as non-dyslexics where as others use vastly different areas of the brain when reading.

Those of us who by-pass traditional left hemispheric areas and engage areas in the non-verbal right hemisphere are able to read better than those dyslexic who continue to access the poorly functioning left hemispheric brain regions associated with language

Brain Scans Show Dyslexics Read Better with Alternative Strategies (http://www.dyslexia.com/science/different_pathways.htm)

A team of researchers led by Sally Shaywitz at Yale University has confirmed that dyslexic individuals who become good readers have a different pattern of brain use than either nondyslexic readers, or dyslexics who still read poorly.

or the semantic category test ["Are corn and rice in the same category?"] the persistently poor readers showed brain activity very similar to the nondyslexic control group, despite the fact that their reading performance was significantly impaired. Like the control group, the persistently poor readers activate left posterior and temporal systems. In contrast, the improved dyslexic readers bypassed this area entirely.

This research suggests that for dyslexic readers, the left brain areas associated with phonetic decoding are ineffective. While a non-dyslexic reader finds such pathways an efficient route to reading, the dyslexic reader essentially becomes entangled in a neural traffic jam. In contrast, dyslexics who bypass these mental pathways, relying more on areas of the brain involved in nonverbal thought and in analytic thought, are able to become capable readers


Those into the actual studies as in the long form

Disruption of Posterior Brain Systems for Reading in Children with Developmental Dyslexia (http://dyslexia.yale.edu/Child_Dys_Biol_Psych_2002.pdf)

This research explains my experience with dyslexia - When reading I am accessing areas of the brain associated with non-verbal forms of thinking which is how I know what words are even though I can neither pronounce nor spell them.

I am considered a compensated dyslexic. . . .but phonetics processing is only part of my disability - I can not see angles so when building things I use tactile input to compensate . . . .

I have no visual memory, slow prcessing speed, concentation problems, slow reading and hand eye cordination problems. What can be done that they could't do twenty years ago


This would indicate to me that you have more than dyslexia going on - you could have a processing disorder - I have sever dyslexia with more than one area of dysfunction but it does not affect my visual recall and only slows some areas of visual processing = those associated with language .

excel
07-06-10, 03:29 PM
excellent post. What about processing,visualization memory, and executive function

excel
01-02-11, 04:06 PM
I have a lot going. I think the anxiety is the worst

zannie
01-03-11, 01:15 AM
I was diagnosed with a learning disability when i was 10
45 years ago.

I think i was finally diagnosed in grade 5, after failing grade 2 and almost failing grades 3, 4, and 5 because the grade 5 teacher was right out of teachers college.

I am guessing that the information was fairly new at the time.

Didn't get any remedial help but it was a relief to know what was going on.

excel
01-04-11, 02:47 PM
What is organic dysfunction?

excel
12-22-11, 12:35 PM
What did they know about learning disabilties in 80 and 90s

QueensU_girl
12-27-11, 03:23 PM
@Excel: 'MBD' (minimal brain damage) is the old term for ADD/ADHD.

excel
12-27-11, 03:43 PM
@Excel: 'MBD' (minimal brain damage) is the old term for ADD/ADHD.
Yes but I do have brain damage caused by not getting oxgen when I was born. I guess I should of said lack of oxegen.

pechemignonne
12-27-11, 03:50 PM
What is organic dysfunction?
Brain damage would be an example of "organic dysfunction". It means that there is a cause that comes from damage/dysfunction of some organ or part of the body.

As opposed to what are considered "psychological" dysfunctions, where they can't really find a clear medical cause.

When I applied for disability, my doctor had to check a box for whether I had an "organic dysfunction". According to my doctor, depression and anxiety are not "organic dysfunctions", but for example epilepsy would be because it is considered a neurological problem.

excel
12-28-11, 12:46 PM
Isn't organic dysfunction an outdated term

pechemignonne
12-28-11, 01:47 PM
Dunno. Like I said, it showed up on a disability form a few years ago, so I think it's still in use.

meadd823
01-01-12, 06:13 AM
Isn't organic dysfunction an outdated term


Physician’s Role In Obtaining Accessible Instructional Materials In Specialized Formats For Students with Reading Disabilities




How do I know if my patient’s reading disability has an organic cause?

• Organic causes of reading problems include those related to dysfunction of the neural pathways required for fluent reading. These pathways involve brain structures. An example of organic cause might include dyslexia and related learning disorders.

• Nonorganic causes of reading problems include those unrelated to the neural pathway problems described above. Examples of nonorganic causes would include limited English proficiency, lack of instruction, poor attendance, oppositional-defiant disorder, and behavioral disorders.

• The following group of students are not automatically included or excluded as having reading disabilities of organic causes: learning disabilities,dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, chronic-fatigue syndrome, and autism.


This information was developed by the Center for Disabilities and Development,University of Iowa Children’s Hospital Iowa City, IA
July 2008


Although there are complaints that the term is confusing - it is not considered out dated

National Center for Learning Disabilities (http://www.copyright.gov/docs/sccr/comments/2009/kaloi.pdf)

The terms used to describe a reading disability, such as “resulting from organic dysfunction,” do not reflect the research-base and current understanding of reading-related learning disabilities (which represent the vast majority of individuals with learning disabilities). Furthermore, the term “reading disability resulting from an organic dysfunction” is not defined in authoritative medical or education literature, nor is such a category recognized in special education law or any other statutory provision outside the domain of NLS regulations. The origin of this terminology is unknown, and has created great confusion to those who have attempted to interpret it.






Hope this helps :)

Saboit
01-01-12, 06:39 AM
What are those neural pathways mentioned in meadd post????