View Full Version : ADD Coaches


Jean Osborne
05-21-04, 04:18 PM
Hello:
My name is Jean and I just joined this Forum last night. I have lived with ADHD most of my life and was officially diagnosed in 1997 (I think). Anyway, I had joined a support group a few years ago lead by a psychiatrist and I developed many useful tips from the group. Since then, I have not been able to find a support group, have struggled with several medications but have drug abuse in my past so anything with a stimulant in it I cannot take. I have been taking Strattera for about 3 months now and the results don't "seem" to be as noticeable. I have started work 2 months ago, I am in school working on my Bachelors degree (...and almost there :dizzy: )! I had been layed off for a year, suffered a great deal with feeling like my work was not valued and no one was interested in my skills (or lack of them). What I would like to get feedback on is an ADD coach. I am desperate to put my very busy life in order, so that I don't go crazy! If you know of any particular place I can look into, please, share it with me. I can't pay an arm and a leg...but I think I can spare a hand....

Thanks,
Jean

Garry
05-21-04, 08:48 PM
________________________________________________

As I am very lazy when it comes to typing so I have created a welcome page and ADDed a link here to get you there

My Welcome Page (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3345)

Garry

________________________________________________

ADDCoach4u
08-30-04, 02:11 AM
Hi Jean, here's a list of some Massachusetts support groups, I don't know your state so don't know if they're next door or 12 hours away. You could also start your own support group ie chadd chapter they will offer info in starting up a group.

Also there are some stimulants like Concerta that are time released so can not be so easily abused like Ritalin can. You might want to check with your doc on this.

I'm an adult ADD Coach you can check out my website in my profile.

If you can't afford individual coaching you may try some coach that does group coaching or if you have marketable skills that a coach may find useful you might try bartering with that coach.

good luck!

Pete

Please use the Massachusetts Forum for informatioin about MA Support Groups.


Hello:
My name is Jean and I just joined this Forum last night. I have lived with ADHD most of my life and was officially diagnosed in 1997 (I think). Anyway, I had joined a support group a few years ago lead by a psychiatrist and I developed many useful tips from the group. Since then, I have not been able to find a support group, have struggled with several medications but have drug abuse in my past so anything with a stimulant in it I cannot take. I have been taking Strattera for about 3 months now and the results don't "seem" to be as noticeable. I have started work 2 months ago, I am in school working on my Bachelors degree (...and almost there :dizzy: )! I had been layed off for a year, suffered a great deal with feeling like my work was not valued and no one was interested in my skills (or lack of them). What I would like to get feedback on is an ADD coach. I am desperate to put my very busy life in order, so that I don't go crazy! If you know of any particular place I can look into, please, share it with me. I can't pay an arm and a leg...but I think I can spare a hand....

Thanks,
Jean

Conlaw
08-30-04, 02:18 AM
Hi Pete,
I think a coach would be extremely helpful at home, and at the office. How does an ADD coach work? I could really use a live in coach :o ! Thanks, Susan

ADDCoach4u
08-30-04, 02:47 AM
Hi Susan,

Coaching is done over the phone with email follow up (sorry no live in coaching) so your coach can live anywhere near a phone.

Clients phone the coach 3-4 times a month for 30-45 minutes depending on the package. Many coaches have 2-3 different packages. Fees range from $200-$500 a month. Coaching focuses on getting the answers from inside of you using intuition and logic. It's more focused on questioning and awareness than advice giving.

At the end of a coaching session, a coach usually gives the client an inquiry or an assignment.

An inquiry is a way to think or behave differently in a given situation, to try out a different perspective on a belief, an emotion, a thought about an emotion or belief, etc.

An assignment is homework for your life. It's something you do in order to achieve something. It can be related to your human doing side (action), or your human being side (being). Both are important. The coach and client negotiate the inquiries and assignments. The coach will offer something and you can accept it, reject it or make a counteroffer. You have the final choice and the final benefit.


Here are some benefits of ADD coaching from my coaching brochure.

• Increase focus and organization.
• Follow through more frequently, and finish faster.
• Recognize, appreciate and build on your strengths.
• Reach your goals quicker with fewer struggles.
• Reduce feelings of being overwhelmed and build self-confidence.
• Acquire support, encouragement, and motivation.

• Work with someone who understands ADD because they’ve lived it.

Coaching is a very personal service so a good fit is a must. That's why most coaches offer a free sample session of coaching. It allows the prospective client to find out if the feel comfortable working with a particular coach and if coaching will be useful to them. It also allows the coach to decide if they want to work with that person and if they feel coaching is appropriate for their situation.

Sometimes coaches will ask a prospective client to fill out a coachability quiz before coaching to make sure they're open to coaching at this point in time.

Most coaches have website so you can check them out before emailing them or phoning them.

Pete

Tara
08-30-04, 07:23 PM
I would also love a live in ADD Coach...kind of like a nanny for people with ADD...lol

Even though many ADD Coaches do work over the phone there are additional types of help which you could get to come in your home and help. There are professional organizers, house keepers, personal assistants, homemakers, etc.

ADDCoach4u
08-30-04, 09:41 PM
Sometimes it's definitely worth paying for someone to do something you either aren't very good at and/or really hate and drains your energy. If it takes you 3 times or more the time to do it as a professional would, you might consider how much your time is worth and how much frustration and stress you're willing to endure.

Sometimes there are some skills you can learn to do a bit more efficently but you still hate doing them, and delegation/outsourcing the problem can be worth it.

There's also virtual assistants for business.

The advantage of hiring someone to do what you don't like doing is you can focus more on what you do like doing.

Pete


Helping adults with ADD (attention deficit disorder) decrease stress and increase focus and follow through.
Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group Leader