View Full Version : Disablity?


Firewriter
11-10-09, 09:28 PM
My son has recently been diagnosed with ADHD, but he doesn't show many signs but the medicine works. Is it a good idea? I'm just afraid the doctor was wrong. He hardly showed any signs for it.

Also, is it really a disablity? I read the grief thread and I really don't think my child is any less or more, I don't think my child is perfect but I don't think he's less then what ever he was before.

ginniebean
11-10-09, 10:03 PM
I don't get the whole grief thing either. Your son would not be diagnosed if he weren't showing enough signs.

Yes, it really is a disability and as things become more complex as your son ages he'll have challenges where you will see this.

If you want to do the very best for your son, read and read, early intervention means a decreased incidence of comorbid depression and anxiety as he gets older.

Good luck!

Firewriter
11-10-09, 10:17 PM
As a child, and I won't go into detail, he suffered trauma. What type of challenges, also all he does is hyper focus/loose focus at times and thats about it.

mctavish23
11-10-09, 10:39 PM
ADHD is a developmental disability in that the symptoms represent developmental

delays, when the ADHD individual is compared with their same age/same gender, non-

ADHD peers (who don't experience impairments (problems) in major life activities, when

engaging in symptomatic behavior).

That means that the Clinical Threshold is "Impairments" and the Metric is "Developmental

Deviance."

That also means that the symptoms change with age across a person's life span (and

corresponding stage of development).

There are a number of things that can "mimic" ADHD.

One of the best references around is :

The ADHD Book of Lists" by Sandra Rief,MA

Please check it out when you can.

Good Luck

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Firewriter
11-10-09, 10:44 PM
Thank you, that makes sense I hope he can out grow it, adhd or not.

Dizfriz
11-11-09, 09:46 AM
My son has recently been diagnosed with ADHD, but he doesn't show many signs but the medicine works. Is it a good idea? I'm just afraid the doctor was wrong. He hardly showed any signs for it.

Also, is it really a disability? I read the grief thread and I really don't think my child is any less or more, I don't think my child is perfect but I don't think he's less then what ever he was before.

Very good questions that you should be asking in your role as advocate for your child.

If you suspect the doctor might have been wrong then another evaluation many be in order. You do say however, that the medication was working so it does appear that there were at least some symptoms. In any case, if there are any doubts, I would suggest a second evaluation.

On your question on ADHD being a disability, it can very much be so. If fact if it does not meet the criteria of impairment " There must be clear evidence of clinically significant impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning." then a diagnosis of ADHD cannot be made. If the behavors are not causing problems then the child is not ADHD. That is an iron clad requirement for diagnosis.

To the grieving issue:

ginniebean
I don't get the whole grief thing either. Not all experience this and if you do not, your are indeed fortunate. Many do however, and for some it can be severe and profound. For those suffering from this, knowledge of why and awareness of the process can shorten the time spent in grief. Keep in mind that just because some do not experience something, it does not mean that others will not for they do and their grief is real.

One of the best tools for working with ADHD is accurate knowledge of the disorder. I really suggest, if your child is truly ADHD, that you learn as much as you can about the subject.

Here are two good places to start: First is The National Resource Center on AD/HD: Funded by the CDC, it is the nation's clearinghouse for science-based information on ADHD). http://www.help4adhd.org/


Next is this transcript of a workshop by Russell Barkley. Barkley is considered by most to be, by far, the top person in the field of ADHD. Many, including myself, consider this transcript to be the best write up on ADHD available on the internet. It is dated 2000 but most of the data is still basically pretty good. I do warn however that this is forty pages long and Barkley is information dense. It can be a bit of a struggle to work though so take your time. It is, in my opinion and in the opinion of many others, very much worth the effort. It has probably been of more help to the parents of ADHD children than any other thing I know. I am going to suggest you start with this overview and then download or read the article from there.

http://www.greatschools.net/cgi-bin/showarticle/2054

Anyway, these are good questions so keep on asking and learning.

Dizfriz

MGDAD
11-11-09, 02:27 PM
Head trauma can cause a child to get ADHD. However, I dont know if the treatment is different for trauma induced ADHD.

How was your son diagnosed? What made you seek out a diagnosis?

Firewriter
11-11-09, 04:24 PM
Thank you for all the help! His case is very mild. The medication is helping him though. I don't think he will be on it for very long.

He hit his head as a child a few times. He had to get stiches but I think it was the back of his head and the doctor wasn't worried about brain damage. Also, he just likes to imagine a lot, even on his medication (which is Centra) he still zones out at will. He can be very aggressive and I was going to get him signed up for an anger managment class. He has always and I mean always been like that but no school fights yet. The truama was emotional, and a diffrent story. He has very good control about being aggressive, does that sound like ADD? I heard something along the lines of violence.

I'll see about a forced seat change, his teacher is starting to get on my nerves.

Thanks again I will read that as soon as I can.