View Full Version : ADHD/Aspergers?? Need input from someone more familiar, lives with someone Aspie???


leapofaith
12-31-09, 04:14 PM
Hi, I have been looking into Aspergers lately. I have been questioning whether my husband and son may be Aspies. While there is alot of info out there, I could use some help.

From what I have read, like ADD, not every Aspie "looks the same" and it effects every one differently.

I am hoping someone who lives with a Aspergers person could help me figure a few things out. I need to know more so I can do whatever I need to for my son. My husband is fiercely against the psychology field. But if I think my son is effected I will go on with therapy for him.

A little about what I see as far as his family and their behaviors:
My husbands mother is certainly ADD innatentive . She shows classic sign. That much I know for sure. His father who just turned 70 really fits the Aspie bill. He is very awkward in social environments, even though its always just family. He has a hard time making eye contact. He gets very anxious when things (order of the house) get out of place. He spends most of his time "picking up" after the family and regaining "order". Christmas day was especially difficult for him. He doesn't seem to "enjoy" his family in the sense other do. He "blurts" out really inappropriate things, especially when he is the center of attention, ie his birthday-blowing out candles...
His garage is spotless, every single thing is neatly placed on its own hook. Out of curiosity, (not to be mean) I moved a couple of packages of screws around. Next time I went over there they were moved back to the original spot. He seems a little OCD. Other people see his behavior too. Though not so much in a clinical way. I have a tendency to analyze behaviors clinically sometimes, especially when behaviors are this odd.

As for my husband......His behavior, so far to me, seems to be a mix of ADHD and Aspergers. I noticed that alot of symptoms seem to over lap, given my ignorance about Aspergers I have copied the criteria below and will try to answer the questions. I hope I can find some answers. Any input would be very appreciated. I know this is a very long post. I will do my best to keep it as short and to the point as possible....I will answer the following pertaining to my 40y/o husband. He is a police detective, 15 years on the job.



Box 1.Diagnostic criteria for Aspergerís syndrome according to DSM-IV (shortened)

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
my husband won't make eye contact with me while I am speaking to him, even after multiple requests and telling him I feel like he is not listening if he isn't looking at me. His excuse is, "I can listen to you and (read, watch tv, look through the mail...) at the same time!" He never really "hears me". Unless of course it is one of the few subjects that interest him.
Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
my husband 'cannot' socialize with out drinking heavily, even with family, if some one stops by unexpectidly, he is very 'antsy'. what ever he talks about always comes back to his few intrests some how. He constantly interrupts and changes subjects at odd times. He has one 'close' friend, but the only thing they have in common really is hunting. which is a subject my husband obsesses about.



Lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people
Lack of social or emotional reciprocity

Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
This is the area that is severe. He has been hunting since he was 8 or 9. He lives, breaths, sleeps and obsesses over hunting. If I had to make a list of his priorities hunting would be the top 10. It comes before ANYTHING else. Including family and responsibilities. From the end of aug. to the end of dec. he thinks of nothing else. His whole world revolves around it. To the exclusion of his children and wife's needs. This is a literal explanation. Hunting is an obsession and addiction to him it seems.
Apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
he is rigid in thinking, not able to see or tolerate the way others do things, he often states that peoples ways or feelings make no "sense". he cannot budge from his views or position or relate in any way to how or why people are the way they are.

Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms
This is something I have not noticed. like he doesn't walk on his toes or pysically move repetitively in any way.
Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects
I haven't noticed any blatent signs of this either.


The disturbance causes clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

There is no clinically significant general delay in language e.g., single words used by age two years, communicative phrases used by age three years).
He was in speech therapy during grade school. He speaks in a tone that is often hard to hear. He mumbles alot.
There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development.
Criteria are not met for another specific pervasive developmental disorder or schizophrenia.
Ok, my brain hurts, I will have to finish this later. Please feel free to ask ANY questions, give any input. Thanks!!



Box 2.DSM-IV extensions after Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA) (modified)
Ad A) Difficulties in understanding social situations and other peopleís thoughts and feelings
Ad B) Tendency to think of issues as being black and white, rather than considering multiple perspectives in a flexible way
Additionally: Qualitative impairments in verbal or nonverbal communication with at least three of the following symptoms:

Tendency to turn any conversation back on to self or own topic of interest Yup, every single time he opens his mouth.
Marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others. Cannot see the point of superficial social contact, niceties, or passing time with others, unless there is a clear discussion point/debate or activity.
Pedantic style of speaking, inclusion of too much detail
Inability to recognize when the listener is interested or bored
Frequent tendency to say things without considering the emotional impact on the listener
Additionally: Impairment in at least one of the criteria relating to childhood imagination:

Lack of varied, spontaneous make believe play appropriate to developmental level
Inability to tell, write or generate spontaneous, unscripted or unplagiarized fiction
Either lack of interest in fiction (written, or drama) appropriate to developmental level or interest in fiction is restricted to its possible basis in fact (e.g. science fiction, history, technical aspects of film)

Lady Lark
12-31-09, 06:44 PM
Well, part of what made me start thinking that my son wasn't just ADHD was going nearly a year without huge success in treatment. That got me wondering if there was something more there, or something different altogether, and after hours of reading, we were pretty sure it was Asperger's (or bi-polar). The funny thing was, apparently the special ed teacher at his school, asked his teacher if Steven was an aspie, and that was after watching him on the playground for five min.

It's slightly different here, because Steven doesn't have his one obsessive topic. He's into video games, but no more then any other kid his age. What we really noticed was the lack of social skills, as we've often described him as having the social skills of a hamster. :p

(See, the adder will blurt out about how an outfit is ugly, but then realize right after that they shouldn't have said that cause it's not all that nice. An aspie will say the same thing, but without really understanding why it's not nice to tell someone that.)

And order, he had to have order. He actually ended up chocking a kid (well, it escalated from the first conflict) because they weren't in the right place in line at school. He always wanted the same lunch, always sat in the same place for dinner, and would just freak out if things were changed from the normal routine.

I had actually gotten to the point where I would give him several warnings leading up to dr appts, Sat events, or anything that was different then the norm. I'd also give warnings before he needed to stop doing something and go do something else since he was horrible about transitions.

I remember one time he was mad for three days straight cause he had to get new shoes. Never mind that the old ones were literally falling apart around his feet. :p :rolleyes:

wsmac
01-01-10, 06:18 PM
While I have not lived with an Aspie, I have had a nephew who is, and a co-worker I am 'close' to who is.

First off, I was struck by the fact that your husband is a detective.
Quite interesting!

I'm not sure of it's significance though.
The Law Enforcement officers I have known all my life who have stayed with the job for a long time... say beyond 5 yrs or so... seem to establish an insular world based upon their continual exposure to the suffering of humanity, and their role in such.

To witness and be forced to react to the extremes of human behavior, in the way that LEO's are, would no doubt cause a person to put up the well-known 'blue wall', in order to continue in the job.

Even EMS and FD personnel can get to this point, depending on where they work and what they experience day-in and day-out.

To me, his being a detective ads a different significance to his actions.
Couple that with possibly having Asperger's Syndrome and/or ADD/HD... it I could see where reaching this person on a very personal level could be difficult.

Cops are notorious for braving the emotional roller-coaster and being rewarded by their brethren for it.
By admitting weakness by seeing a 'shrink', huge self-doubts may arise and further complicate this individual's life.

A very real and prominent example of this mindset is what we are seeing with soldiers serving in the Middle East right now.
Despite orders and allowances from the 'Brass Upstairs', the common soldier still seems to be scared off from seeking mental therapy.
The result is the harm we witness to these individuals and the manner in which they act out their pain and frustrations.

I suppose I may be wandering off-topic here... sorry...

From my experience being around two Aspies, I can say that accommodations have to be made by the non-Aspie in order to gain the confidence of the person.

I had to learn not to stare into these people's faces when talking or listening.

I had to learn not to walk up and put my hand on them, in the friendliest of gestures even, without warning them in some manner.

I had to learn to really listen to them in a manner different than what I do with NT's, or other people.

It's not giving up, not giving in to their demands, to change the manner in which you approach these folks.
It's learning their language... so to speak.

Now... convincing him to accept therapy... I truly wish I had some sure-fire way to make that happen, but I do not.:o

Part of what might help in your quest is to find out, if you can, what lifestyle changes around home might fit better with his Aspie-ness.
If he does not like multitudes of individuals milling about your home, then try to arrange large family get-togethers somewhere else next time.

If he really does need certain things 'in order', like his father, is it possible to meet that need without totally sacrificing your own happiness?

I think that while trying to accommodate your husband, you should also make sure to take good care of yourself as well.:)

Take a look at John Elder Robison's web page and book.
I loved the book.
He actually came to WrongPlanet and posted a few times and seemed quite friendly.

MODERATORS - these links are not against any policy that I am aware of here at ADD Forums, please do not take them away! I am posting these in order to help folks, I am not attempting to sell anything or to promote another website, etc
Thanks

{www.johnrobison.com}
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwzfgNWmR6E&feature=related

Lunacie
01-01-10, 08:07 PM
wsmac - thank you for posting those links. I was trying to think how to explain some of the less obvious repetitious movements, like rocking back and forth. I've always done that when I'm very anxious or stressed or unhappy. My youngest granddaughter, who has more severe Autism (yet still a high-functioning sort) has spent much of her life standing in the middle of the room and spinning around and around... for an hour or more... without getting dizzy.

Kids and adults with ADHD tend to do things like tapping a pencil on the desk, twirling a piece of hair, swinging their feet. Perhaps someone who has Asperger's or other kinds of Autism use their whole body in a repetitive movement instead of just a part of their body?

daveddd
01-01-10, 09:48 PM
Hi, I have been looking into Aspergers lately. I have been questioning whether my husband and son may be Aspies. While there is alot of info out there, I could use some help.

From what I have read, like ADD, not every Aspie "looks the same" and it effects every one differently.

I am hoping someone who lives with a Aspergers person could help me figure a few things out. I need to know more so I can do whatever I need to for my son. My husband is fiercely against the psychology field. But if I think my son is effected I will go on with therapy for him.

A little about what I see as far as his family and their behaviors:
My husbands mother is certainly ADD innatentive . She shows classic sign. That much I know for sure. His father who just turned 70 really fits the Aspie bill. He is very awkward in social environments, even though its always just family. He has a hard time making eye contact. He gets very anxious when things (order of the house) get out of place. He spends most of his time "picking up" after the family and regaining "order". Christmas day was especially difficult for him. He doesn't seem to "enjoy" his family in the sense other do. He "blurts" out really inappropriate things, especially when he is the center of attention, ie his birthday-blowing out candles...
His garage is spotless, every single thing is neatly placed on its own hook. Out of curiosity, (not to be mean) I moved a couple of packages of screws around. Next time I went over there they were moved back to the original spot. He seems a little OCD. Other people see his behavior too. Though not so much in a clinical way. I have a tendency to analyze behaviors clinically sometimes, especially when behaviors are this odd.

As for my husband......His behavior, so far to me, seems to be a mix of ADHD and Aspergers. I noticed that alot of symptoms seem to over lap, given my ignorance about Aspergers I have copied the criteria below and will try to answer the questions. I hope I can find some answers. Any input would be very appreciated. I know this is a very long post. I will do my best to keep it as short and to the point as possible....I will answer the following pertaining to my 40y/o husband. He is a police detective, 15 years on the job.



Box 1.Diagnostic criteria for Aspergerís syndrome according to DSM-IV (shortened)

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
my husband won't make eye contact with me while I am speaking to him, even after multiple requests and telling him I feel like he is not listening if he isn't looking at me. His excuse is, "I can listen to you and (read, watch tv, look through the mail...) at the same time!" He never really "hears me". Unless of course it is one of the few subjects that interest him.
Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
my husband 'cannot' socialize with out drinking heavily, even with family, if some one stops by unexpectidly, he is very 'antsy'. what ever he talks about always comes back to his few intrests some how. He constantly interrupts and changes subjects at odd times. He has one 'close' friend, but the only thing they have in common really is hunting. which is a subject my husband obsesses about.



Lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people
Lack of social or emotional reciprocity

Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
This is the area that is severe. He has been hunting since he was 8 or 9. He lives, breaths, sleeps and obsesses over hunting. If I had to make a list of his priorities hunting would be the top 10. It comes before ANYTHING else. Including family and responsibilities. From the end of aug. to the end of dec. he thinks of nothing else. His whole world revolves around it. To the exclusion of his children and wife's needs. This is a literal explanation. Hunting is an obsession and addiction to him it seems.
Apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
he is rigid in thinking, not able to see or tolerate the way others do things, he often states that peoples ways or feelings make no "sense". he cannot budge from his views or position or relate in any way to how or why people are the way they are.

Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms
This is something I have not noticed. like he doesn't walk on his toes or pysically move repetitively in any way.
Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects
I haven't noticed any blatent signs of this either.


The disturbance causes clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

There is no clinically significant general delay in language e.g., single words used by age two years, communicative phrases used by age three years).
He was in speech therapy during grade school. He speaks in a tone that is often hard to hear. He mumbles alot.
There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development.
Criteria are not met for another specific pervasive developmental disorder or schizophrenia.
Ok, my brain hurts, I will have to finish this later. Please feel free to ask ANY questions, give any input. Thanks!!



Box 2.DSM-IV extensions after Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA) (modified)
Ad A) Difficulties in understanding social situations and other peopleís thoughts and feelings
Ad B) Tendency to think of issues as being black and white, rather than considering multiple perspectives in a flexible way
Additionally: Qualitative impairments in verbal or nonverbal communication with at least three of the following symptoms:

Tendency to turn any conversation back on to self or own topic of interest Yup, every single time he opens his mouth.
Marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others. Cannot see the point of superficial social contact, niceties, or passing time with others, unless there is a clear discussion point/debate or activity.
Pedantic style of speaking, inclusion of too much detail
Inability to recognize when the listener is interested or bored
Frequent tendency to say things without considering the emotional impact on the listener
Additionally: Impairment in at least one of the criteria relating to childhood imagination:

Lack of varied, spontaneous make believe play appropriate to developmental level
Inability to tell, write or generate spontaneous, unscripted or unplagiarized fiction
Either lack of interest in fiction (written, or drama) appropriate to developmental level or interest in fiction is restricted to its possible basis in fact (e.g. science fiction, history, technical aspects of film)


i dont know about AS and heres why:

i am going to start off by saying look deeply into social anxiety, a subject in which i am very familiar with (i also once almost convinced myself i had Aspergers )

1. biggest symptom of SA, social deficiency, in which you say he covers with booze
booze will not teach him social skills in the timeframe in which it takes him to get drunk, it WILL alleviate social anxiety (I know this to be fact)
2. the hunting -depression is almost always comorbid with SA, now combine hyperfocus with what people in the depression world call distractible behavior and that may be a better fit
3. few friends -SA is a lot deeper than most people think, a symptom that to me is worse than the anxiety itself is rumination, we tend to constantly ruminate about how we were judged in past events even though they had little or no impact on other parties involved

one way to avoid the intense feelings this brings us is to avoid contact with as many people as possible

and i will add once i was medicated these events became laughable (these events went back years and years

4. lack of empathy-can be explained by depression or lack of social contact because of anxiety

Im not challenging your view, im just giving you an option that is much much easier to treat

and everything hear is based off of personnal experience

Puzelle
01-13-10, 06:39 AM
It seems to me that your husband very likely has Asperger's Syndrome.

About eye contact: If you ask him to look you in the eye, it'll be even harder for him to do so. In fact, it isn't natural at all to him to look people in the eye. Even though it's a basic social thing to you and most other people, this doesn't mean your husband is not social when it's uncomfortable to him. I know that is how it seems, but if you keep in mind what I have written right here, it may help you to gain a contact with your husband that doesn't focus on eye contact as the main thing.

I have battled the eye contact problem all my life. Especially as a kid, I had people thinking I was lying because I couldn't look them in the eye. And the more I knew I had to "show" them I was telling the truth, and the more insistent others were that I look them in the eye, the harder it became, and the more I acted as if I was actually lying (that is, according the neuro typical behaviour. Among people with Asperger's I never run into this problem, lol).

*******

For some reason there is a tendency for Asperger's Syndrome and ADD/ADHD to run in the same families. As Asperger's is a mild form of Autism and ADHD is not, more study into both fields needs to be done.
There is so much that isn't known about the human brain and how it works.

*******

Can I ask you two things about your husband:

Do you know wether he was a late speaker (I know he had speaking therapy, but that doesn't signify wether he was late too)?

Is your husband, and has he always been, or was he as a child, very contact seeking?

I ask these two things because there is a variant within the Autism Spectrum called Non Verbal Learning Disorder (in short NVLD). It looks a lot like Asperger's, but is different from it in a few distinct areas.

The two "disorders", NVLD and Asperger's are traditionally kept as two different things, and I have never seen a discription of someone who had both. However, I have both, and I can't believe it's so unusual, so that's why I mention it. Having a strain of NVLD and being diagnosed with Asperger's - if you have both - will often make you feel something isn't quite right. And, as we know, "something not being quite right" can ride an aspie like a mare.

*******

Is your husband highly intelligent? If so, this is another indication that he has Asperger's, whereas it doesn't have any significance for NVLD.

Empathy impairment or ability seems to be another thing that parts the two variants. But I will not go into this, as I think it is dangerous in a very uncomfortable way when we begin to try and decide wether or not someone else has the ability to feel empathy or not.

*******

You mention overlapping of ADHD and Asperger's Syndrome.
That may be the case. I hear it a lot. And I myself, being a person with Asperger's Syndrome, certainly have very significant symptoms that we usually know as ADHD.

Noone have been able to prove that any neurological damage is the cause of Asperger's Syndrome.
But it seems to be commonly agreed that neurological damage pre birth is the cause of clinical ADHD.

The problem I have here, is that the causes for Asperger's and ADHD/ADD are so different, and yet so many aspies just happen to have both.
Therefore I think that there is two basical types of ADHD if not more. One is the type we see in people who are otherwise Neuro Typical folk and not aspies. This would be the clinical ADHD/ADD. Another basical type would simply be part of Asperger's Syndrome and just have the same characteristics as ADHD/ADD to a certain degree.

This may seem far fetched, but I think there's more reason to it than there seems to be. However, it is just a hypothesis, but I thought it worth to mention it just the same.

My personal feeling about the whole question about Asperger's and ADHD in the same person, is one of two:

1. There is a form of ADHD that has nothing to do with damaged neurons in the brain, but which is simply part of a personality type: Asperger's Syndrome personality type, or other personality types like it (we need a new name for Asperger's, one that doesn't have the "syndrome" part!).

2. The ADHD disorder can occur in any personality type, including Asperger's Syndrome, but is a distinct disorder with neurological causes that has no connection to Asperger's as such. As there are more people who do not have Asperger's then people who do have Asperger's, this form of ADHD is seen predominantly among Neuro Typicals (i.e. not among people with Asperger's).

Since there is no research that supports my thesis, it is a question about how you feel about it, and what you have been able to find out to be the case in your own (your loved one's) case.

*******

(I'm sure he has Asperger's!)

Good luck to you and your family! :-)


Puzelle.

daveddd
01-13-10, 06:02 PM
It seems to me that your husband very likely has Asperger's Syndrome.

About eye contact: If you ask him to look you in the eye, it'll be even harder for him to do so. In fact, it isn't natural at all to him to look people in the eye. Even though it's a basic social thing to you and most other people, this doesn't mean your husband is not social when it's uncomfortable to him. I know that is how it seems, but if you keep in mind what I have written right here, it may help you to gain a contact with your husband that doesn't focus on eye contact as the main thing.

I have battled the eye contact problem all my life. Especially as a kid, I had people thinking I was lying because I couldn't look them in the eye. And the more I knew I had to "show" them I was telling the truth, and the more insistent others were that I look them in the eye, the harder it became, and the more I acted as if I was actually lying (that is, according the neuro typical behaviour. Among people with Asperger's I never run into this problem, lol).

*******

For some reason there is a tendency for Asperger's Syndrome and ADD/ADHD to run in the same families. As Asperger's is a mild form of Autism and ADHD is not, more study into both fields needs to be done.
There is so much that isn't known about the human brain and how it works.

*******

Can I ask you two things about your husband:

Do you know wether he was a late speaker (I know he had speaking therapy, but that doesn't signify wether he was late too)?

Is your husband, and has he always been, or was he as a child, very contact seeking?

I ask these two things because there is a variant within the Autism Spectrum called Non Verbal Learning Disorder (in short NVLD). It looks a lot like Asperger's, but is different from it in a few distinct areas.

The two "disorders", NVLD and Asperger's are traditionally kept as two different things, and I have never seen a discription of someone who had both. However, I have both, and I can't believe it's so unusual, so that's why I mention it. Having a strain of NVLD and being diagnosed with Asperger's - if you have both - will often make you feel something isn't quite right. And, as we know, "something not being quite right" can ride an aspie like a mare.

*******

Is your husband highly intelligent? If so, this is another indication that he has Asperger's, whereas it doesn't have any significance for NVLD.

Empathy impairment or ability seems to be another thing that parts the two variants. But I will not go into this, as I think it is dangerous in a very uncomfortable way when we begin to try and decide wether or not someone else has the ability to feel empathy or not.

*******

You mention overlapping of ADHD and Asperger's Syndrome.
That may be the case. I hear it a lot. And I myself, being a person with Asperger's Syndrome, certainly have very significant symptoms that we usually know as ADHD.

Noone have been able to prove that any neurological damage is the cause of Asperger's Syndrome.
But it seems to be commonly agreed that neurological damage pre birth is the cause of clinical ADHD.

The problem I have here, is that the causes for Asperger's and ADHD/ADD are so different, and yet so many aspies just happen to have both.
Therefore I think that there is two basical types of ADHD if not more. One is the type we see in people who are otherwise Neuro Typical folk and not aspies. This would be the clinical ADHD/ADD. Another basical type would simply be part of Asperger's Syndrome and just have the same characteristics as ADHD/ADD to a certain degree.

This may seem far fetched, but I think there's more reason to it than there seems to be. However, it is just a hypothesis, but I thought it worth to mention it just the same.

My personal feeling about the whole question about Asperger's and ADHD in the same person, is one of two:

1. There is a form of ADHD that has nothing to do with damaged neurons in the brain, but which is simply part of a personality type: Asperger's Syndrome personality type, or other personality types like it (we need a new name for Asperger's, one that doesn't have the "syndrome" part!).

2. The ADHD disorder can occur in any personality type, including Asperger's Syndrome, but is a distinct disorder with neurological causes that has no connection to Asperger's as such. As there are more people who do not have Asperger's then people who do have Asperger's, this form of ADHD is seen predominantly among Neuro Typicals (i.e. not among people with Asperger's).

Since there is no research that supports my thesis, it is a question about how you feel about it, and what you have been able to find out to be the case in your own (your loved one's) case.

*******

(I'm sure he has Asperger's!)

Good luck to you and your family! :-)


Puzelle.

doesnt seem like a strong argument for aspergers , its a highly over SELF diagnosed disorder

not looking into someones eyes does not constitute autism

kibbled_bits
01-18-10, 01:47 AM
Totally agree with aspergers is over self diagnosed. Spectrum disorders are complex however and remember that they have merged asperbers with mild autism to make diagnosis less complex since there is little to no difference.

Also eye contact is also a symptom of ADHD (among other things). It's complex though, I remember as a child feeling comfortable looking into other peoples eyes (felt it was intrusive and maybe rude). As a young adult I looked at people but I would look away when they looked back. Now as an adult I've conditioned myself to making normal eye contact with people but at times it's difficult. My son has issues with this too, I tell him "eye contact" to remind him.

Skyler H
02-20-10, 02:35 AM
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Aspergers children will rarely show pretty numbed of other people's feelings. They don't indicate to be insensible but they lack the social skills to have or show understanding to others. They will often appear carefree in the interests of others also and will only be interested in their own knowledge or interests which may also make them seem to be insensitive to other people's needs.

meridian
02-20-10, 09:50 AM
Fascinating thread. I met an Aspie teen once at a social gathering with his family (his Dad and I have a friend in common). He was withdrawn and seemed moody while his sister was easy to talk to. Other than that I've had no experience with Asperger's.

BUT, what happens when the dx of Asprerger's goes away in the DSM V as has been widely reported?

Does that mean AS will simply be blended in to the Autistic spectrum? and how will that affect the people who understand their or their loved one's conditions through the "lens" of AS?

I'm just curious how you all feel about that.

radicalartist
02-22-10, 07:39 AM
Hey I'm a aspie, your post was too long.

I thought this was a adhd forum :P

yeah... feel free to message me though simple easy questions :)