View Full Version : So, intelligence is defined as fast processing speed, where does that leave the rest?


seamstress
01-16-10, 10:19 PM
If someone has slow processing speed (as seen in SCT and inattentive attention deficits), how is it possible for them to succeed in such a fast-paced world. We live in a world that prizes speed, efficiency, time-management, accuracy, and organization? What kinds of fields do not necessarily require these skills? I can't even think of one.

blueroo
01-17-10, 04:29 PM
Sewing. Creative arts. There are plenty of contemplative studies.

seamstress
01-18-10, 11:50 PM
True...but I guess the thought of a life of complete "freedom" and boundless creativity kind of ...terrifies me. My life is already in chaos. But, the idea of you know..."just sewing" or "creative arts" , does have an effervescent allure....maybe creative writing? Or Maybe I'll be a silent Van Gogh(haha).

Thanks for starting me up on a positive train of thought cause my post should've been in the "depression" section.

Cacho
01-18-10, 11:55 PM
What kind of idiot defines intelligence as fast processing speed?

Try building a bridge, proving a mathematical theorem, doing investigative journalism, writing music, preforming a surgery, or anything else where quality is important while maximizing "processing speed." Epic fail.

Intelligence requires accuracy, precision, reasoning, association, and a ton of other stuff.

Processing speed can obviously help, but the saying, "Slow and steady wins the race," didn't just materialize out of nowhere.

I used to SCUBA dive a lot. There we are thought something that applies to life. If you get into trouble you should:
1) STOP
2) Breath (if possible)
3) Think
4) Act

While speed is flashy and impressive, it is way overrated.

CircularingCats
01-19-10, 11:15 AM
"Intelligence," as I believe can be basically defined, is a person's "ability to learn and understand" -- not what they've learned or how fast they learn.

Sure, we live in a fast-paced world, but the world may simply be a bad fit for you.

Now, some people, no matter what, have an inability to grasp certain concepts or types of learning. They would be considered unintelligent in those areas, or simply not intelligent.

So I imagine you can be a slow learner or have a quirky way of learning or whatever, but you can also still be highly intelligent amidst all these obstacles.

PickMeUpRoadie
01-19-10, 10:51 PM
If someone has slow processing speed (as seen in SCT and inattentive attention deficits), how is it possible for them to succeed in such a fast-paced world. We live in a world that prizes speed, efficiency, time-management, accuracy, and organization? What kinds of fields do not necessarily require these skills? I can't even think of one.

I find it to be the opposite of this notion.

As a sound engineer, I find that my best work is done when I have 45 minutes to set up the show that takes 2 hours to set up. My best ideas are thought of when there is a sudden, crippling problem and the show starts in 3 minutes.

I don't think it is all based on processing speed for us, but rather the situation. If being successful is based on repeating the same task over and over again with the same result with a high efficiency, then I don't want to be successful. I would rather be put on the spot to troubleshoot what no one else can, I would rather listen to Mozart piano concertos with a depressed old man in a psych unit and bring him out of his depressive episode with no psych drugs (my other job).

Success is measured by the majority 9 times out of 10.

distracted40
01-19-10, 11:30 PM
No... intelligence is defined by the ability to solve problems.

brillosa
01-21-10, 04:47 PM
I'm a middle school teacher, and I always try to emphasize Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences with my students. The most commonly focused on are the Verbal-Linguistic and Logical/Mathematical.

I find that a lot of my "LD" students have AMAZING Visual/Spacial intelligence, and often Intrapersonal intelligence. Although they may not get all the answers on the math worksheet correct the first, second, or even 20th time, if we are doing a creative project, such as designing a poster to illustrate a concept, they will almost always outshine the rest.

For example, my student with the slowest processing speed won the whole school science fair last year. His project was amazing. His experiment was COMPLETELY ORIGINAL, unique, and creative. (This is VERY impressive, because almost every other student finds their project ideas off the internet or from a book.) His display board was meticulous and beautiful. He had two months to complete it, and he completely outdid himself.

So, I will definitely agree that creative fields as well as any type of job that allows long-term projects. Web or graphic design comes to mind.