View Full Version : Asperger's disorder to cease to exist. Thoughts?


Trooper Keith
02-14-10, 12:10 PM
It appears as if DSM-V is going to get with the times and disappear Asperger's disorder entirely into the autism spectrum, such that individuals currently diagnosed with Asperger's disorder will now be diagnosed with autism (Swedo, 2009). I personally welcome this change because Asperger's disorder is poorly empirically validated as it stands, and the symptom overlap with autism is profound. Pervasive Developmental Disorder, NOS will also be disappearing.

I know that there is a large community of people with both real and imaginary Asperger's disorders diagnoses, stemming mainly from the neurodiversity movement, who consider themselves to be special and sometimes even superior to "neurotypicals." I'm wondering how this proposed change is going to affect them? I'm particularly interested in how it will affect people who self-identify as Asperger's without actually having been diagnosed with the disorder. Are these people going to start telling people they are autistic once Asperger's disorder ceases to exist?



References

Swedo, S. (2009). Report of the DSM-V Neurodevelopmental Disorders Work Group. American Psychiatric Association. Retrieved February 14, 2010 from http://www.psych.org/MainMenu/Research/DSMIV/DSMV/DSMRevisionActivities/DSM-V-Work-Group-Reports/Neurodevelopmental-Disorders-Work-Group-Report.aspx

daveddd
02-14-10, 01:01 PM
i think people will definitely not be as quick to put themselves into this category

didnt adhd used to have a cruder name , if it were still called that i doubt there would be as many cases of adhd either

Lady Lark
02-14-10, 03:17 PM
Given that I routinely describe my son's Asperger's as high function autism, it really doesn't effect us. It is odd though, because I remember seeing research that looked like Asperger's and autism would eventually be separated into a left brain, right brain autism description.
*shrugs*
Always onward, always changing. :)

Redd Skyes
02-14-10, 04:17 PM
Personally, I don't agree. But I don't have children. I just work with them. I don't know how this is going to go over with parents. I came across a dad who said about his son "he's NOT Autistic, he has PDD NOS!" I guess he felt as long as it wasn't autism, there was a chance of making his son "normal". Not exactly a healthy belief, but still, I wonder how he's going to take this.

There's a boy at my school with Asperger's and he doesn't flap his hands, or do any other type of repetitive movements. He's also not echolalic and his voice is not as "robotic" (sorry for the description) as some of the kids I've had with Autism. He does have behaviors which have improved dramatically since he was placed on meds and he's a smart boy educated in a general ed. classroom. Similarly, there's another boy in my school who is high functioning Autistic. He's able to be educated in the least restrictive environment. Sometimes when he can't get his way, he will have a melt down and throw his jacket or lunch box on the floor and cry. He does flap his hands. His voice is kind of "robotic", and he is known to sometimes repeat the last word a person has said over and over. He's actually a very intelligent, sweet kid. And there IS a difference between his characteristics and behaviors and the boy I mentioned above.

I've worked with both Aspies and Autistics. I personally do see a difference in their disorders. I'm not sure lumping them all together would be a good thing. :confused:

peripatetic
02-14-10, 05:01 PM
dave,

it was minimal brain dysfunction at some point. (yeah, i doubt anyone wants to jump on that bandwagon...:p)

i think people will definitely not be as quick to put themselves into this category

didnt adhd used to have a cruder name , if it were still called that i doubt there would be as many cases of adhd either

daveddd
02-14-10, 05:05 PM
Personally, I don't agree. But I don't have children. I just work with them. I don't know how this is going to go over with parents. I came across a dad who said about his son "he's NOT Autistic, he has PDD NOS!" I guess he felt as long as it wasn't autism, there was a chance of making his son "normal". Not exactly a healthy belief, but still, I wonder how he's going to take this.

There's a boy at my school with Asperger's and he doesn't flap his hands, or do any other type of repetitive movements. He's also not echolalic and his voice is not as "robotic" (sorry for the description) as some of the kids I've had with Autism. He does have behaviors which have improved dramatically since he was placed on meds and he's a smart boy educated in a general ed. classroom. Similarly, there's another boy in my school who is high functioning Autistic. He's able to be educated in the least restrictive environment. Sometimes when he can't get his way, he will have a melt down and throw his jacket or lunch box on the floor and cry. He does flap his hands. His voice is kind of "robotic", and he is known to sometimes repeat the last word a person has said over and over. He's actually a very intelligent, sweet kid. And there IS a difference between his characteristics and behaviors and the boy I mentioned above.

I've worked with both Aspies and Autistics. I personally do see a difference in their disorders. I'm not sure lumping them all together would be a good thing. :confused:


what kinda meds help autism

ginniebean
02-14-10, 05:55 PM
Dave, some kids with autism are given anti-psychotics and others stimulants. It really varies.

Autism is a spectrum and probably there are hundreds of different kinds of autism. I'm still not informed enough to give a good enough opinion.

The reason it is important to put averything under one umbrella, so to speak, is because many states allow insurance companies to exclude coverage (if it's provided at all for autism) for some services for those with either Apserger's or PDD-NOS.


If it keeps insurance companies from excluding treatment for people then I'm all for it.

daveddd
02-14-10, 05:59 PM
Dave, some kids with autism are given anti-psychotics and others stimulants. It really varies.

Autism is a spectrum and probably there are hundreds of different kinds of autism. I'm still not informed enough to give a good enough opinion.

The reason it is important to put averything under one umbrella, so to speak, is because many states allow insurance companies to exclude coverage (if it's provided at all for autism) for some services for those with either Apserger's or PDD-NOS.


If it keeps insurance companies from excluding treatment for people then I'm all for it.


so it just treats innattention and mood symptoms?

ginniebean
02-14-10, 06:07 PM
Yep, there's no drugs specific to autism.. they can treat all sortsof other symptoms tho.

Trooper Keith
02-14-10, 06:54 PM
There's a boy at my school with Asperger's and he doesn't flap his hands, or do any other type of repetitive movements. He's also not echolalic and his voice is not as "robotic" (sorry for the description) as some of the kids I've had with Autism. He does have behaviors which have improved dramatically since he was placed on meds and he's a smart boy educated in a general ed. classroom. Similarly, there's another boy in my school who is high functioning Autistic. He's able to be educated in the least restrictive environment. Sometimes when he can't get his way, he will have a melt down and throw his jacket or lunch box on the floor and cry. He does flap his hands. His voice is kind of "robotic", and he is known to sometimes repeat the last word a person has said over and over. He's actually a very intelligent, sweet kid. And there IS a difference between his characteristics and behaviors and the boy I mentioned above.

The new system is going to create an autism spectrum that ranges from "normal variation" to "severely autistic." It sounds like your non-flapping, non-repetitive behavior child barely meets the requirements for Asperger's disorder (repetitive behaviors are a linchpin of the Asperger's diagnosis). He would likely err towards the 'normal variation' side of things.

chips
02-14-10, 08:34 PM
I have been talking to my partner, who is officially diagnosed with Aspergers, how he would refer to himself with this change. He has quite often in the past have refered himself to high functioning autism when explaining to people what Aspergers is. Somehow this makes it easier for them to understand this terminology.

He feels that he is definately part of the 'autistic community' not just Aspergers.

He also thinks that Aspergers will still be used for many years to come as yet it will take sometime for the new terminology to filter through.

His clinical psychologist who specialises in Aspergers also works with the top world renowned aspergers specialist. He has emailed them about the changes only yesterday to see what their thoughts are. Will be interesting to see what they think.

ADHDTigger
02-14-10, 08:38 PM
dave,

it was minimal brain dysfunction at some point. (yeah, i doubt anyone wants to jump on that bandwagon...:p)

I was diagnosed with Minimal Brain Dysfunction in 1967. There are a few of us here who got that diagnosis. Wasn't any happier with ADHD in terms of what it's called. Just grateful to know that there are things I can do about it.

kibbled_bits
02-18-10, 01:14 PM
This really makes a lot more sense. It will be better once all the Autism, Asperbers & PDD-NOS material is all consolidated together. I think the current silos have created a lot of misdiagnosis both who aren't Autistic and those who are slightly.

daveddd
02-18-10, 01:25 PM
This really makes a lot more sense. It will be better once all the Autism, Asperbers & PDD-NOS material is all consolidated together. I think the current silos have created a lot of misdiagnosis both who aren't Autistic and those who are slightly.

agreed , i have met some "aspies" who were nothing more then a little socially awkward , although mainly self-diagnosed

this statement means no offense , but i think things like the aspy community , just give people who arent social butterflys an identity or maybe just a place to fit in

solsken
02-19-10, 09:22 PM
My oldest son has been diagnosed with ASD in addition to his ADHD. He used to flap alot but only does it occasionally now. He has only drawn pictures of ships since he was 2 or 3 years old. Each school day he brings a picture home, he says "Look what I drew mom!" :p He has been fixated on the Titanic for years, as well as all things Pirates. He has begun branching out to the Civil War and is now drawing the Monitor and the Merrimac. :)

I listened with interest to NPR's story on the changing diagnosis. I am sure some people will have very strong feelings. I won't. I truly think labels are only that, labels.

mctavish23
02-19-10, 09:44 PM
As someone who uses the DSM -IV TR everyday, I'm not surprised.

It looks like an attempt to simplify things that essentially overlap to the point of defining

the same problem.

I hope it works out that way.

I'm also intrigued with the committee's thoughts on "Bipolar" as well.

Excellent thread thought(s).

Thanks all.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)