View Full Version : Sensory overstimulation


mark
04-14-03, 07:47 PM
Anybody else have trouble with the "feeling" or fit of clothing? I cant stand having clothes that fit too tight or that are too loose for that matter. And the labels, gawd they drive me nuts. The irritation from having things touching my skin really bothers me. Hanes just introduced some new undershirts that dont have a label sewn into the back collar. Instead, its printed on the material. Thank you Inspector #54!

Sleeves too tight or shirt collars too tight also get me annoyed. And I cannot deal with starched shirts at all. Uhhhhh, I'm getting stressed just thinking about these things.

Tara
04-14-03, 07:54 PM
I can't wear turtlenecks and I also hate socks. My mother used to think I was just lazy when I was younger and wouldn't wear socks with sneakers in other shoes. I just hated how they made my toes feel. I'm glad the weather is getting warmer and will be able to my sandles more...

Lafnalot
04-14-03, 07:59 PM
This has always been an issue for me, now it is for my youngest also. Every single thing you have mentioned, plus some. Socks? the seem on socks make my daughter and me nuts, we have to wear them inside out.I cant wear my rins for any length of time, so I put them on a chain. That worked a little, til i couldnt take that any more either. Ce la vie

mark
04-14-03, 08:29 PM
Lafnalot, you could stand to wear a chain? Man, that would never work for me. The idea of something hanging around my neck all day drives me to the brink. Wearing a watch is okay for me, but it has to fit just right.

Joanrdtobe
04-14-03, 10:07 PM
Is it okay to say the word pantyhose?? or how about the good old days of garter belts...men you've had it easy....or does it have to be clothing both sexes wear? Seriously...I swim a lot and sometimes my bathing suit feels strange on me especially when I'm in the water...I think it's the spandex....yes, the spandex...Yuck...and nylon, any nylon makes me itch....and I never could stand to wear hats especially if they tied under my neck to stay on....yuck...and I grew up in New England.....and mittens -- not gloves -- were SO confining....I couldn't hold anything....bathing caps..the only thing bathing caps did was give me a headache...remember the kind of boots you actually wore with your shoes still on? What a joke....felt gross....Scarves...now they're itchy and confining....May I breathe please...:) Oh and I have wide feet...what did I ever do before they came out with wide width shoes?? I have no idea...

Andrew
04-14-03, 11:33 PM
You're not alone. Here's a very interesting poll on ADD and Hypersensitivity - http://www.add.org/main/treatment/pollmj.htm

Spirit
04-15-03, 09:54 AM
For me it's wearing my jewelry for any length of time...I only wear it now when I go some where. Panty hose here too..can't stand them. Tight collars on shirts, and tight cloths period. Covers over my shoulders I feel smoothered. Hubby cuddling me too much..I can't breath. Too much noise drives me nuts also. Noise when I'm driving..grrr. I can handle the radio on but down low. There are many things that over stimulate me.

Energizer_Bunny
04-15-03, 08:18 PM
Oh gosh, do I know about this one.

Sometimes tags, and anything that itches. I like soft clothing. I don't even like to wear long sleeves in the winter time........I hate turtle necks. I don't like tight shirts. I can't figure out how some fo the girls these days wear such tight T-shirts. I don't like my tennis shoes tied loose. I don't like to feel my hair flopping around on my head......I know, it sounds weird, but it bugs me......even my bangs, I can't stand to let them hang the way they were cut, I have to push them to the side. I also have trouble with my glasses. I am getting them adjusted it seems like 3 times a week because I don't like how they feel on my face. I sometimes work with a headset on for my CD player and the cord will touch my arm. It can drive me in sane, I start brushing my arm off like a bug got on me........

Another big issue for me is noise. I hate noise. It can be very painful, but this is a whole different topic.

aforceforgood
04-16-03, 02:20 AM
Yeah, and what's with the boxer manufacturer AFFIXING the tag right on the elastic waist part, where it's going to get ground into your skin by the pants and belt? Why not just put some sandpaper there and be done with it, that would amount to about the same effect. All that's doing is reminding me which brand NOT to buy every time I turn them inside out to wear 'em.

Lafnalot
04-16-03, 06:59 AM
While I havent worn any boxers recently ( ;) ) I can relate to the sandpaper theory. Womens under wear, whether a bra, panties or some other such contraption that men enjoy seeing on us, has lace.Lots and lots of lace. Scratchy, pokey, rash inducing lace. Ok can we say torture chamber?

Spirit
04-16-03, 12:09 PM
LMBO..and we are constantly reminded that men were the inventors of such contraptions..lmbo too funny :D

Energizer_Bunny
04-16-03, 02:16 PM
And that reminded me of what else I had forgot to add. Whenever I get home from work, I am out of my clothes and usually in whatever I will be wearing to bed that night.

Maybe all of us ADD women can go back to how it was in the 70's and burn our bras.

Spirit
04-16-03, 02:21 PM
LMBO..I can only hope I can start a huge bonfire with my bras..guess I could use them this winter to heat the house. :p

And yes..I also would come home and change into my jammies or a pair of sweat pants and a t-shirt just in case we got company.

misclee
04-16-03, 10:45 PM
Yes, my mother still remembers the "bumps in my socks:)"

mark
04-17-03, 12:25 AM
Hey aforceforgood, you posted the following line:

"All that's doing is reminding me which brand NOT to buy every time I turn them inside out to wear 'em."

I hope you mean turning them inside out so the tag doesnt bother you, because if your trying to get an extra day's wearing from the same pair, Ewwwwwww!

Welcome to the boards aforceforgood!

Andrew
04-17-03, 11:46 PM
Originally posted by Lafnalot
...Womens under wear, whether a bra, panties or some other such contraption that men enjoy seeing on us, has lace.Lots and lots of lace. Scratchy, pokey, rash inducing lace. Ok can we say torture chamber?

I'm so glad I gave all that up ;) LMBO

andrea76
04-18-03, 04:56 PM
ever feel completely liberated at the end of the day. . . you know the first five seconds after walking in the door.

a show of hands:
who whips of their bras in those first five seconds?
who utters sigh of utter relief?

Spirit
04-19-03, 02:37 PM
Me andrea..lmbo
Can't wait to get to el'natural.

Gil
03-09-04, 01:39 PM
I can't stand tags on my clothing, and textures overstimulate me. I am often petting what my girlfriend is wearing (while she's wearing it and no, it isn't a sexual thing) Also going into a grocery store with all the bright lights and colors, whoa, that's an overstimulated day for me. It's one way for me to get out of a depressed mood, too. I just let myself get overstimulated by purposely going to a place that will overstimulate me. WHAM! suddenly I'm grinning like an idiot, staring off into space, and totally amused by all the colors.

MrsBulldog720
03-09-04, 06:34 PM
I'm the same way mark...wish i didn't have to wear clothes @ all.
I'm real sensitive 2 noise (esp. in my left ear) and light (in my left eye) too.

Beep!
03-25-04, 04:52 PM
Last weekend my fiance pointed out that my panties were on inside out. I hadn't thought about it before but they always are! The seams and tag drive me nuts so I unconsciously put them on with those horrible little tortures on the outside.

steveb
03-25-04, 08:07 PM
Tags, tight necklines, and I also remember the bumps in the sweatsocks.
They all drive me mad.
I often remove my tags.

Also, any hint of a short peice of itchy hair left from a haircut and I go nuts.
I will usually go shirtless the rest of the day after a haircut.

galexica2020
04-03-04, 10:04 PM
I cannot stand perfume and cologne, I am so sensitive that when I am around people that where it, I feel that I just drank their perfume/cologne. It gives me this burning sensation in my lungs and throat. I am also sensitive to people in big crowds, such as walking in shopping malls, and retail stores, I become very overwhelmed & begin to become lightheaded. I choose to shop when the store opens at their early hours and feel more at ease when nobody is around me.

Galexica

neuroangel
04-22-04, 03:03 AM
Anything with tags is a torture...none of my shirts or panties have tags left in them. I almost never wear a bra, that feels like it's crushing my chest and it just rubs the wrong way...it is the proper size though. I don't like to wear shoes, but if I go all day without wearing them, I have to really force myself to put them on the next time. So I end up wearing them most of the time, I slip them off alot during class though.

Certain smells really get to me. A lot of people have a certain kind of scent, I'm not sure what it is, and I hope I'm not crazy, but I don't like being in someone's arms or anything because of it. Bathrooms drive me nuts, the smell of urine is so strong to me. Incense and perfume gag me. If I'm in a closed space with someone who's got perfume on, it's hard for me to breathe and I have a foul taste in my mouth.

Fake lights bother me after a while, TV and moniters too. I don't really like conversing verbally, because I don't like listening to myself talk sometimes, and I hate it when others keep talking...it just kind of drones out. Loud noises and high pitched sounds bother me, even the computer's hum is bothersome at times. And I'm easily startled.

I think that covers everything...phew.

Cyndi

addDani
05-06-04, 11:26 PM
Jeez, I guess I never realized just how many things bother me! lol

I hate, HATE, hate the TV - I can only stand it in small doses. It drives me nuts when one of my family members is watching it in the same room that I'm in. Needless to say, everyone has their own TV now. :-)

Steve - hair clippings after a haircut bother me too. Especially on the back of the neck. Going to the hairdresser is always so much fun for me - one of my least favorite sensations is water dripping down the back of neck onto my back and soaking my clothing. No matter how careful I am at the hairdresser's, invariably a trickle of water somehow finds its way down.

I also don't like the sensation of my hair being on the back of my neck, but unfortunately for me, I look better in long hair. I usually keep it up in a ponytail.

And my glasses drive me to distraction. I don't like the feel of them on my face so I'm constantly pushing them up on my head. (They're the most expensive hairband I own.) Then I run around the house asking people if they've seen my glasses. Oy!

Teach35
05-31-04, 02:50 PM
Gil, I couldn't believe that you actually like going to a store to get overstimulated! I'm glad it can be a positive thing for you.

When I go to a store, I also get overstimulated, but it's the opposite feeling for me, I get overwhelmed and indecisive and tired and depressed. There's too many choices and too many paths to follow. I find I have to systematically route myself through a section and look at every piece of clothing or other item. I still don't usually find something I like.

And I _cannot_ go shopping if I don't have something in mind to get, and have it written down. And forget about shopping with someone who loves it, drives me nuts, trying to follow them around and pay attention to what they're looking at. Unless they're acting as my personal shopper, in which case, I can get into it. Sometimes I just find a place to sit and stare off into space, like my Dad used to, hmmmm....

Vero
05-31-04, 03:15 PM
Everytime I come here you guys blow my mind! I had this weird phobia of grocery stores all my life. When I was younger and my mom made me go shopping with her it was torture. I can do department stores as long as I have something in mind to buy. But I usually will try a few things on and if I don't find anything, I bolt out of there. I have always taken tags out of clothes. And I don't watch too much tv. One thing I've found is I can't talk on the phone with the tv on. I usually mute it when someone calls me. I can't concentrate on the phone conversation with the tv noise. I always de-bump my socks before I wear them too!

Jellybean
05-31-04, 08:25 PM
All I can say is everything, sounds, light and textures, and the ramblings of my own brain distracts me.

I hate wearing lots of clothes, winter stuff.
I try to find shirts with built in boob support. I hate straps and the pokey labels.
I always abandon my shoes/slippers when I can. My son and I keep our slippers in the car. Just for walking in stores, and such. We are always barefoot around here.

Jewell
08-04-04, 06:16 PM
Lately I've tried to see the hypersenistivity of my senses as a positive.
I love smells. And neuroangel I know what your talking about when you say people scents. I've gotten to know people by their "scents" and I love it. Once I was resting with my head down and someone I know pasted by me and I knew who it was just by their scent.... i don't know why I like reconizing peoples scents and smells in general so much.
My tv has this buzzing noise from the screen, I hate it, nobody in my family can here it... I'm ok with it most of the time but late at night it drives me crazy.
A few years ago I used to hate it when people would touch me... it was just too much for me. Some of my close friends broke me of it this year though. I have a girl and guy friend who are really touchy and I had to get over it... but now touching is just very comforting to me and I love it when people touch me (its not a sexual thing or anything) I've just been deprived of it for so long... I still don't touch much though, I don't feel comfortable with touching someone unless they are the ones to extend it first. I can be so afraid of it... such a weird thing touch is... or maybe its just me thats weird.

lotsofconfusion
08-22-04, 02:56 AM
Thank God I'm not alone!! My mother was dressing my little cousin today and when she put the socks on, she reminded me how much I used to hate socks when Iwas a kid. The seam always bothered me, the way it layed across my toes and the "bumps" at the end! I used to get on the bus crying over it... I guess I've just got used to them although there are still some socks I won't wear. Forget about sweaters, they aggrivate me to no end... very pinchy and sometimes tight! Tight turtle necks are forbidden as are any tight clothing. I can't stand stickyness either. The worst is after swimming in the ocean, so sticky and the sand doesn't help either. Any type of body lotion can NOT be put on before getting dressed unless it is before bed. Necklaces have to be worn outside of clothing, can't have it resting on my chest, especially if it swings around. I can't stand wet clothing because it "clings".
Wow! I had no idea how many things actually bother me. I could keep going but I'm sure you've all got other things to do... phew....

aularian
09-06-04, 01:34 AM
A few years ago I used to hate it when people would touch me... it was just too much for me.

I completely understand this, I hate when people touch me, it makes me incredibly uncomfortable. Although I tend to wonder if it is just because I did not have a touchy family at all and i am not used to it, or if it is some kind of hypersensitivity.

I have this thing where I hate the feeling of the bottom of my shirt on my stomach. I used to think it was because I was paranoid about people seeing my stomach, but even when I am wearing a jumper over the top it still drives me insane and I am constantly pulling down my tshirt or singlet. I also hate the feeling of loose tops so i always have to wear a singlet underneath even in summer. (also I have all that stuff with the tags etc you all talk of) I hate lace but love sports bras :)

vermillion
09-06-04, 05:29 AM
I can not wear jewellery, even tough I like to have shiny stuff in my closet (cheap stuff).Shopping is torture for me.
People touching me,hair touching my neck, jewellery,watches,any shoes other than my sneakers makes me insane.
And there's another thing, if anyone touches my belly button by anychance I'd knock them down in a second... Is there a way to remove it with surgery?

aularian
09-06-04, 08:25 AM
I can not wear jewellery, even tough I like to have shiny stuff in my closet (cheap stuff).Shopping is torture for me.
People touching me,hair touching my neck, jewellery,watches,any shoes other than my sneakers makes me insane.
And there's another thing, if anyone touches my belly button by anychance I'd knock them down in a second... Is there a way to remove it with surgery?
ooh that's funny i completely agree! I can't stand it when someone touches my belly button. And not to mention I am the most ticklish person you ever met in your life. Even just tap me on the side (or anywhere else on my body for that matter) in the friendliest of ways and you are likely to get an elbow to the head (not intentional of course). I have given a few people injuries from tickling me, though I'd say they deserved it!

Jewell
09-07-04, 05:07 PM
yeah, my family wasn't a very touchy family. My parents would always tell the kids not to touch each other... it just makes me mad. I see other families and they're always hugging. And it takes me a long time to get comfortable enough with someone for me to touch them.

vermillion
09-07-04, 05:39 PM
In my family everybody hugged everybody everysecond...Discusting and sickening. I ran away from sloppy kisses all my life:rolleyes:

BrightLight
10-24-04, 01:29 AM
Thread's a little old but I'll still post.

I want to say thank you to all of you who have just validated the intense hatred I had for socks when I was young! I never knew why. Much like my new ADHD Dx at 28yrs, it gives me new insight.

I drove my mother crazy. Put the shocks and shoes on. Turn around and I have them pulled off. I always complained the "bumps" felt "funny". The big seams killed me. My pulling my shoes and socks off 100 times a day killed my mom. She would have me and my two older sisters all dressed except my socks/shoes. She'd wait until we got where were going and then throw them on me.

It is such a long running joke that when my aunt gave me an album of old pictures last X-mas she purposely included one of me in my mom's lap and her trying to wrestle my shoes back on me. I was about 4yrs old.

As adults we can cut our tags out and buy items that bother us the least. As kids you have no say. Though, the ingenuity of an ADHD kid driven crazy by their clothes is impressive.

I barely remember this but my mom still rolls her eyes at the mention of the incident. She bought me a whole new set of socks just before I started kindergarden. I knew I wasn't allowed to take my shoes off at school so I "FIXED" all my socks. She says I came to her with the biggest smile on my face. "Look Mom! I fixed all my socks!" I had got a hold of some scissors and cut the end of the seams off of every pair of socks I owned. Some actually had holes and others just fell apart in the wash. Scratchy toes will prevail!

As an adult with double wide feet, I just buy orthopedically sound shoes that are probably 1/2 size too big. Dr. Martens-love them, Born-squishy magic, anything flat and wide and comfortable. I know they don't look so great to others but they can kiss my patootie! I would wear boxes on my feet if that's what made me feel good.

Anyone else refuse to (inherently unable to) compromise on clothes to fit into fashion?

ADDitives
03-12-05, 12:51 AM
ever since i first wore shoes, i have always had issued about them being too tight. i'd always tell my mum or sister (sister is 16 years OLDER than me) that my toes were all squashed. apparently most people dont have a problem wit this, but i really need that little extra room so i can separete my toes out a little and move them.

mustFocus
03-12-05, 10:45 PM
It's great to read threads like this to know I'm not alone. :)

- Cut tags out of my shirts
- Wear only cotton
- Won't wear sweaters for money
- Don't like sleeves around my wrists
- Socks must be cotton and must not ever slide down my ankle
- Shoes and socks leave my feet as soon as I get home
- Artificial air fresheners are verboten
- Coworkers catch grief if they use nasty scented lotions

I don't like grocery stores but I can survive by wandering around until I find what I need. I used to go with my wife to Sam's Club but after an hour I would be sweating profusely with a headache and a bad attitude. It was especially bad because she has Attention Surplus Disorder and would systematically go down every aisle in order and note prices on nearly every item. EEEEEEEEEEAAAHHH!

speedo
05-30-05, 09:40 AM
I have outlined my experiences. I hope this is helpful to someone....

I have hypersensitivities I was probably born with them. For me, the worst is sound. It was not always as bad as it is now.

Around last August or so I started having troubles with stress and hypersensitivity to sound. By mid December I was having severe troubles with ADD, stress, and unpleasant hypersensitivities.

After running through the gamut of possible organic causes, I eventually learned that I had lost much of my hearing recently and had developed subjective tinnitus with hyperacousus (hypersensitivity to sound) due to damage to my 8th cranial nerve. I was partially deaf and the tinnitus was severely punishing my central nervous system!!!

To make it even more interesting , I was experiencing hypersensitivity to scent on occasion. Over time it became apparent that my most serious issue was sensory overload.

Sound causes stress for me. Especially certain sounds, like vacum cleaners, breaking glass, and the sound of children playing. As the stress accumulates, I become very ADD-like. At that point, I am highly stressed and distracted. Sounds can startle, cause me to feel panicky, and can even cause pain. Sound also has the awful property of forcefully ripping my focus from whatever I am doing and placing it on the sound (this is SO unpleasant).
If the stress continues, all my senses eventually come into play. It can become rather ugly.

I also experience spatial dislocation of sounds (sounds sometimes seem to be coming from the wrong place, or from everywhere). I have recruitment (faint sounds can become very loud). I have had a variety of inner ear effects due to the tinnitus, like rotary vertigo, echoes, LOUD hissing, or ringing in the ears, etc (yes, Meniers disease is suspected).

Places that are visually and acoustically busy are toxic to me. When I am in overload, someone bumping into me can startle me, or even cause me to feel so stressed that I feel panicky. Someone suddenly poking me with a finger is equally unpleasant. A gentle caress with the palm of your hand will cause me to tense up initially, but I relax immediately, and I find it soothing. If I am not expecting to be touched, I might tend to feel panic for a second or two if you walk up behind me and touch me or hug me.

My sense of scent can suddenly become unpleasntly sensitive. It seems to vary over time, but certain odors are sometimes so unpleasant I want to gag (I really hate the scent of hummus a lot). At times, certain scents will trigger emotions (this is the oddest thing I have experienced).

Hypersensitivity to taste is infrequent, usually interesting, and enjoyable. Most food textures are not too offensive, but I *really* hate dried tomatoes, sorbe, and dill pickles (among others).

As to the question of "when" amd "how severely" I have sensory problems, it is variable. It all depends...My stress levels have a lot to do with it. I think it also depends on my environment. If I find myself in a toxic setting and can't get away from it, I know it is going to be bad day....

Once I am in overload, it is not fun and then I am stuck with it until I can remove myself from the situation. From there I always experience shutdown and recovery (eventually), but I might be very stressed for up to a full day after the overload.

When I am in overload, visual scenes are sometimes disturbing in a way that I can not describe. Even shadows can become annoying. Eye contact in a room full of people can be difficult, and stressful. Polarized sunglasses seems to help visual overload a little (one aspie tells me that sunglasses with a purple tint are best, but I've not tried it).

Sound is the big driver of my overload. On one occasion I was so assaulted by static on my cellphone that all I could see was a white flash, and I experienced intense pain that caused me to drop the telephone (this actually happend to me twice in one day). Before I was managing my hypersensitivity , a telephone ringing could drive me into hysterics. That is the worst that I have experienced.

Recently , medication has controlled my hypersensitivity such that I can manage, but now I have phonophobia to deal with (because of past pain with sound). Sounds still cause stress, but most of the pain is gone. I can still experience sensory overload just as eaisly as ever, but I am now free to manage because I am not driven to total distraction by continual pain and confusion.

If the sensory overload continues, I become exhausted, and start to experience what I call "shutdown". I become lethargic, uncoordinated, and it is hard to think, speak, etc. It still hurts, still feels stressful, but I just stop responding. That usually lasts an hour or two and then I start to recover. The only way for me to avoid sensory overload is to rely on a combination of medications, and to try to manage my stress levels with exercise, and avoiding toxic situations as much as I can. Even with that, there are satill problems from time to time. Overall, I have no complaints.

When I was finally diagnosed with ADD, I began asking questions of myself. I eventually realized that I had always been mildly prone to sensory issues.

As a teenager, being in a place with lot of people was overwhelming due to the scent, sight, and sounds of so many people. Furthermore, in such a situation, maintaining eye contact with people was difficult and stressful. I hated strobe lights, I hated anything smelly, I hated synthetic fabrics. I was very picky about food. I was a loner, and obsessed with technology. I had a few friends and did not usually operate outside of my small social circle. I do not recall haveing many issues with ADD... etc.. I suspect it was there all the time and I never knew it.

I recently realized that all of my clothes are cotton. I still can not stand to wear synthetics. Tags and seams are not very bothersome to me. I still hate strobe lights. I am less picky about food. I now realize that I have instinctively developed coping skills over the years and had adapted to what I thought was "normal", until my hearing loss made it all painfully obvious to me.

A recent conversation with an old girfriend revealed that she knew I had hypersensitivities and she had simply assumed that I was mildly autistic. I never realized it. I had never asked, and she never told me. In fact, nobody had told me.

I had always known that I was just "different" and never took it any further than that. In a way, it was amusing that I had gone so long and never had a clue as to my own tendencies.

Now, I am faced with learning to cope all over again as my once minor symptoms are now in-my-face and kicking my butt all over the place. There is no missing my symptoms now.
I'm so thankful that I was able to find the organic cause for why things suddenly got so awfully bad, and I am incredibly thankful for my friends and for the wonderful, corageous people in this forum. It takes a lot of guts to face this stuff every day, and you guys do it with grace and style.
I have learned so much from you all.

Me :D

speedo
06-26-05, 06:11 PM
You just made me realize that I really dislike the seams and bumps in socks. I sometimes fuss with positioning a sock on my foot and often rotate the sock on my foot to move the bumps or seams to a different spot.

It is funny how you don't notice these things until you look for them.

Me :D


Thread's a little old but I'll still post.

I want to say thank you to all of you who have just validated the intense hatred I had for socks when I was young! I never knew why. Much like my new ADHD Dx at 28yrs, it gives me new insight.

I drove my mother crazy. Put the shocks and shoes on. Turn around and I have them pulled off. I always complained the "bumps" felt "funny". The big seams killed me. My pulling my shoes and socks off 100 times a day killed my mom. She would have me and my two older sisters all dressed except my socks/shoes. She'd wait until we got where were going and then throw them on me.

It is such a long running joke that when my aunt gave me an album of old pictures last X-mas she purposely included one of me in my mom's lap and her trying to wrestle my shoes back on me. I was about 4yrs old.

As adults we can cut our tags out and buy items that bother us the least. As kids you have no say. Though, the ingenuity of an ADHD kid driven crazy by their clothes is impressive.

I barely remember this but my mom still rolls her eyes at the mention of the incident. She bought me a whole new set of socks just before I started kindergarden. I knew I wasn't allowed to take my shoes off at school so I "FIXED" all my socks. She says I came to her with the biggest smile on my face. "Look Mom! I fixed all my socks!" I had got a hold of some scissors and cut the end of the seams off of every pair of socks I owned. Some actually had holes and others just fell apart in the wash. Scratchy toes will prevail!

As an adult with double wide feet, I just buy orthopedically sound shoes that are probably 1/2 size too big. Dr. Martens-love them, Born-squishy magic, anything flat and wide and comfortable. I know they don't look so great to others but they can kiss my patootie! I would wear boxes on my feet if that's what made me feel good.

Anyone else refuse to (inherently unable to) compromise on clothes to fit into fashion?

AnnAnnAnn
06-26-05, 08:15 PM
Wow--

Speedo, as I read your post, I wondered if autism was a factor. Hmm, is ADD/HD a mild form of autism?

I can identify with many of the sensitivities to some degree.

Luckily, I feel physically numb most of the time. I do hate to shop, the smell and the colors get to me. Plus, I think it's boring and time-consuming.

I am tone deaf, so most sounds don't bother me but I don't like sensory overloads of any kind.

I do recognize the "shutdown" reaction. What I used to do was "zone-out." I would find myself looking in the direction of the TV, a picture, a scene out the window, or something, and my mind would go somewhere else. I don't do it as much any more because I am more conscious that I can zone-out and I try to see what the trigger is--stress is usually the culprit. Plus, I got rid of my TV -- just too distracting and often found much of the content worthless.

Bright Light--your story reminded me of how much I hated to dress up when I was young. My poor mom who loves dresses and frills had a kid who would rather climb a tree than wear a dress. I hate bras -- I wear men's sleeve-less undershirts. Been doing that for years before it became fashionable. Also, I used to use a knapsack for purse wwwwwway before they became fashionable. I hate purses.

I can dress up and if the dress is right for me as well as the accoutrements -- hose, slip, shoes, purse, jewelry, etc. I enjoy it. What I don't like is if I get any excessive attention. I vividly remember a holiday party where I wore a nice dress and when people starting complimenting me, I sought out a back room and kept myself busy with the computer. It's hard to explain how it felt but it scared me and I was a grown woman at the time.

I can't be sure why I am uncomfortable if people I don't really know touch me. Not sure it's AD/HD but it does give me pause when I see that others feel similarly.

Hasta Luego, Ann

speedo
06-26-05, 10:13 PM
You sure cover a lot of ground Ann...

Wow--

Speedo, as I read your post, I wondered if autism was a factor. Hmm, is ADD/HD a mild form of autism?


No, ADHD is NOT a form of autism. Sometimes aspies will turn up with ADD/AD
and the diagnosis for aspergers will be missed because they are highly funcional an symptoms may be masked by the ADD.

I have considered asperger's syndrome as a possibility. If I do have it, I am very high functioning, as I do not have many of the obvious traits. I have noticed that everything ADD for me seems to revolve around sensory issues and stress levels. I do score very high on the 101 question aspie quiz, but it still could be ADD that causes me to score highly. I function rather well, I holddown a good job and socialize with friends. My hypersensitivities do make me a bit of a shut-in, and I wish that could be different, but I think I'll just have to live with it. The effect on my personal life since my symptomes worsened has been rather awful.



I can identify with many of the sensitivities to some degree.

Luckily, I feel physically numb most of the time. I do hate to shop, the smell and the colors get to me. Plus, I think it's boring and time-consuming.


I hate shopping. It is too overwhelming and I feel very stressed afterward.


I am tone deaf, so most sounds don't bother me but I don't like sensory overloads of any kind.

I have high frequency hearing loss, hyperacusus, tinnitus, etc... My hearing is fubar ...


I do recognize the "shutdown" reaction. What I used to do was "zone-out." I would find myself looking in the direction of the TV, a picture, a scene out the window, or something, and my mind would go somewhere else. I don't do it as much any more because I am more conscious that I can zone-out and I try to see what the trigger is--stress is usually the culprit. Plus, I got rid of my TV -- just too distracting and often found much of the content worthless.


Yes, I "check out" a lot. I have always "daydreamed" a lot, even as a kid. Some things will zone me out pretty fast. I have not identified any in particular... I never thought about it before. I bet I do have some things that will routinely affect me like that.

You seem to have similar reactions to myself... I got rid of my TV years ago. It is nothing but a big energy sink.


Bright Light--your story reminded me of how much I hated to dress up when I was young. My poor mom who loves dresses and frills had a kid who would rather climb a tree than wear a dress. I hate bras -- I wear men's sleeve-less undershirts. Been doing that for years before it became fashionable. Also, I used to use a knapsack for purse wwwwwway before they became fashionable. I hate purses.


Yes, bright lights are stressful. Sometimes flickering fluorescent lights can be very annoying.

Well, you might as well be comfy.. so dress to suit yourself.


I can dress up and if the dress is right for me as well as the accoutrements -- hose, slip, shoes, purse, jewelry, etc. I enjoy it. What I don't like is if I get any excessive attention. I vividly remember a holiday party where I wore a nice dress and when people starting complimenting me, I sought out a back room and kept myself busy with the computer. It's hard to explain how it felt but it scared me and I was a grown woman at the time.


It sounds to me like you are shy and do not take compliments well. That is not an unusual trait for someone with ADD. Perhaps you are simply midest and shy. It is no sin, either way.

I hate wearing a suit, and people tell me I look great in one, but I cringe when they do say it. I mostly wear cotton. T-shirts and bluejeans. I prefer comfort to style.


I can't be sure why I am uncomfortable if people I don't really know touch me. Not sure it's AD/HD but it does give me pause when I see that others feel similarly.



Umm.. my sense of touch can become acute when I'm overloaded. I have instructed my friends in the "proper" way to touch me so that I do not startle so badly. I love people, and I wish being touched did not cause me to react negativley. But sometimes it gives me the creeps, and always makes me feel tense, unless I am expecting it from someone I really like being touched by, AND as long as it is done just a certian way. (I guess I'm picky :) )

Poke me, and I may startle, and jump. Usually I do not externalize it much. Touch me with the palm of your hand and rub gently, and I tense up at first, then relax, and all is well.

As I understand it, about 20 % of people who have ADD/ADHD have hypersensitivities.
I have also read that about 20% of people with ADD/ADHD are thought to actually have asperger's syndrome.



Hasta Luego, Ann
[QUOTE]

Hasta manyana senorita!

Me :D

sgolden5374
06-28-05, 03:37 PM
Speedo,

My daughter's therapist just recently told me that because they are finding that ADHD kids are likely to have some of the indicators for Asperger's they are going to include those most common indicators on the new evaluation.

Both, my daughter and myself, suffer from sensory issues. I cannot tolerate noise (I also have tinnitis (sp?) and will be looking into it more since I read your post) and some clothing and touch makes me crazy. My daughter seems to be the same.

speedo
06-28-05, 06:56 PM
Thanks for the tip about Adders with aspie like symptoms! Maybe that is my case. I should get tested and find out.

My pet theory at present is that some people are very highly functioning aspies and if they have persistent sensory probllems it can cause sufficient stress for them to appear to be add-like.


Attacking my sensory issues as a bioogical problem instead of as a neurological problem has helped me a lot. Go to an audiologist and get a baseline test done.
Then go to a hearing specialist and seek his advice.
When you are done with all of that , return to your doctor with the new information.

Tinnitus can be caused by many things, so see your doctor. Subjective tinnitus is almost impossible to treat because it can not be measured and the effectiveness of any treatment is also subjective and defies measurement.

My audiologist found my hearing loss, and then the hearing specialist confirmed that I did have major damage to the 8th cranial nerve in my left ear. I was told that there was not much that could be done for me, At that point I started researching and found that an informal test of neurontin had been made on a small group of people with subjective tinitus with favorable results. I asked my doctor to be placed on neurontin and he granted my request. So far it has helped a lot. Be advised that I personally know one person who said that neurontin made their tinnitus WORSE. For me, I had less pain from sound right away, but sound still causes stress. After several weeks, the ringing in my ears was noticably reduced and pain from sound was mostly absent. If I am late with my neurontin for several hours, I often get an increase in the loudness of my tinnititus.

After the "noise" of sound induced pain was reduced, I began noticing the properties of my sensory problems and was able to develop coping strategies that now seem to be helping.

My theory that my add-like symptoms were caused by stress induced by sensory issues seems to be true. Once the neurontin took effect I began to notice that my sensory problems are rather complex. As I have said befoe, It seems that all of my issues revolve around sensory issues. Sound causes stress, and the stress leads to worsening sensory issues. If the external stress continues, I end up in a state I could fcall "full blown" sensory overload. If that persists, I can become rather manic and distracted (very add). Eventually I become exhausted and go into a shutdown phase that lasts an hour or more. In that state, I don't react to much. Sounds still causes stress, or even pain, but I just don't react to it much. I become lethargic and uncoordinated. After a while, I recover and all is better.

I have read that a hearing loss leading to subjective tinnitus can lead to add-like symptoms, especially in people who have a tendency to have their senses closely coupled to their emotions (limbic system issues).

My theory is that, in my case , the autonymous circuits in my brain are trying to "fix" my assymetrical hearing loss. The end result is a lot of neurological activity, and I end up with ringing in my ears. The excess activity eventually starts spilling over into the limbic system and possiblty basal ganglia and I start having severe issues with sensory input.

Me :D

Speedo,

My daughter's therapist just recently told me that because they are finding that ADHD kids are likely to have some of the indicators for Asperger's they are going to include those most common indicators on the new evaluation.

Both, my daughter and myself, suffer from sensory issues. I cannot tolerate noise (I also have tinnitis (sp?) and will be looking into it more since I read your post) and some clothing and touch makes me crazy. My daughter seems to be the same.

Zulu
07-20-05, 08:27 AM
I've got the usual 'tag' disorder which usual results in shirts and t-shirts been worn over my head (if at all) when i'm at home.

I also can't wear any Jewelry, even and especially watches (lol, talk about compounding a time keeping problem)

And finally yeah i dislike unexpected/uninvited touching, with my weak spot being my shoulders. As soon as they are touched i'm almost ready to swing, its scary.

speedo
07-20-05, 07:38 PM
I like big, baggy cotton T-shirts. If they are tight I don't like them.
I even found some that have no tags. :p

Being touched bugs me a lot when I am overloaded. At all times I hate being touched unexpectedly. I really dislike conversations with people who are touchy-feely. It makes me feel tense. I tolerate it because I know it is my messy neurology, not theirs...

Me :D

Crazygirl79
08-08-05, 12:01 AM
I can relate to this..

1: I hate labels on T-shirts etc as they irritate me.
2: I hate the feel of wool.
3: I hate the feel of any materials that produce feelings of heat and sweat
4: I hate the feeling of sweat period!
5: I sometimes don't like people touching me as it feels irritating but other times I'm ok with it.

My main sensory issues are with touch and heat

ADDitives
09-20-05, 09:38 AM
rings, wet socks, any wet clothing, wet hair, tights socks, a loose or tight watch, hair tied up with a little bit pulling too tight from my head, shoes that are too tight, shoes that only just have enough foot room - I NEED TOE WIGGLE ROOM!! (i have always needed toe wiggle room, i just cant stand to have them all touching and being unable to move them..), strangers brushing past me

i bought 4 new pairs of socks last week. theyre too tight :(

i bought 2 pairs the same a few months earlier. it think i just need to put these new ones through the wash a few times - so i wont wear them for a while and just wash them. i might even put the tops over somethign to stretch them out.

Crazygirl79
09-29-05, 07:45 PM
*rolls eyes* I have sensory issues and maybe SID

Jaycee
09-29-05, 09:55 PM
Good new for those who hate the sock seems, there is a company called Sensory Comfort that sells seamless socks. A bit pricey but worht it.

Also I only buy Haynes T-shirts for my guys now. They Stamp their logo so no tag problem. They also us "french seams" so no raw edges to itch and irritate. I'm sure there are other companies going to this, you just have to look for them.

For kids Old Navy is a tag friendly brand most of the time. Very soft satin tags.

We have bad sensory mornings at our house often, and even though everything is tried on 3 separate times before the tags come off. There are days that they still don't feel right, and we may try on several outfits. My son refuses any kind of socks and tennis shoes that are not a size too big.

speedo
10-02-05, 08:48 PM
Hanes now makes a nice T-shirt called the "Perfect T". It has no tag and the seams are folded over and stitched so that they lie flat and do not rub your skin. :)

I have about a half dozen of them and they are comfy and speedo approved. :p

Me :D

Jaycee
10-02-05, 10:55 PM
:D Haynes Tees "Kid tested--Spedo Approved"

speedo
10-02-05, 11:23 PM
LOL :p

brandilyn
10-06-05, 01:50 AM
I have to fold the corner of my sock over before putting on my shoe.The seam kills me!Its almost unbearable!
Tags on the back of shirts!

*~ §EEK ~*
05-10-06, 05:11 AM
You're not alone. Here's a very interesting poll on ADD and Hypersensitivity - http://www.add.org/main/treatment/pollmj.htm
Is the link in the above quote, a "dead link" for anyone but me????

Thanks,
*~ §EEK ~*
...

Andi
05-10-06, 08:13 PM
The link is dead but here is the results...

http://www.add.org/articles/hypersen.html


HAVING ADD AND BEING HYPERSENSITIVE:
Is There A Connection?

By Mary Jane Johnson



In "The Difficult Child" Stanley Turecki, M.D., describes the difficult child with a low sensory threshold. He states, "...power struggles or tantrums occur over clothes that don't feel right; shoes have to be tied endlessly; tags in the clothing have to be removed; excess sensitivity may be evident to noises, lights, or smells. She refuses to wear a coat in the middle of winter, complaining she is too hot, or will wear only underwear in the house. She is over stimulated in crowded places."

Throughout my life there have been numerous "little" things that have agitated me, but didn't seem to bother anyone else. I am uncomfortable wearing clothing that has elastic at the wrist or waist, or tags in the neck. I wear watches with a loose bracelet bands.

There are countless foods that I avoid because of their texture, rather than how they taste. For example, I love tomato sauce on spaghetti, etc., but just cannot abide eating a raw tomato. A number of fruits are also out because of their peculiar textures. I will eat a raw apple, but cringe at the thought of eating a baked apple. Going out to eat can be bothersome because I need to know what is in everything before I can eat it. I prefer to go restaurants that serve plain homecooked style food, rather than take a chance at some of the fancier restaurants that offer exotic dishes with unknown or unpronounceable names and ingredients. My stomach is sensitive and reacts to unusual or spicy foods, as well as to stress.

Since I was a child I have experienced allergies and upper respiratory problems. I am allergic to certain fragrances, dust and mold, ragweed, flowers, hay, grass, leaves, animal fur, and any kind of nuts (except peanuts which are from a different family)..

My skin is excessively dry, I have excema and often get rashes. In the summer I cannot tolerate being in the sun and have come close to heat prostration numerous times. In the winter, I am constantly cold after the temperature drops and the chilled air makes me hurt all over.

My ears are also hypersensitive and loud, or high-pitched sounds leave my ears ringing. I keep the volume on the radio and TV turned way down (which bothers everyone else in the house because they cannot hear it). If I hear an unusual sound (usually no one else hears it) I cannot focus anything else until I find the source of the sound. Once that is established I can return to what I was doing.

In addition to the above, I am very sensitive to anyone touching me unless I want to be touched. Only just recently have I been able to bring myself to hug and be hugged by friends in a greeting. If anyone holds on to me for too long, I start to panic and begin to feel closed in or claustrophobic. I have difficulty getting on elevators and feel smothered in large crowds.

In an attempt to discover whether this hypersensitivity is more common in people with ADD, I took an "unscientific pole" of 65 ADD adults who attended a recent conference. The results are listed below:

1. Sensitivity to clothing (i.e. elastic, tags) 44%

2. Sensitivity to food textures 6%

3. Allergies 39%

4. Sensitive skin 67%

5. Heat and cold sensitivity 56%

6. Sensitive hearing 50%

7. Sensitivity to being touched 22%

8. Claustrophobia 39%

9. Stomach problems 50%

As you can see everyone poled had one or more of these same traits. I was curious if any other ADD adults share in these same hypersensitivities (or have others not mentioned here)? Below are some comments I received to this article.

Comments From Individuals: Follow-Up Article

It has been several months now since I reported on ADD and hypersensitivity. Since that time I have heard from several ADD adults who suffer some of the same symptoms. One person sent me an article entitled "Social & Emotional Issues of Adults with Sensory Defensiveness" from the Sensory Integration Newsletter published by The American Occupational Therapy Assoc. Many of these same hypersensitivities are mentioned in this article and I will quote from the article as well as what was shared by the readers who wrote to me.

Sensory Integration Newsletter states, "Adults with tactile defensiveness commonly report strong clothing preferences and avoidances, and aversions to clothes with tags, jewelry....may also feel uncomfortable with wool or synthetic materials against the skin....and may be bothered by these aversions to an extreme degree...."

Along those same lines K. wrote in that, "I have to keep my shoes tied tight on my feet....if they are not tight I get frustrated....I find that I constantly re-tie my shoes as tight as possible, during the day."

D. relates, "I agree completely about the elastic....I also do not like sleeves, high collars, knee socks that fall down, tags on the inside of shirts, anything touching my skin that isn't soft or cottony, slacks too tight in the crotch....I hate panty hose....I don't wear my coat in the car, I have a nice thin vest with lots of pockets that I wear while shopping."

In regards to sensitivity to food textures M. shares, "My dad as a child couldn't stand different foods to touch, so my grandmother bought him a compartmentalized plate....

I had to do the same for my son....he stopped picking up wet finger foods or food that made his hands sticky....he wanted a different spoon or fork for each food....he wanted only bland soft foods and to this day there are very few foods he likes....My taste is more sensitive than the others in my family."

D. says, "I am also a picky eater, but I love spicy food. I can't stand browned scrambled eggs and my fried eggs must be perfect."

When it comes to heat and cold sensitivity, M. writes, "If it gets around 70 degrees I'm cold....that's why we live in the desert....my hands and feet seem to always have had poor circulation....my hands get cold inside good leather gloves." K. states, "....especially cold....I need to dress and keep the house warm as soon as cool weather moves in....if I didn't love New England so much I would probably live in a warm climate year round."

The remarks about hearing sensitivity includes: M., clock in the living room because he could her it ticking all the way in his room....my son can sleep through noises but certain frequencies hurt or upset him....I travel with a Sears "sleepmate" white noise machine. I can't sleep without masking the noise. I annoy the heck out of my husband by my ability to hear the TV at the other end of the house....I can't have a ticking clock in the room where I sleep....my dad also has a noise machine." K., "....when trying to focus on things I can't filter out noises....while typing this letter I can hear water dripping in the next room, the refrigerator turning on and off, and a car engine idling outside." And D., "I enjoy loud music, but only when I feel like it. I think that's why people think we are selfish at times."

Sensory Integration Newsletter reports, "Social events....puts the person with defensiveness in an uncomfortable situation....Almost all subjects described the discomfort

experienced when someone's touch takes them by surprise....many subjects describe shaking hands as unpleasant....when the touch or hug from comes from behind, it's effect is multiplied because of the element of surprise....and may need to exert self-control to avoid striking out at the person who touched them."

M. shares, "I don't like being touched....even shaking hands is difficult....It's taken my husband years to learn how to touch me without provoking a negative response. Touching my head or hair is a no no!" A twist on this particular hypersensitivity comes from D. who says, "I am happy to say the hypersensitivity to touch, in the romantic sense, is more often a plus than a minus." And K. adds, "I don't mind shaking someone’s hand, but forget hugging....Whenever someone hugs me, I tense up and my stomach gets tied up in knots....being married my wife loves to be touched....I get all tied up when she hugs me or wants to be hugged or held....It tears me apart because I love my wife and yet for some reason want my space."

"Most subjects described feeling uncomfortable in crowded places such as crowded elevators, buses, or subways, restaurants, stores, malls....shopping is difficult for them", states Sensory Integration Newsletter. K. agrees by saying, "I have difficulty

going into elevators, and detest having to go to malls, food stores, sporting events, etc....I get very overstimulated, overwhelmed and irritable until I'm free from crowded areas." D. states, "I notice that claustrophobia is more evident when I am somewhere I don't like to be, such as in a car on a trip of more than an hour."

In some individuals there seems to be a connection between having ADD and being hypersensitive, as these cases indicate. I would be interested in hearing from others of you who experience some of the same symptoms. I want to thank M., K., and D. for writing and sharing their personal experiences with us.

speedo
05-10-06, 08:30 PM
Thanks for posting that Andi. What I am wondering is; Why are people woith ADHD so often hypersensitive ? What is the mechanism for it ? and How does it work ?

Does anyone have any pointers on this ?

ME :D

*~ §EEK ~*
05-13-06, 09:19 AM
The link is dead.
Thank you Andy for posting the Article (above) for the hyperlink that was dead!

sincerely,
*~ §EEK ~*

dormammau2008
05-13-06, 05:10 PM
hypersensitive ? What is the mechanism for it ? and How does it work ?

i think the e numbers chagen the way the brain works iam hypersensitives dorm