View Full Version : Is there a section here for npd?


brain chatter
03-02-10, 12:05 PM
If there is I can't seem to find it. I'm editing this cause I forgot to do a search and found some threads....sorry...but if you have any good ref.
I would appreciate it...Thanks

I just Wiki'd narcissism, and I have 80% of the coexisting conditions.

So now I'm curious and need to learn more. I don't self-diagnose, that's the doc's job..just want to research more so I can talk to her about it

mike91163
03-02-10, 12:46 PM
Chatter:

Be very, very careful, thinking that you may have NPD. NPD is a disorder in which narcissism affects almost ALL aspects of the person's life, to the detriment of others. Further, due to the very nature of NPD, it's next to impossible for an NPD-afflicted person to even admit that they're wrong.

I don't know how old you are, but do you remember the "Happy Days" TV show? Do you recall when "The Fonz" made a mistake, and just could not spit out the words "I was wrong"? That's sorta an example of NPD at work.

A modest degree of narcissism is not necessarily bad; for example, if you get dressed up in a suit and tie for an event, and look in the mirror and say to yourself "Damn I look good!", that's OK...but to dominate others with a "My way or the highway" attitude ain't.

brain chatter
03-02-10, 01:10 PM
Chatter:

Be very, very careful, thinking that you may have NPD. NPD is a disorder in which narcissism affects almost ALL aspects of the person's life, to the detriment of others. Further, due to the very nature of NPD, it's next to impossible for an NPD-afflicted person to even admit that they're wrong.

I don't know how old you are, but do you remember the "Happy Days" TV show? Do you recall when "The Fonz" made a mistake, and just could not spit out the words "I was wrong"? That's sorta an example of NPD at work.

A modest degree of narcissism is not necessarily bad; for example, if you get dressed up in a suit and tie for an event, and look in the mirror and say to yourself "Damn I look good!", that's OK...but to dominate others with a "My way or the highway" attitude ain't.

Thanks Mike

have been researching more and bipolar fits, but I do have npd qualities,
maybe a lesser degree

all this is so confusing...I'll just discuss it with doc and go from there.

daveddd
03-02-10, 05:10 PM
i would guess 7 out of 10 people could dx themselves with npd based off the internet description

brain chatter
03-04-10, 09:53 AM
i would guess 7 out of 10 people could dx themselves with npd based off the internet description

exactly, thats why I stated I would let the doc do that

i'm just researching, so I can put my "conditions" on paper

or else i'll forget....why am i here

mike91163
03-04-10, 01:44 PM
exactly, thats why I stated I would let the doc do that

i'm just researching, so I can put my "conditions" on paper

or else i'll forget....why am i here

Keep in mind the key words in NPD and other personality disorders:

Pervasive
Preoccupied
Enduring patterns
Long duration
Behavior deviates MARKEDLY from the "norm"

In other words, 24/7/365 (or close to it) thinking and behavior.

Further, it's generally known and accepted that narcissistic and borderline personality disordered persons are usually the LEAST willing of all the PD's to (a) admit to it, and (b) self-diagnosis just isn't in the works...particularly for a narcissist, as to admit to (or even THINK of) a "less than perfect self" would be "ego annihilation".

You have the right idea-put your thoughts to paper, and discuss it with your doctor.

daveddd
03-04-10, 02:08 PM
Behavior deviates MARKEDLY from the "norm"

i think this may cause problems in alot of internet diagnoses

not talking about you brain , you know were buddys

and believe me i read about narcissism all the time, im sure a few comments on here make me sound like one

Lunacie
03-04-10, 02:32 PM
There was a thread here recently where an NT thought her ADHD boyfriend was narcissistic. From the reading I did about ADHD and narcissism I came to the conclusion that because we have to struggle with everyday life, we're just more internally focused than NTs are, but that doesn't make us narcissists.

Wishing you good luck with your diagnosis and working out a treatment plan that will let you be the best you can be.

That used to sound more sincere before it became a buss-phrase for the army eh?

brain chatter
03-04-10, 02:59 PM
thanks all

quick note: my comments on npd are purely stating that i do possess some of the conditions...on a mild or medium level..thats all

coming from my past and dealing with therapists (all kinds) I never took this stuff seriously, so i didn't "tell all" and didn't care to at that time in my life

now i have to, i can't keep fighting it and researching all disorders and what not has brought awareness to things i never thought about that I posssess.

for example: sensory issues

I just want to be as prepared as i can presenting everything to the doc
cause I know it's hard enough for them (especially with missing info.) to try and dx

if you have any other things/suggestions i may need to bring or present to doc...do tell

Lunacie
03-04-10, 05:15 PM
Sensory Issues are very common for anyone with a neurological disorder such as ADHD or Asperger's. I've seen it explained as having to do with executive function and not bieng able to assign a priority to things, therefore some things are much more noticable/annoying, while others fail to grab/hold our attention long enough to submit them to our memory.

Dizfriz
03-04-10, 06:39 PM
One of problems reading descriptions of psychiatric disorders is that we can all fit some of the characteristics for most of the DSM diagnosis. It is part of the human condition and is perfectly normal.

Most of these quite normal behaviors become diagnosable only when the characteristics become extreme and cause major problems in major life activities. The DSM is designed is such a way that only those in the top 5-10% of symptoms would be able to be diagnosed with any given disorder. (There are a few exceptions but this fits most.)

One of the standard things one sees with those who are starting to study psychology is seeing themselves as having many of the disorders they are studying and sometimes becoming quite anxious. I understand that medical students have similar problems.

The main thing is not to be concerned if you fit some of the criteria in the DSM. Pretty much all of us do. To meet some of criteria does not in any way mean that you have a diagnosable disorder.

Read, learn, try to understand what is being discussed but do not try to self diagnose. It just doesn't work for the most part and it will only cause probably unneeded anxiety. If you are very concerned or feel it is causing you problems then see a professional for an assessment. Otherwise just relax and understand it as simply as being a part of who you are.

Dizfriz

brain chatter
03-04-10, 10:14 PM
OK... i am editing this cause i misread someone's post...so all i have is this ...AGAIN!!

FOR THE RECORD...I.. (state your name)...state your name...am not and will not self dx. that is why i will soon have the doc do this!

but if you care to comment...please feel free to do so with any helpful suggestions to bring w/me to tell the doc. thanks all for the input!

daveddd
03-05-10, 08:46 AM
thats why ive stated in threads that taking an online "adhd test" and bringing it to a doctor can be bad news and may not get you properly treated, because anyone can fit in to that category (probably easiest condition to mistakenly self dx, along with aspergers )

but when it involves adhd i got slammed for it

TIRED1
04-19-10, 10:05 AM
Hi Brain

My fairly extensive reading on NPD (but no way an expert) would lead me to suggest you are not likely to have it. I don't know you but one thing I know about those with NPD - they don't accept they have it. The fact that you are even considering it is a sign that you very likely don't.

I recall when I was reading up on it I told my Psycologist I think I have some of these traits. She advised we all have them (all the traits) - but they don't rule our lives. Further it is this lack of accepting they have anything wrong with them which makes treating them very difficult and often futile.

The one key question that stuck out that seems to highlight a strong sense of NPD is - do you consider yourself more special then others around you. My experience has been that those with NPD will usually answer yes. This is not a clinical trial these are only my observations so please treat this info on that basis.

Would be interested in what your Dr. found.

ilostmyself
05-06-10, 12:36 AM
one thing I know about those with NPD - they don't accept they have it. The fact that you are even considering it is a sign that you very likely don't.



I am currently working on my MA is psychology and this is probably one of the best indicators that an individual does not have NPD.

IF the rare occasion occurs when someone with NPD volunteers to go therapy, they are only there to figure out why the issue is not their fault.

ginniebean
05-06-10, 01:40 AM
One of problems reading descriptions of psychiatric disorders is that we can all fit some of the characteristics for most of the DSM diagnosis. It is part of the human condition and is perfectly normal.



Dizfriz

There was a time when I could have diagnosed myself with denge fever just by looking at the symptoms. I'm glad I never saw any symptoms for mental illness. It's a lot harder to convince yourself of a rare and extremely foreign illness. (not impossible)