View Full Version : ADHD diagnosis after a 45 minute appointment?


busymomonli
03-05-10, 01:32 PM
So we had out big appointment Wednesday evening with a pediatric neurologist. We got in, filled out a bunch of forms, and were finally called in by the doctor.

She was nice. She sat us down, went over the questionnaire I filled out in the waiting room, asked a bunch of questions about him, his school history, his behavior, what not. I had brought his report card, progress report, and the ADHD assessment the school did which determined him to be borderline.

She examined him briefly, asked him a few things, and then told us she was ready to call it an ADHD diagnosis and was willing to write a script right there. I guess I thought there would be more testing involved. We were in her office for 45 minutes. I expressed concern over putting him on meds and told her I wanted to think it over because I think I was stunned over such a fast appointment. She gave me one additional form his teacher could fill out if I wanted, and said to call her if/when I wanted her to give me a script.

Does this all sound right to you? I am thinking now that we should schedule a different appointment with a pediatric phychologist. It was ped who sent us to this neurologist. I guess I don't feel any better after this appointment and I thought I would. I have more questions than answers now. She did not offer up any advice on behavior modification techniques or changes in diet or what not.

Derven
03-05-10, 01:36 PM
Sadly this isn't a condition you can definitively test for. It can easily be misdiagnosed because there is never any real proof, only symptoms that match the criteria. It comes down to guess and check. 1. Suspect ADD 2. Try medication 3. Examine result 4. Adjust medication as needed.

Best of luck to you in the matter.

~Bill

MuscleMama
03-05-10, 02:08 PM
I think it sounds ok. She's a neurologist so I don't think she would get into behavior management techniques and dietary changes have not been proven to help. You could get a full neuropsychological evaluation done, but that would not be her area. As I understand it the parent and teacher checklists/forms are the biggest diagnosing factor right now.

tessmesser
03-05-10, 04:27 PM
The diagnosis is made by looking at questionnaires, report cards, and progress notes from parents and teachers. Muscle Mama is correct. There is a computer program that some offices have called Quotient ADHD System that will test specific areas of the diagnosis. (hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattentiveness) and give you are score. This can be helpful for addressing specific areas of concern.

There are also programs such as Cogmed and EEG Neurobiofeedback which some folks have had good results with. You can find more information on Cogmed, etc here: http://primarilyinattentiveadd.com

Codykins
03-14-10, 12:43 PM
My first expierence was the same and why I hesitated to take the diognoses seriously. I then attempted to treat ADHD thru diet unsuccessfully and a year later went to a second neurodevelopmentat Ped and that overview was better, a couple of hours. But altamiatly the same. I first met with one person (for get their title) who ask Cody questions, me questions, had Cody do some pysical things (hopping, running, jumping, standing on one foot, throuwing a ball, etc.) then I met witth the doctor who went thru history, reviewed teachers notes, report cards and the eveluations everyone completed. She also did a medical checkup and had him draw pictures, asked him to write a short story about his vacation and watch his every move - the diagnoses was the same ADHD inattentive but she added hyperactibity although that was no prominiate. I felt more confident with her eveluation and added medication with great results.

LynneC
03-15-10, 01:15 PM
I had a similar experience, but with my son's pediatrician. He asked me and my son questions, asked about his behavior at home and at school, and then asked my son to wait in the lobby while he talked to me. At one point during the exam, my son stood on the exam table (which was built into a wall, not free-standing) to reach up and touch the ceiling panels...the texture looked interesting, he told me later.

When he left the room, the Dr mildly commented that most 7 1/2 year olds would not have stood on the exam table to touch the ceiling. :p

He was ready to write a prescription at that moment...

I had my doubts about the diagnosis, so I looked up the diagnostic criteria in the DSM-IV, and my son does fit the criteria, even though I would describe his ADHD as mild.

We are not medicating at this point; if we decide to in the future, I will get an eval with a neuro doc, but I have no doubt now that he is ADHD.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/diagnosis.html

Beautiful Wreck
04-28-10, 03:49 PM
After a 45 minute evaluation, it was suspected that I was ADHD so I went sent to do a Quotient test.

I like the fact that there's tangible evidence of my disorder that I can see on paper in addition to my symptoms.

I'm also interested in re-testing after being on medication for some time.

jack69lee
05-06-10, 01:07 AM
Why are you going to see a Neurologist? by referral??? Very interesting.

jack69lee
05-06-10, 01:36 AM
So we had out big appointment Wednesday evening with a pediatric neurologist. We got in, filled out a bunch of forms, and were finally called in by the doctor.

She was nice. She sat us down, went over the questionnaire I filled out in the waiting room, asked a bunch of questions about him, his school history, his behavior, what not. I had brought his report card, progress report, and the ADHD assessment the school did which determined him to be borderline.

She examined him briefly, asked him a few things, and then told us she was ready to call it an ADHD diagnosis and was willing to write a script right there. I guess I thought there would be more testing involved. We were in her office for 45 minutes. I expressed concern over putting him on meds and told her I wanted to think it over because I think I was stunned over such a fast appointment. She gave me one additional form his teacher could fill out if I wanted, and said to call her if/when I wanted her to give me a script.

Does this all sound right to you? I am thinking now that we should schedule a different appointment with a pediatric phychologist. It was ped who sent us to this neurologist. I guess I don't feel any better after this appointment and I thought I would. I have more questions than answers now. She did not offer up any advice on behavior modification techniques or changes in diet or what not.


I don't think she is a professional in that area, a neuropsycologist is.


Who Can Diagnose ADHD?


http://www.additudemag.com/adhd-web/article/565.html
http://www.ldonline.org/adhdbasics/diagnosis
http://www.healthcentral.com/adhd/c/1443/25121/diagnose-treat-adhd

ginniebean
05-06-10, 01:44 AM
Neurologists definitely know adhd I'd not be too concerned that it only took 45 minutes.

jack69lee
05-06-10, 02:18 AM
Neurologists definitely know adhd I'd not be too concerned that it only took 45 minutes.

So that one can get his/her prescription of Ritalin (without counceling) in a highly effective manner, guaranteed. hehe.

Well, just don't be happy so early: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81972

ginniebean
05-06-10, 04:19 AM
Does this all sound right to you? I am thinking now that we should schedule a different appointment with a pediatric phychologist. It was ped who sent us to this neurologist. I guess I don't feel any better after this appointment and I thought I would. I have more questions than answers now. She did not offer up any advice on behavior modification techniques or changes in diet or what not.

There are a number of professionals who have different functions and not one of them appears to do it all.

For diagnosis and medication there are psychiatrists and neurologists who rarely do any councelling, or offering of behaviour modification tips because that's not what they do.

Coaches, psychologist (who specialize in ADHD), are there to help with behaviour modification and helping you come to terms with ADHD.

Diet has no bearing on ADHD. Not one scientific study has offerend up any evidence of a 'food connection'.

Here's some information that is well grounded and designed for parents.

http://www.greatschools.org/pdfs/2200_7-barktran.pdf?date=4-12-05



So that one can get his/her prescription of Ritalin (without counceling) in a highly effective manner, guaranteed. hehe.

Well, just don't be happy so early: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81972

Neurologists don't do councelling, they provide diagnosis and medication treatment. I'm at a complete loss about the "hehe".

There is NO treatment of ADHD that is as effective as medications. Not all individuals can tolerate the medications, it also takes time to get the dose and the medication right. Everybody is different.

If there is no evidence of ADHD or not enough evidence then there wouldn't be a diagnosis. It's not 'guranteed' and I'm really concerned about just what you're implying.

If you spent 45 minutes in an office getting diagnosed for diabetes you'd think the doc was being thorough.

doiadhd
05-06-10, 05:42 AM
I had an 45 minute session stretched to an hour,and was a lot more impressed and comfortable than my 20 minute sess. a few months ago.

20 minutes is nothing...it takes me that long to actually finish thinking about the greating...

Now and hour is thrice as long,and I can not complain with this,considering it is not private and that is the usual process.

Within the our,he could see many sides to me,that I would have managed to contain in 20 minutes.

MuscleMama
05-06-10, 08:39 AM
So that one can get his/her prescription of Ritalin (without counceling) in a highly effective manner, guaranteed. hehe.

Well, just don't be happy so early: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81972

What are you talking about? :confused:

doiadhd
05-06-10, 08:46 AM
So that one can get his/her prescription of Ritalin (without counceling) in a highly effective manner, guaranteed. hehe.

Well, just don't be happy so early: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81972

Is this a private joke?

jack69lee
05-06-10, 03:53 PM
Screen and choose the right one for diagnose and treatment

Patients are always surprised to learn that there are very few laws governing the practice of medicine. In fact, a physician who is licensed to practice medicine by his state medical board--whatever his specialty--can legally provide counseling for anyone, even if he or she has absolutely no training in psychology at all!

For instance, just because a doctor calls himself a psychiatrist is no guarantee that he is actually competent to practice psychiatry. For example, legally, a proctologist, a medical doctor certified as a specialist only in disorders of the rectum, can label himself as a non-board certified psychiatrist and do adolescent counseling for drug problems or psychotherapy for suicidal patients-all, with no training in psychology.

A urologist, certified only as a specialist in treating urinary disorders, can again identify himself or herself as a psychiatrist, though non board-certified, and still treat a dangerously bipolar patient; and a dermatologist, actually certified as a specialist only in skin disorders could call himself a psychiatrist and treat your child for ADHD-it is all legal and can be done with no training whatever in psychology or mental health treatment.

These three examples may seem ludicrous. But, remember men and women often get their treatments for depression and anxiety without ever checking, or even caring to see if the medical doctor they are consulting is board-certified in psychiatry?

Do not assume that your medical doctor has the right credentials to perform high quality psychological, counseling or psychotherapeutic treatments. After all, even board certification in psychiatry is no guarantee because most board-certified psychiatrists have only 3 years of specialized training in mental health treatment.

Most of their training is in physiology, chemistry, sciences and general medicine. Therefore, they usually prescribe drugs and do little, if any, counseling or psychotherapy.

Screen your possible therapist with the following 3 questions:

1. Are you certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology?

Make certain that if your doctor labels himself as a psychiatrist that he is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. If he is, that would mean that he has received specialized professional training in providing mental health treatment.

However, remember that the psychiatrists training often has been centered on physical therapies, like the prescribing of drugs and even the use of shock treatments. Psychiatrists sometimes receive only little training in psychotherapy, counseling or psychological testing.

You know what that means. If you consult a psychiatrist the odds are that you will only walk out with a prescription.

Certainly, there are some psychiatrists who are better-rounded in their training and who do some psychotherapy. Nevertheless, odds are that if your doctor has an MD or DO degree, you will walk out with a prescription as your main or only treatment.

2. Are you certified or licensed by the state Board of Psychology as a clinical psychologist?

While there are many thousands of professionals in the United States who do some type of counseling or psychotherapy, only a small percentage of these are the elite practitioners who are licensed to practice clinical psychology!

To become a clinical psychologist requires approximately 6 years of specialized college and graduate training in mental health, counseling, psychotherapy and diagnostic testing. This training is obtained during the last two years of college, followed by approximately 3 to 4 years of specialized graduate school after college.

The psychologist has a doctoral degree in psychology-the study of emotions, thinking and behavior. Psychologists then must undergo the equivalent of a one year internship in clinical psychology- no irrelevant courses in proctology or anatomy, just massive amounts of training in psychological treatment, psychotherapy, family therapy, counseling and specialized diagnostic testing.

Only four years of medical school with training in anatomy, obstetrics and other medical sciences in addition to perhaps a few weekend courses or casual reading about psychology, may be the only education that your non-certified psychiatrist may have. This is certainly no substitute for the psychologists rigorous and highly specialized training over many years.

Remember, you are protected when you consult a clinical psychologist. Why? Because any professional who calls himself a clinical psychologist and is licensed to practice clinical psychology independently, has at least 6 to 7 years of college and graduate school training specifically targeted to psychology.

Unless you check the board certification of the medical doctor you are consulting, however, you may not discover that you have been consulting someone who may have little or even no training in mental health and psychological treatment. In fact, you may discover that you have been receiving dangerously inferior forms of psychiatric care, without ever realizing it.

3. Is the state board of psychology or medicine investigating you for any complaints or malpractice suits?

It is true that even great psychiatrists and clinical psychologists do occasionally get sued. However, you can contact your states professional board to learn whether your therapist has demonstrated a pattern of poor care or inappropriate behavior.

Questions that you are commonly told to ask but which are not relevant:

1. To those calling themselves psychiatrists: Are you board certified?

Nearly all medical doctors are certified by one board or another. If a person has an MD or DO degree, just being board certified in anything is not good enough either. The right question to ask is, Are you certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology?

2. In what state are you licensed to practice psychotherapy and counseling?

Remember states do not specifically license medical doctors to practice psychotherapy and counseling. Absolutely any physician with a valid medical license can legally provide these specialized mental health services-even if they have no psychiatric training at all!

There are no regulations that limit medical doctors to practice within their specialty; not one of the 50 states forbids the practice of psychiatry by non-psychiatrists. The correct question to ask a medical doctor is, Did you complete a formal residency in psychiatry?

3. If the therapist is not a medical doctor, but a clinical psychologist, you are better protected. All you need to ask is, Are you licensed by the state to practice clinical psychology independently?

If the answer is Yes, unlike physicians who just have the medical license, you automatically know that the therapist with the psychology license is highly qualified and has received the rigorous and specialized training necessary to provide expert psychological services.

Not only can just about any medical doctor get a board certification in something, and not only can any licensed physician render any psychiatric service, trained or not, but remember that any physician with $500 can join any number of impressive sounding organizations.

Heck, I know of medical doctors who literally create so called societies and academies so that they can call themselves president and use the title as a marketing gimmick! Remember, when screening therapists that the only credentials that really matter are the license to practice clinical psychology or certification by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

Dizfriz
05-06-10, 05:34 PM
Remember, when screening therapists that the only credentials that really matter are the license to practice clinical psychology or certification by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.This is not correct. Clinical psychologists are not the only ones qualified and licensed to offer therapy. There are a number of licenses that qualify one for this including Licensed Professional Counselor and Clinical Social Worker.

With Physicians, I have seen a number of Pediatricians and Family Practice docs with an good solid knowledge and experience in treating ADHD

What should be a matter of focus is the experience and training the therapist has in the specific area under discussion.

Dizfriz

peachy76
05-11-10, 10:45 PM
45 minutes is certainly not enough unless her tests are proven to be very highly accurate and valid.

unfortunately, they are low on time and speed things up.

but .. if these results make sense to you, must be okay .. I'd get a second opinion to be sure.