View Full Version : Your brain works faster than your mouth can keep up with?


addhil
06-17-04, 11:49 AM
Hi, I've always had the problem of my brain seeming to think faster than my mouth can keep up with, so I'll start on a sentence and the last of my words will come out as just blurbs. When I was diagnosed with ADD, the psychologist suggested I may also have an auditory processing disorder. Could there be a link? Anyone else have this problem?

sam
08-20-04, 08:39 AM
Before I was diagnosed with ADD, my family took me to a speech specialist in Cananda as I had problems speaking. Like you, my mouth couldn't keep up with my brain. Now a days, people comment on how fast I talk and I sometimes mix words together as before I can speak, Ive already thought of other words that could be use alternatively. Just comes out as a big ol' jumble :-) I just have to force myself to speak slowly and I don't have a problem, but if I get excited or nervous I start to stutter hehe.

lotsofconfusion
08-20-04, 11:18 PM
Auditory processing is how you take in information. Speech is more like "output" (talking, writing, etc). I believe there is a name for what you are describing but unfortunately I am unable to think of it. Possibly, "cluttering"? (Yes, that is a real term :) )

MelissaMay
12-01-04, 06:15 PM
I am very interested in this. I am new to these forums and this is the only post that I could find that deals with this.

My son is exactly as the OP said. He talks fast as if his brain is going faster than his mouth. It is very frustrating to say the least.

Anybody else have any info or feelings on this?

Thanks so much, Melissa

janesays
12-13-04, 07:40 PM
Speech is sometimes difficult for me too. Sometimes when I speak things come out very fragmented. I have a difficult time telling stories to people. My brother has the same problem. We both get overwhelmed when having to describe a series of events. Although imagining the events comes easily, verbally describing them is very difficult. Details are often missed and scentences don't flow.

Duckie
12-13-04, 11:26 PM
Last time, my therapist has been working on my storytelling problems. I often tell a story but missed some important information so I went back and forth and the people that listen doesn't have a clue what my point is. I just go on and on. She asked me to think about a story through and then tell it to her so that we could work on it. It was fun.

QueensU_girl
12-25-05, 05:21 PM
re:#6

Mom mother does that. (I am convinced she has ADD, or some sort of brain condition that worsens under stress.)

Starting a storyin the middle, or forgetting VITAL details can really mess things up, and create a crisis.

She had ADD testing, but they moreso seemed to make light of her symptoms, than see that her confusional statements ("Confabulation"; making things up -- but it's not lying) were SYMPTOMS of whatever is wrong with her.

The Testers did not allow family/friends to contribute, or I would have been able to give them important information.

Very frustrating.

Emma

QueensU_girl
02-06-06, 03:23 AM
PS. Dragon NS might be good for you, if you have to do any written work in your day-to-day life.

Emma

QueensU_girl
06-24-06, 08:04 PM
re: #6

Is that a SEQUENTIAL LD problem?

ummagumma
06-25-06, 02:17 AM
Yes.. I actually have become frustrated and angry during long conversations because talking is so...inefficient. When I speak a sentence, I'm done "saying" it in my mind by the time I've actually verbalized the first 2 words. After that point it's like my brain is idly waiting for me to get done talking. It's not a problem for brief conversations, but it builds up after a while.

meadd823
07-01-06, 04:08 AM
How many of you guys think in pictures?

I mean I don't think in words myself I have to convert when speaking writting is even worse. . . . . .pictures faster.

Nova
07-01-06, 07:00 AM
It's more like a 'movie reel', going on in my mind, Meadd.

I *see*, all probable outcomes/variables, of whatever I'm 'thinking' about, all at the same time.

That's why when someone asks me a question- I have A,B,C,D and sometimes E (movies) going on all at once, and I can't give an answer immediately.

The best I can do, is choose one, fast.

But yeah...movie reels.


Nova

dormammau2008
07-01-06, 07:26 AM
yes i think in pics an words as well an just like nova i can play a film in me head loo 18+ ;.)) i relive what i know an whats best to say then say it ??? confussing ant it dorm

needhelpinCA
07-11-06, 06:05 AM
When I speak or have to retell something I seem to always get muddled up. I then I end up retelling something and then losing myself and my audience, it drives me crazy so I have a hard time sometimes speaking up in class. But then there are sometimes when I cannot wait to speak and almost interrupt the teacher, because if I don't say it then it will be gone. I also forget details too a lot it drives my family mad. I always thought that this way of thinking was just me that I thought in this weird way and that I need to work harder to stop it but I never can stop it UGH.

Guest1
06-05-07, 11:29 AM
i can really relate to this really good i had speach problems to and i learn to talk at age 3 it is late i know i have problems decsreibing things

auntchris
06-22-07, 10:03 AM
I am the same way marytza

MattM
10-16-07, 10:47 PM
I just need to say that I have been diagnosed with Auditory Processing Disorder. Its frustrating and it has to do with more than how you take in information. I was trying to work on my college essays. I knew what I wanted to say, but not how to say it. Same with speaking, it feels like the english language is holding you back. Also, when I type I miss a lot of endings on words like I'd type miss when its supposed to be missed*. Its like that constantly.

meadd823
10-17-07, 05:32 AM
Same with speaking, it feels like the english language is holding you back.

Yep if I could just communicate my thoughts without using words my life would go much smoother.

possihaps
09-28-09, 11:13 PM
2yrs without a bump and i've dug it up with a google search. i actually thought at some point that my human body was faulty, but i figured i'd hit up google before jumping to any conclusions. i've read through the thread to get as much information on this as possible and have a few observations:

How many of you guys think in pictures?

absolutely, especially when it comes to explaining things. i almost want to say it's along the same lines as driving relying solely on landmarks, deciding only based on appearance and falling into a niche people call "learning by observing" or "a visual learner".

It's more like a 'movie reel', going on in my mind

for me, telling a story for longer than 1min can be a nightmare sometimes. the issue is, that movie is done and already repeating itself with subtle changes that when it comes out of my mouth, is written or typed, it's different from what i originally wanted it to be.

But then there are sometimes when I cannot wait to speak and almost interrupt the teacher, because if I don't say it then it will be gone.

i too am the same way. personally, i always want to deliver that perfectly timed line, great idea or thought and can't help chime in, but if i don't get to speak my mind, those thoughts are gone and replaced by something else in that moment.

I knew what I wanted to say, but not how to say it. Same with speaking, it feels like the english language is holding you back.

i'm hispanic and spanish was my first language as a toddler. i can speak spanish now, but it's based on how i've heard it and the amount i've learned up to a certain point (which does wonders when it comes to grammar and pronunciation).

growing up in the states (now making english my dominant language) definitely trumped my speech to the point where i feel my family (rarely) misunderstands me and my mind going a blistering 276mph would (sometimes) make me force out the end of anything spoken in english.

Yep if I could just communicate my thoughts without using words my life would go much smoother.

i read that and was stunned at how many times i've said that to myself before.

my questions after all of this would be; are these signs some form of disability/disorder? are there ways to relax the brain? think more clearly? sync your mouth/hands with your brain better? are the places online/offline to get more info on the subject of this thread in more detail?

bunkie68
08-17-10, 03:15 PM
Speech is sometimes difficult for me too. Sometimes when I speak things come out very fragmented. I have a difficult time telling stories to people. My brother has the same problem. We both get overwhelmed when having to describe a series of events. Although imagining the events comes easily, verbally describing them is very difficult. Details are often missed and scentences don't flow.

Wait, this is a problem? I've always spoken very quickly, and I joked that it was just my brain trying to keep up with my mouth. I've noticed that I stutter on occasion as I've gotten older. And I can't tell a story sequentially for love nor money - for instance, if someone asks me to tell them about a movie, I'll start, and then have to keep stopping and going back to add things I forgot.

glebo
08-23-10, 01:53 AM
I just have a read and when it comes to my own thinking, i think i have this as well which was Auditory Processing Disorder. Its why im always quiet during my undergraduate, although in most cases i know what is spoken, i cant seem to put into words. But strangly, it only happens in most cases when there is alot of pressure, or when your put on the spot by your peers.

And with the combination of inattenative ADHD... things can get alot worse from there.


Somethings one of the solutions thats in my head is that a recorder is needed and record youself in day to day life. So in case you forget something or what was said, stop the tape, rewind and play.

That said, i wish i knew my condition a long time ago...

doggie_love
09-22-10, 10:11 PM
This happens to me when I am writing. My hands can't move fast enough for my thoughts, so I sometimes write the last words of the sentence and have to go back and fill in the rest. I can write pretty fast, but not fast enough apparently. I also think in pictures especially when it comes to peoples names, as a result, I can never remember names.

haikuist
09-23-10, 02:40 AM
Speech is sometimes difficult for me too. Sometimes when I speak things come out very fragmented. I have a difficult time telling stories to people. My brother has the same problem. We both get overwhelmed when having to describe a series of events. Although imagining the events comes easily, verbally describing them is very difficult. Details are often missed and scentences don't flow.

I have had this particular issue for as long as I can remember. I usually know the story or event I'm trying to share, but telling it orally can be challenging. Probably one of the reasons I latched on to writing and stayed mostly quiet in my youth.

Justtess
09-27-10, 09:43 PM
I often talk a lot slower than I'm thinking and may catch myself at a loss for words. I'll miss the whole point of saying something.

Writing on the other hand...... well typing, I've learned to type very quickly and it seems to work very well. I'm a much better writer/typer than a speaker.

I think my son has picked this up too. He's a lot faster than I am and can complete an essay within an hour typing. If you asked him to speak about it.... the cat got his tongue.

janeo
11-20-10, 11:54 PM
I have a 14 year old son who has multiple physiological and psychological maladies; congenital METOPIC CRANIOSYNOSTOSIS (corrective cranial vault expansion at age 22 mos), VISION PROBLEMS (lazy eyes and double vision, subsequent to cranial/eye orbit surgery), DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS, ADHD (treated with Daytrana patch), AUTISM (Asperger's), and ongoing RECEPTIVE and EXPRESSIVE SPEECH problems, including his most recent diagnosis -- "CLUTTERING".

In retrospect, I recall my son as an active, but quiet child. Developmental delays were evident as he did not really speak until age 3+-, potty trained at age 5, and only recently learned to ride a bicycle at age 13. Testing upon entrance to the public school system at age six led to the diagnosis of ADHD. Follow-up testing at the Kennedy Kreiger Institute led to the diagnoses of Asperger's Autism and moderate language difficulties in both expressive and receptive speech.

As parents, my husband and I of course knew that our son had physical, social, and developmental "hurdles", however we are just now learning that his "disabilities" have scientific names and associated stigmas. We find ourselves in a constant state of "flux", trying to digest an overwhelming array of medical literature in order to educate ourselves, cross reference diagnoses, correlate symptoms, investigate interventional treatment, and overall, just come to better understand our son, how he functions; his weaknesses, strengths, restrictions -- all things affecting his quality of life and future goals.

With respect to this forum, "difficulties in communication", I believe the term "CLUTTERING" perfectly describes my son's pattern of communication; both SPEECH and WRITING.

His oral and written fluency is "choppy" (fragmented), disorganized, repetitive, and contain words that are often inappropriate (not the correct tense or meaning). His sentences begin in a LOUD, rapid fire, monotonous tone that trails off into a low, but rapid mumble (having grown worse with the onset of puberty and associated deepening of the voice). To me, it seems he is trying to speak urgently before his mind forgets what it is he is trying to convey - and being really excited about a topic just compounds the issue. Quite often, following a rapid barrage of verbage, he'll end a statement with the question, "RIGHT?", much to the discomfort and bewilderment of his "audience". Ironically, I believe his question is rhetorical, having more to do with self-appreciating pride at having voiced his thought, rather than a conscious effort to assure "audience" approval and understanding of his idea. Strangely, he doesn't seem aware of how rapid and unintelligible his speech is. He shows awareness only when asked to repeat himself, or when someone asks him to slow down his speech. Upon request, he will obligingly repeat his thought, making a conscious effort to slow down, but the effort is fleeting; speed and slurring of words prevalent by the end of his next sentence. On rare occasion he will show frustration at having been asked to repeat himself, responding with a quiet and disheartened "oh, never mind...". He will, however restate his thought with a fair amount of coaxing, persuasion, and cajoling. During speech, he doesn't enunciate his words, due in part to what I perceive as a "stationary" placement of his tongue, lack of lip movement, and possible limitation due to irregularities of his palate/teeth. (When not speaking, his mouth is agape; a rather common finding in autistic children.)

From a personal standpoint, I will admit to being an introvert with an aversion to public speaking. However, I fortunately find myself blessed with the ability to compensate for my verbal inadequacies via the written word. I can't help but think how frustrating and difficult it must be for those who can't communicate effectively by one means or another. Life is challenging enough without the added pressure of what should come so naturally - the act of communicating! Society and our educational system judge intellect based on the ability to communicate effectively. The misnomer being that people who can't adequately convey their thoughts are oft considered "unintelligent" and shunned by society.

Having a medical background, I can relate this situation to those persons having suffered aphasia as a result of a stroke. How "trapped" they must feel in their own bodies; sadly encumbered by physical limitations. My son must relate to this feeling on many levels. How sad I feel for him. He, who has struggled with this problem all of his childhood, and who must endure this challenge likely the remainder of his life.

Complicating his circumstance is the sad truth that, we as a society, have arrogantly elevated our thinking to an elite level of judging others. Our impatience and unsympathetic tendencies have caused many to cast aversion on those unreasonably deemed "sub-standard" by comparison. We, as a society must learn to be more compassionate and understanding of those with physical challenges and limitations. - "Let fate intervene for those lacking humanity."

elinorprescott
12-18-11, 07:32 PM
yeah i have that sort of problem too, i speak way too fast and my words just come out jumbled, it's anoying to me and most of my family comment on it... in my case i still dunno if it's linked in with ADD

tenko
09-30-12, 01:36 PM
That's funny about the bike thing.

I was 11 until I could ride, much later than all the other boys in the village. One Sunday in summer at my grandma's house, I agreed to go for a bike ride with the boy next door. After failing to mount the saddle a few times I ended up walking the bike to the end of the drive, where I gave him my 50p pocket money not to tell anyone/harass me for the rest of the holiday.

Memories are tricky things, mine seem to become more less specific but more "essential" with time.

I will look back and remember a period of my life with maybe one or two vivid scenes, but they're vague, and the boundaries between visual, emotional and sensory stimuli are always blurred: interchangeable almost. Like the smell of buttered toast at a friend's house or the smell of suntan lotion and the noise at an outdoor pool or the angle of the sun are all a part of the same thing. At the same time, I very rarely remember conversation. Over time, my memories just seem to condense into a vivid jumble of feelings and sensations.

I also hated not being able to express myself too when younger. My elder older brother, the family scholar, has always been very articulate which was frustrating at the time, but probably helped me in the long run. I would use words obsessively, running them into the ground. At other times I would amuse my family by getting them mixed up: I'd say my parent's friend must have a lot of "dope" to live in such a huge house, instead of "dough".lol.

I think having ADD somehow makes imagining being other people more tangible. For example, I still watch films and find myself behaving and like one of the characters (usually the lead). Tragically, I still do this to some extent with people I admire in real life. Sometimes it can give you confidence in unfamiliar surroundings.

One result and by-product of having an overactive imagination (and probably anxiety) as a child were nightmares. They were terrible. I used to read the "goosebumps" novels and scare the crap out of myself all night imagining the dark forces rising up to get me.

Also:

Incompetent tier of shoelaces until a late age.
Unable to learn lines for school plays but strong natural performer.
Unable to learn sheet music for drumming, could play at a much higher level by ear than by reading music (I still think it's pointless unless you're playing professionally or something).
Terrible recounter of events, dates, names, numbers (all the the unimportant stuff, naturally).
Consistently bottom of my year for maths, chemistry, physics: anything requiring the learning of rules or facts.:yes: