View Full Version : Do I really want a Mac or is it just my ADHD?


alan1
04-09-10, 06:41 AM
I run a PC but my computer is very old and I need a new one soon. The iMacs look really cool. They look like fun and I like the sleek uncluttered look too. No jumble of wires suits my taste. But switching from a Windows environement would be a potential hassle. I know that you can now use Windows software on a Mac but the switch would still be a big one. I'm also trying to decide how much of this switch is just because my ADHD head likes new stuff just to entertain myself. How many others buy things like that because we like to mix things up, keep things lively and keep our brains entertained?
So, PC to Mac switchers, was it worth it?

kateribethrose
04-09-10, 07:57 AM
Hi, I am new but I will jump right in.

I don't actually have a mac, but I have used a mac and I have a pc. I think you should go ahead. It is good that you question yourself. I would be that way too. I want the new shiny thing and get all excited about it.

Yet, you said your computer is old... and it's time for a new one. A mac would be a nice clean operating system that is the most recent and less likely to be obsolete in two years... that mac that I mentioned is like seven years old and still works like a dream compared to some pc's I have used.

If you can afford it and feel you can quickly make the transition from windows to apple programs. I say go ahead.

Then again, I don't know you. I hope I helped a little.

Pamplemousse
04-09-10, 08:25 AM
The switch was like entering heaven for me. My PC was like a slow over-aged dinosaur. I got a MacBook Pro and it runs amazing. Granted I can't play some of my games for Windows unless I use Bootcamp to install Windows on it. But I like my Mac OSX snow leopard operating system. Runs clean, no bugs and I don't get all those annoying pop ups. They might be expensive but they are well worth it! :D

FrazzleDazzle
04-09-10, 08:45 AM
I made the switch to an iMac and never looked back. You are good to do the research as you are and ask questions of users to get feedback. I don't miss the time I spent on my pc fixing whatever the heck happened and have more productive time on my iMac. It's just beautiful. The os is a liitle different to get used to but it is very user friendly and makes more sense to me. Just make sure you always run the time machine backup and any issues are a snap to get through.

Nishira
04-09-10, 08:59 AM
coming from a computer support background - i can tell you that many people ~hated~ their computers, and were convinced the computer was utter crap. in reality, the computer was fine - they just had so much stuff accumulated on their computer over time that it bogged down the operating system (windows). so for many, simply re-installing the operating system can be a much cheaper fix.

as far as PCs or Macs. PCs are *a lot*....and i mean *a lot* less expensive. So it depends on your budget. Just imagine all of the extra software and stuff you could buy w/your PC for the same money as just the Mac.

Also, listen - at the end of the day the Mac is just another computer that does stuff you need it to do. You can buy "shiny PCs". Also, Windows 7 is less clutter then previous operating systems. Also with Windows - you'll have the confidence of knowing that any software you might need - you can find with ease, and lots of it for free as well. With Mac - there's ton's of software but not as easily and readily available as PC.

Yes, you can run Windows on a Mac. You'll need to have your Windows disk to do that - so be sure that you do. Also, it should run fine for standard business apps but i wouldn't expect to use that windows environment for any games and such.

if you're a game player - you definitely want a PC.

At the end of the day, it really depends on what you want/need. Write down a list of everything you see yourself doing w/the computer now, in six months and in a few years. Ask yourself what would be the most efficient system for that? What would be the most flexible to allow you to add the newest software? If you want the Mac just for a new toy - that's ok too - but be honest w/yourself about it. If there's a productivity reason to actually "need" the Mac, to justify the added expenditure and reduced flexibility of not having the same plethora of software options available to you - then you're bound to see that on the list you create.

Remember, when the newness of something *shiny* wears off, you want to be sure it does everything you want/need it to do for today and the future.

meridian
04-09-10, 01:06 PM
Depending on your computer use as a content creator vs content consumer, an iPad might worth a look.

If you want to browse the web and check email, watch some videos, read some books, organize photos, it might be a good choice -- BUT like the iPhone and iPod, the iPad is a computer peripheral and needs a host computer.

The MacMini is another possibility if you already have a keyboard monitor and mouse you like.

PCs can be cheaper, but when compared head-to-head with similar feature sets and quality of components, the prices are generally quite similar between Macs and PCs equipped to match.

cosinezero
04-09-10, 01:14 PM
The switch was like entering heaven for me. My PC was like a slow over-aged dinosaur. I got a MacBook Pro and it runs amazing. Granted I can't play some of my games for Windows unless I use Bootcamp to install Windows on it. But I like my Mac OSX snow leopard operating system. Runs clean, no bugs and I don't get all those annoying pop ups. They might be expensive but they are well worth it! :D

-->You bought a *new* computer, that's why runs fast and has no bugs.

Macs suffer from the same problems... So do cars. Buy a newer car, you get better technology under the hood. It runs better because it's not worn out - or full of sludge from years of not being maintained properly.

When deciding to make the jump to Macs, you should seriously think about what you use your PC for. If all you do - and ever want to do - is use email and surf the web, a Mac is nice but way, way overpriced for those functions. A small netbook will be just as slick and much more cost-effective.

ADHDTigger
04-09-10, 01:40 PM
I run a PC but my computer is very old and I need a new one soon. The iMacs look really cool. They look like fun and I like the sleek uncluttered look too. No jumble of wires suits my taste. But switching from a Windows environement would be a potential hassle. I know that you can now use Windows software on a Mac but the switch would still be a big one. I'm also trying to decide how much of this switch is just because my ADHD head likes new stuff just to entertain myself. How many others buy things like that because we like to mix things up, keep things lively and keep our brains entertained?
So, PC to Mac switchers, was it worth it?

OH YES!!!

I also gave all Microsoft the boot at the same time. The software I use is either dual environment- and there is a ton of it- specific to the Mac, or open source. There is absolutely nothing I can't do on a Mac and many things I can do better.

chronological
04-09-10, 02:13 PM
So, PC to Mac switchers, was it worth it?

This is not an ADHD-generated question. It's a Windows-sucks-the-life-out-of-people-and makes-them-want-to-stick-needles-in-their-eyes one.

Short answer:
Are you either not tied to a Windows-only app, or if you are, are you willing to spend the extra to get Windows running under Parallels or VMWare on your Mac? If so, the switch is worth it. Otherwise, stay where you are. Remember, Mac OS, Windows - they're *just operating systems*.

Long answer:
I've used (and still do), Mac OS, Windows, and Linux. My primary OS is now Mac OS, and I switched to that from Windows over a year ago. I still run Windows under Parallels for the few Windows-only apps I need.

The biggest advantages are (most obvious first):

Almost no worries now about malware (viruses etc). They're not non-existent in theory, but in practice pretty much are. I run a firewall but no performance-sucking anti-malware at all
System stability -- e.g. fewer lockups, fewer stupid warnings from things like printers because their drivers are conflicting with some unrelated app. (I mean, WTF is *that* about HP!?)
It Just Works. Hardware gets found. Networking connects. Printers are Just There And Ready
Its soooo shiny

To be fair, points 1 to 3 are not really something Apple can claim much credit for. They are mainly functions of Mac OS being a much smaller and more controlled ecosystem than the badlands of Windows. After all, your desktop stapler probably doesn't suffer from viruses, nor does it crash with a blue screen, and it probably gets its stapling job right 99 times out of 100. But that's not saying much. Which brings me to:

The biggest disadvantages are (most obvious first):

Microsoft Office on the Mac is sufficiently different from Office 2007 on the PC that it may as well not be called the same thing. If you have people (clients, bosses, etc) using 2007 on Windows, and especially if they've moved to the new doc formats, you can't get by without Windows somewhere
Much less choice in software. Personally I, as an ADD person, find that a blessing! :) Others may not.
Games. If I was a PC-based gamer, the Mac would suck. But I use XBox, so I'm fine.

O'Doyle
04-09-10, 02:39 PM
Warning: Nerd on meds (long post alert)

From a veteran gamer, student, & IT professional: (me, in case you're wondering)

Gaming:

PCs play the highest-end games in the highest detail levels, etc—but only if you fork over a HUGE wad of cash about every 3.5-5 years. PC game development houses actually push the hardware industry, not the other way around. About ever 4 years, someone will release a genre-defining game that NOBODY with current equipment could hope to crank to top-end detail, sound, etc—especially not on a widescreen 25+ inch monitor (higher resolution requires more video processing horsepower even at identical detail level). A good recent(ish) example of this was Crysis—it was amazing, truly, but only those with $3k invested (or overclockers) could hope to see it in all its glory without frame-rate issues.

Having spent a good many years being the poor (literally) sap that HAD to play the greatest games at the best detail levels, I've come to this conclusion: screw that.

Want HD gaming?

A 360 is less money and won't require upgrades, maintenance (aside from the red ring o death, etc.), or expensive monthly memberships aside from XBL.

Not HD enough?

A PS3 costs a bit more than the 360, but still WAY expensive than the high-end PC gaming rigs with SLI video cards & expensive cooling systems, etc. The PS3's visuals are nothing short of stunning on a good HDTV, and it still supports online multiplayer, etc.

On displays:
HDTVs are still FAR cheaper than comparably-sized LCD monitors—and there aren't many monitors even available over 30".

Don't care about HD gaming, but want to be able to play something fun from time to time?

Buy a Wii. I <3 mine, and I didn't have to go buy an HDTV I couldn't afford at the time. Many of the Wii titles available are crap, but I've got about 15 of the best, and it's a great distraction from my studies when I need one.

Productivity:

PCs are (sadly) still the gold standard in office productivity, with a bajillion percent of the market share for business machines—especially in networked environments. Before deciding on a Mac vs a PC, you'll need to weigh whether or not you would be bringing work from your office PC home with you. Just because M$ makes an Office for the Mac doesn't mean that *every* little detail of formatting in your paper/spreadsheet/presentation/etc. will *perfectly* migrate between platforms.
Heck, most of the versions of M$ Office (97, XP, 2003, 2007, etc,) don't even play well with each other on identical PC hardware—let alone with the versions they made for the Mac, lol.

My personal choice:
Now, with all of those caveats: I bought a Macbook Pro when I went back to school. My reasons:

- My last job before leaving for school again was working helpdesk/network support/remote administration for the County of Racine, Township of Burlington, and Township of Norway, WI. I babysat 930+ Windows clients of various versions with various version numbers of M$ Office, and the interoperability issues were a daily pain in the you-know-where. Multi-version M$ Office environments really *don't* work well—don't believe anyone that tells you otherwise. Viruses were a COMMON issue. I also handled you-name-whatever software packages for running small township fire dept, police, taxation, accounting & payroll, etc. databases. The front-ends all interacted with SQL servers on-site, etc. Bleh. CRAP some of SQL Server's quirks are horrible—but I digress.

By the time I was finished my 2 years there, I just couldn't look at another damn Windows/Office/SQL Server/Virus/Peachtree Accounting/User-driven data loss, etc. I'd had it. 930+ Windows clients spread across an entire county drove me straight into the loving arms of my Macbook Pro.

- I'm a control freak and an efficiency lunatic. I have come to *really* depend highly upon how quickly I can use OSX's keyboard shortcuts and Spotlight to launch apps and find documents in a fraction of a second. Again, any time I have to take my fingers off the keys is wasted time in my opinion.

- In keeping with my computer OCD, I *highly* appreciate that OSX is basically a shiny, candy-coated user interface riding on top of an incredibly powerful version of BSD. OSX is (mostly) a flavor of UNIX, like all the various Linux distributions. This means that those who are familiar with using the Terminal in whatever 'NIX distribution they are comfortable with will find they can use OSX's Terminal.app to shell script the crap out of anything they need to get done. OSX looks cute, but it's got SERIOUS power 'under the hood,' for those brave enough to learn how to use it.

- Did I mention my OCD? OSX also has a fun little app called Automator. Oh. My. Word. Automator is worth the price of the computer itself—you can use it to, well, automate (durr) any common repetitive tasks you find yourself doing in pretty much whatever Mac app they build Automator support into. It's hard to overstate how epic a win Automator is, really...
Have a look: http://www.macosxautomation.com/automator/

- It runs the program I needed. Ultimately this is the focal point of everyone's personal decision, really. I am a student in Bible college, and will be headed to seminary afterward, Lord-willing. I needed an extremely powerful & reliable Bible-study program that handles the original Koine Greek & Ancient Hebrew/Aramaic, has an intuitive user-interface, and would offer me the ability to add *individual* modules to it as I needed.

There's only one program on the market with that much speed, power, and granular control over module upgrades—and it's only available for a Mac. That sealed the deal for me.

Lastly, my experience thus far:
Being a Mac user hasn't been all sunshine & puppy-dog farts. Every computer or software manufacturer has some level of quality-control issue somewhere. What distinguishes between an average company and a great company is how quickly & thoroughly their customer service department moves to make sure the customer is cared for and feels satisfied with their product.

My laptop [Macbook Pro 3,1—July '07] was the first generation to have the new LED-backlit LCD screens, and many of us that bought the first run of them had issues of yellowness in the lower portion of the screen. People with OCD (many Mac users are, I'd venture) who just spent $2500 on a flagship-level laptop are going to be insane when they get it home and it looks like someone peed on the lower-mid portion of the screen—I was no exception. What distinguished Apple—and earned me their business for as long as they make quality products—was how fast, thorough, and professional their customer service department was.

Not only did they replace the screen, they shipped me the box to put it in overnight. It was on my doorstep the next morning—I called at 5PM! Then, once it was repaired, the courier had a theft issue. Someone working for DHL ripped the tag off my laptop's box in Ohio and stuck it under the desk, hoping to steal it that Friday. When the 3 days the Apple tech told me it would take for my service turnaround came and went, I called him back and told him I hadn't seen it.

He called DHL and climbed all up on their booboo. I never had to deal with it, but the Apple service rep got DHL to do a nationwide track & physical premises search for any box matching the size mine would have been in!

Before DHL found my laptop hidden under a desk, the Apple rep even offered to overnight me a brand new laptop and have Apple sue DHL for me—I'd be taken care of, and they could iron out all the crap without wasting my time!

THAT's why I'm an Apple customer for life. The computers are high enough quality, the operating system is frankly much quicker & more stable than Windows (no matter what the stupid Windows 7 commercials might claim), and yes, it runs the application that I absolutely needed to have—but the customer service is what will keep me coming back.

Dell, Acer, Toshiba, Compaq, HP—sure, they make a mostly tolerable product, but you can be sure they won't overnight you a replacement & sue their own shipper just to make sure you remain a satisfied customer...

My $.02,

~OD

skribblz
04-09-10, 02:42 PM
build a hackint0sh, than use WINE to run windows programs, or you can dual boot.

Also you can build a faster mac and spend less money, if you wanted to build your own computer and just install mac on it.

Nishira
04-09-10, 02:43 PM
One thing about the games though - being a PC owner doesn't mean one has to have the latest games. One can own a PC have run games a few years behind the curve with probably, great efficiency (depending on the PC) and - get those games on the $cheap$, especially with services like Gametap and Steam.

"puppy dog farts" - i love it !!!

Nishira
04-09-10, 02:44 PM
build a hackint0sh, than use WINE to run windows programs, or you can dual boot.

Also you can build a faster mac and spend less money, if you wanted to build your own computer and just install mac on it.

yeah but, you'd have to have a copy of the MAC OS to do that. Also, i don't believe that installing the MAC OS on a regular PC would be seamless, no? I've seen docs on how to do it - and it confused me (granted - i'm easily confused anyhow :p)

O'Doyle
04-09-10, 02:51 PM
Plus, using OSX on a 'hackint0sh' is technically a violation of the EULA, so it's basically illegal(ish).

Also, you have to re-hack the stupid thing every time there's an update to OSX. It's not more than 3-4x a year, but it's still a pain in the rear.


PM me if you want a link to a good OSX86 site.

skribblz
04-09-10, 02:56 PM
I've never had any problems updating my osx, everything works perfectly if you get the right hardware.

the site to find the hardware that are compatible is right here.

hxxp://www.osx86project.org/

Tabbycat
04-09-10, 03:04 PM
I LOVE my Macbook & iPhone - only regret is not doing the switch from PC to Mac sooner.

ADHDTigger
04-09-10, 03:20 PM
Being an open source junkie- and a technology professional for ~20 years, I can say with authority that Neo Office for the Mac, like Open Office for Windows is a great solution to all the funky-poo doc formats out there. Where it fails is in carrying over Excel macros. My partner uses a budgeting spreadsheet- he's a programmer- that he built a ton of macros into. Alas, the VBA macros didn't work in Open Office when he was still using Windows. When he decided to Mac (and therefore Neo Office), he discovered that his handy VBA macros DID work.

My partner kicked Windows to the curb a year after I did. After 35 years of IT- software development and application architecture- and a solid Windows guy- he will tell you that he will NEVER be a Windows guy again. He loves his Mac. Because he does still do a few things in a Win only environment, he is running XP under Parallels. I refer to it as consorting with Satan.

I went iMac in December and love it. I carry an XP netbook when I travel because I don't do more than check in here and read email when we are away from home. The netbook does that.

I do still have a couple of Windows boxes around. I have a couple of games that are not yet available for the Mac. But my primary machine and the one I use the most often is Mac.

O'Doyle
04-09-10, 03:25 PM
Alas, the VBA macros didn't work in Open Office when he was still using Windows. When he decided to Mac (and therefore Neo Office), he discovered that his handy VBA macros DID work.

Oddly enough, Tig, those macros won't work (out of the box, anyway) on GENUINE M$ Office 2008 (Mac version of 2007). The Redmond Nazis found a way to cripple their OWN software, presumably to force consumers to buy MORE OF THEIR OWN SOFTWARE.

Argh! I swear Redmond is really Mordor.

chronological
04-09-10, 05:10 PM
build a hackint0sh, than use WINE to run windows programs, or you can dual boot.

Also you can build a faster mac and spend less money, if you wanted to build your own computer and just install mac on it.

Yeah, that's what an ADD'er needs -- to add "build PC", "get hackintosh running" "get WINE running" to their already overstuffed todo list/pile/congealed-blob-in-the-corner :p

cosinezero
04-09-10, 05:29 PM
Oddly enough, Tig, those macros won't work (out of the box, anyway) on GENUINE M$ Office 2008 (Mac version of 2007). The Redmond Nazis found a way to cripple their OWN software, presumably to force consumers to buy MORE OF THEIR OWN SOFTWARE.

Argh! I swear Redmond is really Mordor.

-->MS/.NET software developer here. Hi. :)

Pretty sure that MS isn't in the business of crippleware - MS makes the vast majority of their money on corporate software, generally those customers aren't keen on being jerked around like that. MS thrives off of office developers - whose business is VBA macros / office automation. If they crippled VBA (and to be honest, I'd like to see that rumor substantiated), it was for a damned good reason.

It's more likely that they had a patent or monopoly violation in the macro code and were forced to disable it out of box. That, or it might have been a security issue.

ADHDTigger
04-09-10, 05:47 PM
-->MS/.NET software developer here. Hi. :)

Pretty sure that MS isn't in the business of crippleware - MS makes the vast majority of their money on corporate software, generally those customers aren't keen on being jerked around like that. MS thrives off of office developers - whose business is VBA macros / office automation. If they crippled VBA (and to be honest, I'd like to see that rumor substantiated), it was for a damned good reason.

It's more likely that they had a patent or monopoly violation in the macro code and were forced to disable it out of box. That, or it might have been a security issue.

Actually, VBA from older versions of Office really DON'T work with Office 2008. It was with the shift to docx et al that this occurred. Macro language went from VBA to Object Oriented Basic- which looks not like Visual Basic.

It also tossed a wrench into any backward compatibility. But that isn't a first with the Office Suite. It has happened before, it is likely to happen again. Oddly, the work around is to open older docs using Open Office or Neo Office.

I think that it was the change in VBA that finally tipped my partner into kicking MS to the curb. From his perspective, if he is going to learn a new language, he'd rather learn something more portable. Of course, he's retired now so he spends his time converting the programs he wrote in VB to Java.

O'Doyle
04-09-10, 05:48 PM
-->MS/.NET software developer here. Hi. :)

Pretty sure that MS isn't in the business of crippleware - MS makes the vast majority of their money on corporate software, generally those customers aren't keen on being jerked around like that. MS thrives off of office developers - whose business is VBA macros / office automation. If they crippled VBA (and to be honest, I'd like to see that rumor substantiated), it was for a damned good reason.

It's more likely that they had a patent or monopoly violation in the macro code and were forced to disable it out of box. That, or it might have been a security issue.

Nope, turns out they're just lazy:
From the "issues" section of Macintouch's review: http://www.macintouch.com/reviews/office2008/
Visual Basic for Applications

In a highly controversial move, Microsoft's Mac BU chose to remove Visual Basic for Applications from Office 2008 — meaning all existing VBA-based macros will no longer run. VBA is widely used in enterprises to automate internal processes. Mac BU developers have blogged openly about this issue, and while their decision is unpopular, at least we know why it was made.
Mac BU Software Design Lead Erik Schwiebert has written the most about the challenges developers faced in converting VBA to the Intel architecture. Briefly, the old VBA system is heavily dependent upon thousands of tiny fragments of hand-built PowerPC code written over a decade ago, strung together and adjusted on the fly using techniques specific to PowerPC chips and CodeWarrior's compiler. VBA is really a rudimentary compiler — one of the most challenging kinds of software to write. Rebuilding the VBA system to work with Intel chips and the frequently-changing GCC compiler used by Xcode would have added two years to Office 2008's development, according to Microsoft — just to re-implement VBA, with no improvements.
Faced with two years of work simply to maintain the status quo, and not improve the product in any measurable way, the Mac BU chose to drop VBA.
Microsoft provides guides for porting Office 2004 and Office 2008 macros to AppleScript on their web site. But, MacInTouch readers have already discovered that this is not a complete solution. Significantly, Excel and Word 2008 cannot trigger AppleScripts from buttons, or run custom macros that evaluate and process data. This means Excel- and Word-based forms are dead in the water, and users with libraries of custom macros that analyze data are out of luck.
Despite being given a year and a half's warning that this was coming, automation solutions for advanced users are in short supply. These are the users that were effectively locked into Microsoft Office by their libraries of documents and macros; many are now looking for an Office replacement.
(It's worth noting that the OpenOffice project has a VBA interoperability effort underway. It's incomplete at the moment, but this may provide a viable option in the future.)
There were reports that VBA had been end-of-lifed in Office for Windows as well, prompted by Microsoft telling its users to migrate to Visual Studio Tools for Office. Microsoft's Joseph Chirilov has responded that there are no plans to remove VBA from Excel for Windows, writing "We understand that VBA is a critical capability for large numbers of our customers."

Excel 4.0 Macros

There appears to be some confusion about the scope of VBA's removal. Old Excel 4.0 Macros are not based on VBA, and if they have not been ported to VBA, they still run under Office 2008. But, as with Office 2004 and Office v.X (2001), Office 2008 cannot record new XLM macros.

Perhaps we ought to ask why, if it's so difficult to rewrite the PowerPC code, couldn't we just wrap the existing, functional VBA code from the Windows version inside a WINE wrapper and make it work for Mac users?

If I can play (some) windows games via Crossover, why can't we use WINE for a simple macro subsystem? Do we *really* think it's harder to wrap the VB system than it is to make Teamfortress 2 work?!? :rolleyes:

O'Doyle
04-09-10, 05:54 PM
Hilariously, the reason for dropping VBA from '08 turns out to be that M$ doesn't feel like coding for Intel architecture.

Oh sweet, sweet, delicious irony! :D

Om nom nom nom.

skribblz
04-09-10, 06:44 PM
Yeah, that's what an ADD'er needs -- to add "build PC", "get hackintosh running" "get WINE running" to their already overstuffed todo list/pile/congealed-blob-in-the-corner :p

well since we tend to hyper focus on what we like, i believe for us tech nerds love to do this :)

daveddd
04-09-10, 07:06 PM
once you go mac , you never go back

mines 1 and a 1/2 years old

no junk,no pop ups, no viruses, no weird scanning and error report messages , faster than a ninja still

do it!!!

alan1
04-09-10, 07:45 PM
Wow!. Thanks everyone for the response. This is for home use but not much in the way of games. At work we have to go with the PC. The Mac users that I know who have made the switch are all enthusiastic about their Mac and it can't ALL be due to good marketing. Constantly dealing with glitches for years and years with the Microsoft products is what is stimulating the thought. Using it with parallels should make life easy using both. Admittedly, part of me DOES want to make the switch just to keep myself entertained with something new and different. So in summary, I expect that I will gp with one of the iMacs.

ADHDTigger
04-09-10, 07:50 PM
Alan, you will never regret it!

My iMac is only three months old. Fits me perfectly. Partner has had NO trouble with Win XP on Parallels.

Let us know when you make the switch. Plenty of Mac users on the forum willing to help.

tinkerbell84
04-09-10, 08:29 PM
I switched after my last pc which was high end and high tech (with touch screen etc.) had nothing but problems and pretty much died after only two years. Both software and hardware had MAJOR issues. It drove me absolutely nuts. Everyone kept telling me to get a Mac and I will never have those problems. Well, I got the Macbook Pro and I like it. But so far, I don't love it like some people. Some of the little problems are present, as with any computer. It is not all perfect and although the switch in operating system is pretty easy, I don't think it is "totally intuitive" like everyone claims. Some applications are hard to learn and I hate the Office 2008 for Mac. Why can't they just make it exactly the same? Some of the Mac programs look like from the 1970s in my opinion.

Overall it works well and I haven't had any major issues. I am easy to satisfy because my last computer wouldn't even really start or shut down and constantly crashed. So yeah, this is cool, but there are certain things I do miss and that I dislike. I am not obsessed with it like some Mac users. And I am not yet ready to say "Once you go Mac you never go back".

However, most Mac users disagree with me and are in love with theirs, so I guess it's worth a shot.

ADHDTigger
04-09-10, 09:02 PM
I switched after my last pc which was high end and high tech (with touch screen etc.) had nothing but problems and pretty much died after only two years. Both software and hardware had MAJOR issues. It drove me absolutely nuts. Everyone kept telling me to get a Mac and I will never have those problems. Well, I got the Macbook Pro and I like it. But so far, I don't love it like some people. Some of the little problems are present, as with any computer. It is not all perfect and although the switch in operating system is pretty easy, I don't think it is "totally intuitive" like everyone claims. Some applications are hard to learn and I hate the Office 2008 for Mac. Why can't they just make it exactly the same? Some of the Mac programs look like from the 1970s in my opinion.

Overall it works well and I haven't had any major issues. I am easy to satisfy because my last computer wouldn't even really start or shut down and constantly crashed. So yeah, this is cool, but there are certain things I do miss and that I dislike. I am not obsessed with it like some Mac users. And I am not yet ready to say "Once you go Mac you never go back".

However, most Mac users disagree with me and are in love with theirs, so I guess it's worth a shot.

Check out Neo Office for the Mac. It's free and pretty darned easy to use. Best of all, you can open and use Office stuff with it.

If you are having problems with an app, PM me. Chances are, I can give you a shortcut or two.

gnbeg
04-09-10, 11:11 PM
I run a PC but my computer is very old and I need a new one soon. The iMacs look really cool. They look like fun and I like the sleek uncluttered look too. No jumble of wires suits my taste. But switching from a Windows environement would be a potential hassle. I know that you can now use Windows software on a Mac but the switch would still be a big one. I'm also trying to decide how much of this switch is just because my ADHD head likes new stuff just to entertain myself. How many others buy things like that because we like to mix things up, keep things lively and keep our brains entertained?
So, PC to Mac switchers, was it worth it?

I never made the ADHD & Mac connection before. It's an interesting question. About 15 years ago, I moved from UNIX to Windows. Yuck. I had a chance to try Mac OS 8. Been hooked ever since.

This past winter I built a WIndows 7 PC. Just for the heck of it. Wanted to know what all the fuss was. Supposedly Win 7 was finally an OS that could challenge Mac OS X.

It's a good think I kept my MacBook.

Mac OS X is a better OS. It is easier to use. It is more stable. I can say this after using Mac for the last 15 years and trying Windows 7 the last 4 months.

There's also an "energy" or "passion" to Mac OS X that Windows doesn't have. Yah, some have likened it to a cult or religion. But I think that's the attraction to ADHD'ers. Mac OS X is fun.

How hard the switch would be depends on what you do on you PC. Most of the stuff you can do on the PC, you can also do on a Mac.

Anyway, I got carried away. Good luck with your decision.

indy
04-10-10, 06:20 AM
if you want a computer that works the first time, and works all the time, buy a mac. i've been using them for almost 20 years straight with a short break with a desktop and laptop pc and i will never go there again. you should buy a mac because you are adhd. it is sooooooo much easier to keep everything clean and tidy with a mac and nothing ever disappears or hides. also, don't worry about office. mac and windows office programs are now seamless. i do some publishing work between my mac and a corporate pc and have never had any problems with importing text and photos and using templates. the extra money you spend on a mac will be accounted for by not having to buy virus protection/detection software and not having to run to the tech shop every time your pc crashes. you get what you pay for. but... if you are a hardcore gamer then i guess you have to use a pc. i wouldn't know.

cosinezero
04-10-10, 11:26 AM
Hilariously, the reason for dropping VBA from '08 turns out to be that M$ doesn't feel like coding for Intel architecture.

-->Hrm - Ok, I thought we were talking about VBA in PC 2k8. I'm not really surprised to hear they dropped support for Mac -anything-, their own disdain for their Mac application departments is huge.

Not surprising MS doesn't want to port hacked together PPC code; and simply 'wrapping' hacks doesn't always work in practice. As a company, they're looking to generally invest in .NET framework more, likely that's where office macros are headed anyways (VB.NET is a huge improvement in readability over even VBA).

Dunno for sure tho, haven't written an office/OLE macro in eons. :)

O'Doyle
04-10-10, 11:35 AM
-->Hrm - Ok, I thought we were talking about VBA in PC 2k8. I'm not really surprised to hear they dropped support for Mac -anything-, their own disdain for their Mac application departments is huge.

Not surprising MS doesn't want to port hacked together PPC code; and simply 'wrapping' hacks doesn't always work in practice. As a company, they're looking to generally invest in .NET framework more, likely that's where office macros are headed anyways (VB.NET is a huge improvement in readability over even VBA).

Dunno for sure tho, haven't written an office/OLE macro in eons. :)

Yeah, frankly I'm surprised they didn't abandon VBA support even for the PC side years ago. VB.NET is WAY more secure, portable, etc. Lol, how many Office updates have been shoveled on us for VBA vulnerabilities in Excel alone? Last time I owned Office 2000 Pro, I think I got update notifications like every week.

Seriously though, tell me it isn't hilarious that the ultimate end reason for the M$ Mac BU dropping VBA support is that they don't feel like re-coding for Intel. Bwaaaaaaaaaahhahahaha!

gnbeg
04-10-10, 11:58 AM
well since we tend to hyper focus on what we like, i believe for us tech nerds love to do this :)

Some things are lines on a to-do-list. "Do taxes", "balance checkbook", "organize office".

Some things do not have to go on a to-do-list. "Build PC" is one of those for me.

It's the stuff that I do that's not on my to-do-list that often keeps me from doing the stuff on my to-do-list. :)

ADHDTigger
04-10-10, 12:32 PM
I have to commend everyone on this thread for being so NICE to one another. I can't tell you how many discussions like this I have participated in on tech sites that end in name calling and flame wars. Are ADHD computer professionals just generally nicer than the non-ADHD ones? I don't know. I just know that I have been very impressed by all of my peers here.

You guys all ROCK!!!

meridian
04-10-10, 12:49 PM
I started out with 2 DEC systems in the late 70s. It ran CPM, we hired software programmers to create custom software for us since there was very little off the shelf for business at that time. We really never got the DECs to run as well as I would have liked.

We also had a Wang word processing system that I learned how to script. That machine worked very well for us.

Then in 1982 we got a highly customized Apple ][e from a company called Autographics which told us rather plainly that 1 person with a single desk and a $25,000 computer system could easily out-perform a staff of 20 in a 4500 square foot 4 story facility making slides "conventionally" so we sold that business.

I decided I wanted my own personal computer and in 1983 bought a Radio Shack Model 100, pretty much the first laptop.

In late 83 early 84 I was about to buy a DEC Rainbow or IBM PC (the first one) but then the Mac premiered.

I went to the 2nd meeting of the New York Macintosh User Group (we actually named the group that night).

A guy named David Biedny had a Macintosh. He demoed it after the meeting for a good 10 minutes, creating things, painting on-screen, dragging icons around and then he wanted to save a file and name it and -- "Oh, where's the keyboard?" He had already packed it away.

At that moment, I decided that I wanted a Macintosh and in June of 84 I bought a Macintosh. That was the only model ever to be called just "Macintosh"

I've had a dozen Macs since. Never once been sorry. The Macs I have now are 5-6 years old. My G5 tower is pushing 7 and still does everything I need it to do and does it well.

We have had to run Windows from time to time for this or that program, but so rarely as to hardly be worth the mention. These days it has been reported that MacPro Intel laptops actually run Windows better and faster than dedicated Windows laptops. Apple even had an ad for that.

I have 2 older towers a G3 from 1998 and a G4 from 2001 which I am going to bring back into use as email and Internet terminals in my new business. tested them both recently and both still work (had to replace a $20 lithium battery in one of them).

My main Apple LCD displays are 9 and 7 years old and still perform brilliantly in daily use for more than a dozen hours a day.

I still get compliments on my 5 year old 12" PowerBook G4 (happened last Thursday).

Why am I telling you all of this?

Oh yeah, I love my MAC! :)

cosinezero
04-10-10, 02:36 PM
Seriously though, tell me it isn't hilarious that the ultimate end reason for the M$ Mac BU dropping VBA support is that they don't feel like re-coding for Intel. Bwaaaaaaaaaahhahahaha!

-->I can see the humor there; but I personally wouldn't doubt the explaination they've given! I've done my fair share of contract development (read: come fix this hack that the president's son wrote). :)

Often times, in badly hacked code, it's just not good ROI to try to port forward - complete rewrite is often required. And going RISC to CISC? I can't imagine that's a quick port!

Tigger - no problem. We all know the rules. ;) Besides, I have a good bit of respect for apple from an end-user perspective... tho the UI developer in me cringes at a lot of their usability issues. And I just have to own machines that will run visual studio/sql server for my work. I did try to get into iphone dev but objective C is terrrrrrible. C# for the win, anyday.

O'Doyle
04-10-10, 02:43 PM
I've done my fair share of contract development (read: come fix this hack that the president's son wrote).

Yep, been there, except from the hardware side of the shop: "Come here and fix the IT director's computer that his 'genius' son in college for IS built for him. Oh, and don't tell anyone or we'll terminate you. Immediately."

Le sigh.

ADHDTigger
04-10-10, 03:13 PM
Having been on both sides of the IT world- hardware/infrastructure and software/development I can truly tell you, "been there, done that, have all the souvenirs.

Good to know that some things never change...

*sigh*

wsmac
04-10-10, 10:05 PM
I have to reiterate what Tigger has been saying over and over again... OPEN SOURCE!

I don't own a business.
I have been attending college for the last several years.
Whenever I have needed to deal with a MSWord, Excel, or PowerPoint file, I just use NeoOffice... works just fine and it's FREE.

Of course... there are some issues concerning fonts and such, but nothing that ever gave me a hard time.

Instead of photoshop (which I own already), you can get GIMP for free also.

For editing music files, I usually use Audacity... it's FREE too.

For a really good in-between text edit program, I use BEAN... FREE.

For browsing the internet, I have.... FLOCK, Firefox, Camino, OPERA, as well as Safari.

To pull files off of my iPod, I purchased Senuti (around $30)

To rip videos, I purchased RipIt (around $20-$30)

I also have Audio Hijack Pro (around $30) to capture audio off my computer, and the internet.

I have Adium for chat (FREE)

I have Thunderbird for my mail accounts (FREE)

Formulate Pro so I can edit PDF files and print them out

Check here... www dot pure-mac.com

and here... www dot opensource.org

and here... http: slashslash (replace with // ) sourceforge.net

Now... I have to say... there is free software for PC's as well, but there is so much more of the honest, productive, and well-working free software out there for macs in my opinion.

I usually demo something first if there is that option.
Once I determine that it will fill my needs, I keep it or upgrade to a paid version.
I always kick up some dollars to the good folks who produced the software if I keep it and use it.

I have used Windows and Mac machines since the 90's (started out on Big Blue's machines - the kind that were big as fridges and took up large rooms, Olivetti, Monroe, Timex, before that).

I still use Windows at work, but for everything else... it's Mac for me... and my daughter... and now my girlfriend (anyone want to buy a year-old Dell?:p).

My use of the mac aside from the internet, is mostly for music, then images. Someday I will move more into video.

Hopefully you can find a mac store (Apple or private business) where you can actually sit down and use one for a little bit just to see what they're all about.

I know people who have tried macs but stayed with their Windows machines.
The switch over might take some getting used to... or it may not.
You won't be able to determine that until you sit down and try a mac for yourself.

My girlfriend was not a real computer person but bought herself a Dell Inspiron laptop last year.
Once I showed her my old macbook and she tried it, she felt the mac was way more intuitive for her.
The switch was not a problem.

I keep trying to figure out those darn Linux machines and someday I will have one to work/play with.
I just have trouble learning everything from the internet and books.
I've tried to find someone local, but for some reason I can't find any Linux people where I live... at least any who admit it and are willing to spend a bit of time helping me (I'd gladly pay for the experience).

Let us know what you finally decide upon... I'm interested!;)

ADHDTigger
04-11-10, 01:49 PM
WSMAC- Thank you for posting a great list of Open Source resources and some great web links! I am also an Audacity and RipIt fan but chose PodToMac to pull off my iPod files- saved me when I had to rebuild my iTunes library when my last Mac took a hit- but I looked hard at Senuti too. There the deciding factor was purely $$$.

I also use a tool for writing called Scrivener. This is easily the best writing tool I have ever used.

I am a fan of having two browsers available and found Omni to be a top quality tool. But Camino and Opera are great as well.

Want a lightweight anti-virus? Try Clam XAV. There are free and pay versions.

I haven't tried Adium. iChat doesn't support the vehicle I use for chat and if Adium does, I'm there.

I <3 my Mac! And I <3 Open Source!

wsmac
04-11-10, 02:00 PM
Tigger,

Senuti saved my daughter's iPod once:D
It's great not to be at the mercy of others sometimes!

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE give me a list of your fav's:o
I'm always into checking out new stuff!:D

I'll look at scrivener. I used to use simple TextEdit to write html and for quick notes, but Bean has more to offer my, yet isn't a full-on document program so it loads fast and serves most of my needs.

Omni? Gotta go see...;)

ClamX ... yep, I didn't mention it, but I have used it on another computer.

Once I showed Opera to my daughter, she never looked back. She really loves it!

Each of my browsers have certain functions that I really like, and I wish I could just write up my own browser with just the functions I like and use most.
Lately I've been stuck on FLOCK (Mozilla). I really love the easy access to my email accounts, facebook, and other 'net places.

I love the add-ons for Firefox! Although using a mac.. I still have trouble with DownloadHelper and converting flv files.

I forgot to ad that the student discounts on Macs are really worth checking out!
I happen to have student status at my local college and I was able to get a nice discount on my MacBook Pro. I also got a nice discount on my MacBook several years ago and the University I purchased it from had added a few nice things as part of the deal. Same thing with my daughter's MacBook.

The discounts do not bring the price down to PC level, but saving any money is a good thing for me.

wsmac
04-11-10, 02:07 PM
TIGGER! How could you???:mad:

Now I JUST GOTTA HAVE OMNI!;):D:p

Looks really neat!

Can't wait until I tell my daughter. I can hear her now... "ANOTHER BROWSER DAD? That's 6!!!" :rolleyes::p



eta: I'm on it... I like it! Thanks Tigger!:D

ACME
04-11-10, 06:37 PM
Do the long answers in this post really come from people with ADD?

Yes you want it because it's new, cool and your not bored with it.

Same reason I'm saving to purchase one.

O'Doyle
04-11-10, 07:55 PM
Do the long answers in this post really come from people with ADD?

Yes you want it because it's new, cool and your not bored with it.

Oh no: they're on to us :P

chronological
04-11-10, 08:52 PM
I have to commend everyone on this thread for being so NICE to one another.

Shhhh Tigger. You'll jinx all the lurrrv. :)

yogamama
04-12-10, 01:19 AM
You really want a mac. Trust me.

yogamama
04-12-10, 02:28 PM
I LOVE a program called Shovebox. Easy to use and really helps me organize!