View Full Version : Medication as Hibernation!


michinyuja
04-12-10, 04:14 AM
For those of you who have read some of my posts, you know that I am wary of medication and often come across as completely anti-medication.

I had an interesting discussion with a 28-year old client last week.

He told me that medication saved his life. With his socio-economic background, his ADHD would have landed him in jail or worse. Because he was medicated since he was 4 years old, he was able to function in school.

When he was 16, he made the decision to stop using his meds. He quickly began abusing other drugs, so he went back to his ADHD meds.

When he was 18, he wanted to go off his meds again. This time, his parents opposed it. But he prevailed, and went off his meds, then became a journeyman in the marble flooring trade.

Today, he is a successful marble flooring artisan/craftsman.

We talked about how it was a pity that his true personality was basically suppressed during his entire childhood. But the truth is that many of us undergo hurts and traumas that go unnoticed or untreated...it's not like we all have glorious, happy, shining childhoods.

He felt that it was a decent trade off. And I had to agree.

Of course, if there was an alternative that could teach him to develop self-control and learn appropriate responses, that would have been ideal. But since no such alternative existed at that time (and is still scarce now), medication really was the best option for him.

Just wanted to share. :o

TygerSan
04-13-10, 04:53 PM
I think that that's a wonderful story. . .

Medication, in my opinion, is one of *many* tools we can use to function in a world that simply wasn't built for us. Many of us (myself included) had accomodations in place in school, and that's another work around. School is such an artificial environment, and often we are square pegs in round holes, so it's all about the workaround. He's found an environment where he "fits" without his meds, and that's great.

Just for the record, though, I'm not sure that I'd agree that it's the meds that "supressed" his true personality, more the entire situation at hand. The meds could well have been a valuable tool for the time being.

michinyuja
04-14-10, 04:10 AM
really good point~ i hadn't thought of it that way!
again, my bias showing through.

i wasn't that biased years ago!
i think it's the fact that more doctors are rather recklessly prescribing that worries me more than the meds themselves.

you're right though, even without the meds, his personality would have been suppressed and/or damaged by his environment.

thanks!

peachy76
05-11-10, 08:38 PM
Thanks for sharing ...

I find that the only thing meds supresses in my child's personality is his rage .. and I really mean rage .. from the moment he came out of my belly and probably before ..

He would get so angry that he would forget to breathe and turn blue. Though he was having heart problems and was scared to death but they told me it was rage and that he was going to be a very enraged person ..lol wasn't laughing back then .. when he was a toddler, I would have to hold him in my arms for hours until he eventually calmed down. He would endanger himself or others. He got his fathers temper and add.

The meds actually toss aside most of that rage and show my child for the beautiful person he is.

Some say a kid on these meds looks like a zombie .. I would never allow my kids to take these meds if that were true for them. Just is not .. I think kids who don't really have add or who are overmedicated might look like zombies.

But it shouldn't be, the meds should heal .. temporarily... and thus bring out the best in the person on various levels.

I don,t think that the meds are working properly if a child's personality is supressed. They should be just as spontanious, creative etc... and if not, there is a serious problem in my opinion.

I have the same reaction when I take ritalin, only take it when I work and am not right now. I shine and become my true self. When not on the meds, I have problems expressing myself, following conversations and am unable to communicate properly. Don't know why, that's just how it is.

I also think the man was better off with the meds .. we never know for sure though.

The parents are usually right in my opinion, those who choose to use the meds as much as those who don't. Many children are misdiagnosed as you say and this might be the reason for some not wanting .. they might just be right !

and actually, when the child is really add ... I wonder how one could survive without .. it's totally nuts ..

Sit-n-Spin
05-11-10, 08:52 PM
For those of you who have read some of my posts, you know that I am wary of medication and often come across as completely anti-medication.

I had an interesting discussion with a 28-year old client last week.

He told me that medication saved his life. With his socio-economic background, his ADHD would have landed him in jail or worse. Because he was medicated since he was 4 years old, he was able to function in school.

When he was 16, he made the decision to stop using his meds. He quickly began abusing other drugs, so he went back to his ADHD meds.

When he was 18, he wanted to go off his meds again. This time, his parents opposed it. But he prevailed, and went off his meds, then became a journeyman in the marble flooring trade.

Today, he is a successful marble flooring artisan/craftsman.

We talked about how it was a pity that his true personality was basically suppressed during his entire childhood. But the truth is that many of us undergo hurts and traumas that go unnoticed or untreated...it's not like we all have glorious, happy, shining childhoods.

He felt that it was a decent trade off. And I had to agree.

Of course, if there was an alternative that could teach him to develop self-control and learn appropriate responses, that would have been ideal. But since no such alternative existed at that time (and is still scarce now), medication really was the best option for him.

Just wanted to share. :o

This sounds like some people I grew up with, but our socio-economic background was privileged. So, I think that speaks to how powerful this disorder is, and that it does need to be treated. It is not about a poor upbringing, poor manners, lack of other resources, education, and so on.