View Full Version : Vitamin D


Sit-n-Spin
05-08-10, 09:39 AM
Is there any correlation with vitamin D deficiencies and ADD?

I just had my thyroid, iron, etc. checked because of that scalp rash (reaction to meds) and hair loss (probably due to going off birth control) and asked to have my D levels checked again. I had a severe deficiency a couple of years ago. This time it shows as about 12, and should be around 32, I think. I'm on 50,000 IUs a week of D for eight weeks.

Does anyone else have this problem?

Krys.
05-08-10, 12:21 PM
I would not be a bit surprised to learn that they are connected. I did read somewhere that a Vitamin D deficiency has the potential to lead to a misdiagnosis of ADHD but I don't remember where I read it. Science is constantly finding new things that Vitamin D is good for. So I wasn't surprised to learn about it's effects on the brain. Apparently vitamin D plays a significant role in brain development and function.

There is more info here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080421072159.htm

EshkaronsEngine
05-08-10, 12:25 PM
I love vitamin D. I noticed when I got pressure in my head that if I took a vitamin D pill it went away. This along with vitamin C are my staple vitamins as I like to tank up on them when I smoke cigarettes.:)

Sit-n-Spin
05-08-10, 12:58 PM
I was thinking maybe AD/HD caused the deficiency. When I was younger I was in the sun all the time. I even tanned up to about age 30. Yet, still had all the ADD symptoms. However, I've had the D deficiencies in the last few years. I know I don't get out in the sun like I used to, but other people don't and don't have such deficiencies. I don't know...

Imnapl
05-08-10, 01:07 PM
Our local news station just ran a report on Vitamin D deficiency. Most Canadians are deficient due to our long winters (short days) so many of us who work indoors can't depend on sunshine. I don't remember any research showing that there are more people in Canada than other countries.

Our milk is fortified with Vitamin D, but you would have to drink a lot of milk to meet your needs. Here's (http://www.arthritis.ca/tips%20for%20living/complementary%20therapies/types/supplements/vitamind/default.asp?s=1&province=ns) something about Vitamin D from the Canadian Arthritis Society. Vitamin D is an inexpensive supplement to purchase.

Imnapl
05-08-10, 01:12 PM
I love vitamin D. I noticed when I got pressure in my head that if I took a vitamin D pill it went away. This along with vitamin C are my staple vitamins as I like to tank up on them when I smoke cigarettes.:)I doubt that one Vitamin D pill would be enough to remove a vitamin deficiency. Cigarettes deplite Vitamin C big time.

Sit-n-Spin
05-10-10, 09:17 AM
Smoking will deplete nutrients. I've read that taking beta carotene (vit A) supplements can actually increase the chance of cancer in smokers, although getting it in food form does not. Interesting, huh?

Nick
05-13-10, 01:00 PM
All the studies are pointing at Vitamin D as being a miracle substance, and I believe it's true.

Just think about it. Throughout human history, most people were outside in the sun with minimal clothing, working all day etc.

Now most of us wear lots of clothing and sit indoors. We aren't getting the amount of D that we need. And I think just due to our past nature, we really require a lot of Vitamin D for proper functioning.

So we must supplement. To the original poster, that sounds like a lot of Vitamin D. Might be too much. I would say say a few thousand IU a day and just keep taking that.

Sit-n-Spin
05-13-10, 05:15 PM
This was prescribed because my levels are so low. Then I'll go back to a normal amount. 1-2,000 a day is about right. Plus calcium. I just took my 2nd (week) dose.

Studies show that people closer to the equator have fewer forms of any cancer because of sun exposure. The problem is only when people burn in the sun, not from getting sun at all. My great-grandparents' generation in my family lived to over 100 (many women did), and they did not eat processed food and went outside a lot because many were farmers. They did not tan because that was a sign of lower class then (no thanks to Coco Channel who made it fashionable to tan), but still got enough sun for their vitamin D. I think those two factors are key to why they lived so long and subsequent generations have not, although we still have a good lifespan. They also got more exercise and better sleep without all the current artificial lights and 24/7 technology.

I also wonder if migration from continents didn't mess us up in this regard. People with darker skin living in less sunny areas need to stay out longer than those with fair skin. And really fair people burn in too intense sun. What I mean by that is that I think we were evolved in many ways, including our skin, to certain climates, but then overrode it with migration.

Marspider
05-13-10, 07:46 PM
People's skin color corresponds to UV levels around the world. The more UV levels where you live, the darker you are. So move to a place with lots of UV, after a couple of thousands of years you will get darker, and vice versa. One of the few exceptions to the rule are the Inuit who are darker than they should be at the climate they are. They haven't been there that long though and they eat a lot of seal liver which has Vitamin D. I think another group were the Tasmanians. But they weren't in Tasmania that long either.
Migration is not messing skin colour, humans have been migrating since the beginning of time and they adapt their skin colour. People don't get assigned the place they live in according to their skin colour.

The people in your family were lucky because there were much more people in the past who didn't live to 100 or thereabouts and were farmers and got Vitamin D.
I'm not saying Vitamin D is not good, I'm taking quite a lot myself.

This was prescribed because my levels are so low. Then I'll go back to a normal amount. 1-2,000 a day is about right. Plus calcium. I just took my 2nd (week) dose.

Studies show that people closer to the equator have fewer forms of any cancer because of sun exposure. The problem is only when people burn in the sun, not from getting sun at all. My great-grandparents' generation in my family lived to over 100 (many women did), and they did not eat processed food and went outside a lot because many were farmers. They did not tan because that was a sign of lower class then (no thanks to Coco Channel who made it fashionable to tan), but still got enough sun for their vitamin D. I think those two factors are key to why they lived so long and subsequent generations have not, although we still have a good lifespan. They also got more exercise and better sleep without all the current artificial lights and 24/7 technology.

I also wonder if migration from continents didn't mess us up in this regard. People with darker skin living in less sunny areas need to stay out longer than those with fair skin. And really fair people burn in too intense sun. What I mean by that is that I think we were evolved in many ways, including our skin, to certain climates, but then overrode it with migration.

Sit-n-Spin
05-13-10, 08:06 PM
I didn't mean people "get assigned" based on their skin color, but had the skin color based on their environment, which then (the environment) changed. Nor did I say that migration messes with skin color, but that migration to climates that are drastically different esp regarding skin color and vitamin D production has led to a variety of health problems.

Tabbycat
05-14-10, 11:37 PM
Just wanted to say that I was diagnosed with Vitamin D deficiency about a year ago. My level was (wait for it) - 4! Lowest my pdoc had ever seen. NO idea how long I'd been low (I was a good girl and stopped tanning, etc. in my early 20's).

I was outdoors a lot too as a child, was not diagnosed w/ADD until age 38. Your thought about whether or not there might be a link is interesting. Definitely something I'll be thinking about.

Initially I was put on 50,000 IU a week, now take 5,000 IU a day. Haven't been re-tested in a while, need to see where the number is at these days.

Marspider
05-15-10, 01:59 PM
It doesn't necessarily have to lead to health problems, the trick is getting enough. Like I mentioned, the Inuit are darker than they should be at the latitudes they live at because they get enough Vitamin D from liver and not the sun.
A dark skinned person is more likely to have a Vitamin D deficiency at temperate climates with not enough UV light but that doesn't mean they will have a vitamin D deficiency if they are careful. Mediterranean people have lived in the Mediterranean for millenia, but there are lots of Spanish people with Vitamin D deficiency although the sun is pouring down. (I'm Spanish.) Most milk in Spain is not fortified.
And not every pale skinned Australian has health problems.
Vitamin D is important but there are also lots of variables.

I didn't mean people "get assigned" based on their skin color, but had the skin color based on their environment, which then (the environment) changed. Nor did I say that migration messes with skin color, but that migration to climates that are drastically different esp regarding skin color and vitamin D production has led to a variety of health problems.

Tara
05-15-10, 02:52 PM
Try Googling Dr. Charles Parker to read his stuff on Vitamin D and ADHD.

Imnapl
05-29-10, 03:43 PM
Try Googling Dr. Charles Parker to read his stuff on Vitamin D and ADHD.I did and found this (http://www.metametrixinstitute.org/post/2009/08/06/How-Much-Vitamin-D.aspx):

Question 2: How much sunshine or vitamin D supplementation should you use? Answer:
<table border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="2"> <tbody> <tr> <td> 1000 IU/day vitamin D, </td> </tr> <tr> <td> plus 400 IUs in a multivitamin, </td> </tr> <tr> <td> plus 10 to 15 minutes of sun exposure/average/per day
(depending on location). </td></tr></tbody></table>