View Full Version : Sensory... What is it?


AmyAcer
05-10-10, 12:41 PM
Can someone explain to me what this is?:confused:

Marspider
05-10-10, 01:55 PM
Hi Simplebear, sorry to confuse you.

It's sensory integration disorder where senses can be oversensitive or undersensitive or sometimes both.

I discovered my difficulties with showers due to reading about dyspraxia when I was diagnosed with it, I also hate it when I'm outside and it starts raining. One book I found really helpful was Life Skills by Jan Poustie. She's based in the UK and I don't know how easy it might be to get the book outside of the UK but it's helpful. Anyway, in your earlier post about gagging on toothpaste, I thought it might be some aspect of sensory integration disorder.

These are some signs of sensory integration disorder:


http://www.hopscotchtherapy.co.uk/sensoryintegration.html
A Checklist for Problems in Sensory Modulation

Some characteristics of poor sensory modulation are listed below. The following characteristics include some of the symptoms of a problem in sensory modulation.
● Aversion or struggle when picked up, hugged, or cuddled
● Aversion to certain daily life activities, including baths or showers, cutting of fingernails, haircuts, face washing and dental work
● Responding with aggression to light or unexpected touch to arms, face, legs
● Avoidance of certain styles or textures of clothing (e.g. scratchy)
● Avoidance of play activities that involve body contact
● Dislike getting hands in sand, finger-paint, paste
● Exaggerated fear of falling or heights
● Become anxious when feet leave the ground
● Seem particularly slow at movements
● Avoid jumping down from higher surfaces
● Avoid climbing, escalators, or elevators
● Seem to misunderstand what is said
● Have difficulty looking and listening at the same time
● Seem distracted if there is a lot of noise around
● Hold hands over ears
● Gag easily with food in mouth
● Picky eater
● Mouth objects
● Express discomfort with light
● Rock unconsciously
● Become overly excitable during movement activities
● Be "on the go"
● Be slower than others to respond to sensation

Can someone explain to me what this is?:confused:

AmyAcer
05-10-10, 02:10 PM
i put in bold the ones that sound like me...


A Checklist for Problems in Sensory Modulation

Some characteristics of poor sensory modulation are listed below. The following characteristics include some of the symptoms of a problem in sensory modulation.
● Aversion or struggle when picked up, hugged, or cuddled
● Aversion to certain daily life activities, including baths or showers, cutting of fingernails, haircuts, face washing and dental work
● Responding with aggression to light or unexpected touch to arms, face, legs
● Avoidance of certain styles or textures of clothing (e.g. scratchy)
● Avoidance of play activities that involve body contact
● Dislike getting hands in sand, finger-paint, paste
● Exaggerated fear of falling or heights
● Become anxious when feet leave the ground
● Seem particularly slow at movements
● Avoid jumping down from higher surfaces
● Avoid climbing, escalators, or elevators
● Seem to misunderstand what is said
● Have difficulty looking and listening at the same time
● Seem distracted if there is a lot of noise around
● Hold hands over ears
● Gag easily with food in mouth
● Picky eater
● Mouth objects
● Express discomfort with light
● Rock unconsciously
● Become overly excitable during movement activities
● Be "on the go"
● Be slower than others to respond to sensation



Thoughts?

AmyAcer
05-17-10, 08:06 AM
I guess no one has any thoughts:(

stef
05-17-10, 08:19 AM
these are mine:

● Aversion or struggle when picked up, hugged, or cuddled (depends on who & the circumstances. dislike the french custom of half-kissing cheeks in greeting except for people I know really well).
● Aversion to certain daily life activities, including baths or showers, cutting of fingernails, haircuts, face washing and dental work
● Responding with aggression to light or unexpected touch to arms, face, legs
● Avoidance of certain styles or textures of clothing (e.g. scratchy)
● Avoidance of play activities that involve body contact
● Dislike getting hands in sand, finger-paint, paste
● Exaggerated fear of falling or heights
● Become anxious when feet leave the ground
● Seem particularly slow at movements
● Avoid jumping down from higher surfaces
● Avoid climbing, escalators, or elevators
● Seem to misunderstand what is said
● Have difficulty looking and listening at the same time
● Seem distracted if there is a lot of noise around
● Hold hands over ears
● Gag easily with food in mouth
● Picky eater
● Mouth objects
● Express discomfort with light
● Rock unconsciously
● Become overly excitable during movement activities
● Be "on the go"
● Be slower than others to respond to sensation

...I wonder how many of these you have to have to be considered as having this disorder?

sarek
05-17-10, 08:55 AM
By no means conclusive but here is my list. I wonder which is caused by which. Being on the go is as much a sign of H as it is of sensory issues.

● Aversion or struggle when picked up, hugged, or cuddled
● Aversion to certain daily life activities, including baths or showers, cutting of fingernails, haircuts, face washing and dental work
● Responding with aggression to light or unexpected touch to arms, face, legs
● Avoidance of certain styles or textures of clothing (e.g. scratchy)
● Avoidance of play activities that involve body contact
● Dislike getting hands in sand, finger-paint, paste
● Exaggerated fear of falling or heights
● Become anxious when feet leave the ground
● Seem particularly slow at movements
● Avoid jumping down from higher surfaces
● Avoid climbing, escalators, or elevators
● Seem to misunderstand what is said
● Have difficulty looking and listening at the same time
● Seem distracted if there is a lot of noise around
● Hold hands over ears
● Gag easily with food in mouth
● Picky eater
● Mouth objects
● Express discomfort with light
● Rock unconsciously
● Become overly excitable during movement activities
● Be "on the go"
● Be slower than others to respond to sensation

Kids Think
05-24-10, 12:06 AM
Hi Simplebear.

I'm an Occupational Therapist. If you have any specific questions regarding sensory processing disorder, please post them, and I'd be happyto try to address them.

Scooter77
05-24-10, 04:26 AM
Hi Simplebear.

I'm an Occupational Therapist. If you have any specific questions regarding sensory processing disorder, please post them, and I'd be happyto try to address them.
I was wondering....

Is this 'the' list of symptoms?
Does a person have to meet a certain amount of them?
Are there different types?

ha ha, could you just give a brief idea of what, how, why....& anything else relevant!!
Thankyou in advance :-)

Kids Think
05-25-10, 10:08 AM
Hi Scooter,

Sensory processing disorder (SPD) is not an official diagnosis yet. The American Psychiatric Association is considering it for inclusion into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V. So for now there isn't really a list of "symptoms" needed to qualify for a diagnosis, as is the case with other disorders.

The way we think of SPD nowadays is in three distinct manifestations, or types, of the disorder. Instead of reinventing the wheel, I'm quoting Wikipedia's entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensory_processing_disorder) on SPD, which I think is very nicely and accurately written.



There are now three types of Sensory Processing Disorder, as classified by Stanley I. Greenspan as supported by the research of Lucy J. Miller, Ph.D., OTR. These new terms are meant to increase understanding between Occupational Therapists and other professionals who frequently encounter SID and physicians and other health professionals who approach sensory integration dysfunction from a more neurobiological vantage.
This understanding is critical as physicians are responsible for diagnosing SPD, which is a necessary step in accessing reimbursement (eventually from insurance companies) for professional services to treat SPD.
Sensory Processing Dysfunction is being used as a global umbrella term that includes all forms of this disorder, including three primary diagnostic groups:


Type I - Sensory Modulation Disorder
Type II - Sensory Based Motor Disorder
Type III - Sensory Discrimination Disorder

Type I - Sensory Modulation Disorder (SMD). Over, or under responding to sensory stimuli or seeking sensory stimulation. This group may include a fearful and/or anxious pattern, negative and/or stubborn behaviors, self-absorbed behaviors that are difficult to engage or creative or actively seeking sensation.

Type II - Sensory Based Motor Disorder (SBMD). Shows motor output that is disorganized as a result of incorrect processing of sensory information affecting postural control challenges and/or motor planning dyspraxia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyspraxia).

Type III - Sensory Discrimination Disorder (SDD). Sensory discrimination or incorrect processing of sensory information. Incorrect processing of visiual or auditory input, for example, may be seen in inattentiveness, disorganization, and poor school performance.
Sensory modulation

Sensory modulation refers to a complex central nervous system process by which neural messages that convey information about the intensity, frequency, duration, complexity, and novelty of sensory stimuli are adjusted.
Behaviorally, this is manifested in the tendency to generate responses that are appropriately graded in relation to incoming sensations, neither underreacting nor overreacting to them.
Sensory Modulation Problems



Sensory registration problems - This refers to the process by which the central nervous system attends to stimuli. This usually involves an orienting response. Sensory registration problems are characterized by failure to notice stimuli that ordinarily are salient to most people.
Sensory defensiveness - A condition characterized by over-responsivity in one or more systems.
Gravitational insecurity - A sensory modulation condition in which there is a tendency to react negatively and fearfully to movement experiences, particularly those involving a change in head position and movement backward or upward through space.


For all of you who have sensory issues or who have children with sensory issues, here's a great and adorable flyer (http://www.sensorystreet.com/uploads/Do_You_Know_Me_-_general.pdf) that sums it all up. Enjoy.