View Full Version : building your own computer


EYEFORGOT
05-15-10, 02:20 PM
We're thinking of letting our soon-to-be-teenager have his own computer, but we'd like him to learn (along with us) how to build one.

Am I correct that it can be/is cheaper than buying one?

Does anyone have any advice on getting started? Or reliable websites?

AliKatski
05-15-10, 02:37 PM
It can be cheaper - it depends on the hardware you choose - cheapy deals from chainstores are generally good entry-level computers but if he wants to learn, try {http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/}

Good luck :-)

sarek
05-15-10, 02:57 PM
I dont know about websites, the one I use mainly is a Dutch language one.

I think the key is to build the thing up systematically. Its all in the compatibilities of the components.

You would first define what you want the machine to do. Questions include but are not limited to:

- working memory requirements
- graphics abilities(game grapics cards?)
sound
-storage
-networking(wired/wireless)
- Maybe you want a single HD or multiple ones for added storage and safety. Maybe even some kind of hardware RAID configuration for which you may need a controller on the board.

These decisions will determine the number and nature of slots you need on the mainboard and the size of the case.

Building:
I think you should start with selecting the case and the mainboard. The chipset on the mainboard defines which processors it will be able to take. The slots depend on the outcome of the questions above.

I can not guarantee that building from components will be cheaper but it will give you added flexibility.

Retromancer
05-15-10, 04:00 PM
In my city there are a couple of firms that take in donated old/surplus computers and other electronic gear -- keeping them out of the waste stream -- check them out, possibly upgrade them and then sell them. (Do I need to say thanks to the economy a lot of corporate equipment became surplus?)

I have a quite serviceable Pentium 4 Dell tower that I bought this way for 200 bucks. Mine came with Windows XP installed. If you can install your own operating system -- think Linux -- you can save even more.

The crew at the firm have been quite happy to answer any questions I have had.

We're thinking of letting our soon-to-be-teenager have his own computer, but we'd like him to learn (along with us) how to build one.

Am I correct that it can be/is cheaper than buying one?

Does anyone have any advice on getting started? Or reliable websites?

Addr68
05-15-10, 05:58 PM
I'm drawn to this site: tigerdirect.com

They have a great pictorial techie section and anything over 100.00, there is no S/H fee Plus no taxes in most states.

They will walk you thru on what type of pc you desire :) i.e gammer, business, for students etc...

I beleive the section is called 'bare bones' or 'build your own'

Very informative :)

Another one is 'newegg.com'

I like your concept Chel, teaching him and learning along the way on how to build a pc.. Much value in this!

I first looked at what type of pc do I want..'my needs' then I looked at the 'Bare bones' and the Hardware needed.
Next, checking out the already built pc's..and seeing what is cheaper, in the long run..
One good thing about most of today's pc's ..they are upgradable..That is fun in itself :)

I elected to get an already built gamming pc, from tigerdirect. Cost was really good for a mid grade gammer.. I have plenty of room to expand..as my needs grow ;)
Most websites like tigerdirect or newegg, use 'drop orders', for ready to go pc's..

They are the middle man..and they place the order for you to the manufacture..

nonADHDer
05-15-10, 06:41 PM
We're thinking of letting our soon-to-be-teenager have his own computer, but we'd like him to learn (along with us) how to build one.

Am I correct that it can be/is cheaper than buying one?

Does anyone have any advice on getting started? Or reliable websites?

I'd say the best way to learn to build a computer is to figure out for yourself. You can also read one of the ample guides out there, such as:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/116993/your_ideal_pc.html

Whatever you decide, assembling PCs is a simple and not very time consuming activity. Once you have all the parts and a decent operating system, I don't see why you couldn't do it in an hour tops.