View Full Version : Buzz: A Year of Paying Attention


Lunacie
10-08-10, 03:51 PM
I think is where I should post this - it pertains to both children and adults, in a parent-child context though. I just listened to a podcast of a show on National Public Radio called "Paying Attention - With an ADHD Mother and Son". (http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=130404201)Thought I'd share the link in case anyone else wants to take a listen or read the transcript.

This is a parent describing her life with an ADHD child and the realization that she also has ADHD herself. I like how she talks about the reactions from people who dismiss ADHD (oh, we all do that sometimes - but ADHDers do it nearly all the time), pointed out the fact that research clearly shows a genetic cause, how hard it is on a family and on a marriage to have a child with ADHD, that while there is some overdiagnosis the bigger problem is underdiagnosis because of disbelief in the diagnosis itself, and about media reports on how horrible medication is based on very little research that is sometimes disproven but the media doesn't bother to report that.

The book this mother wrote is called "Buzz: A Year of Paying Attention." It looks like a good book. Wish I could afford to buy a copy rather than waiting for interlibrary loan to get a copy that I can check out.

HollyBowers
10-25-10, 12:30 AM
I bought the book on my e-reader 5 minutes after reading a brief review in a magazine. I can't much relate to having an ADHD child (no kids yet) or hyperactive type, but it was VERY interesting and got me thinking about a lot of things. She researched many different areas, with quite fascinating results.

StoicNate
10-25-10, 02:47 AM
It's great that there's positive things like this on ADHD.

There should be more positive sort of edge towards ADHD, since a lot of uninformed people out there still are in denial about it.

Lunacie
10-25-10, 10:21 AM
I bought the book on my e-reader 5 minutes after reading a brief review in a magazine. I can't much relate to having an ADHD child (no kids yet) or hyperactive type, but it was VERY interesting and got me thinking about a lot of things. She researched many different areas, with quite fascinating results.

I wish I could afford to buy the book. Please let us know what you think after reading it? The author (mom) seemed like she had a good head on her shoulders.

HollyBowers
10-27-10, 02:53 PM
It's a shame I got it in e-book format, or I'd offer to mail it out. :( I just couldn't wait to have it delivered.

It's pretty good. Someone in the comments on that article complains that she is too negative about her child. I think that is possible, but when "Buzz" eventually comes to read it, he WILL know that he is loved. I think it is very realistic about life with an ADHD child. I don't say that because I know what it's like or anything... I'm not a parent... but she doesn't seem to hold anything back.

I think it would appeal to anyone with a hyperactive child, or those of us who may have one in the future and would like to be prepared.
It didn't offer many answers to anything. It was more of a memoir than a self-help book or a "you should try this treatment!" kind of thing, but there were some interesting things I'd like to follow up.
One of these was the section on neurofeedback-- re-training the brain using EEG feedback. I have just signed up for biofeedback to help with stress through university, so I'm excited to go and ask the therapist doing it what she thinks.

Lunacie
10-27-10, 03:15 PM
It's a shame I got it in e-book format, or I'd offer to mail it out. :( I just couldn't wait to have it delivered.

It's pretty good. Someone in the comments on that article complains that she is too negative about her child. I think that is possible, but when "Buzz" eventually comes to read it, he WILL know that he is loved. I think it is very realistic about life with an ADHD child. I don't say that because I know what it's like or anything... I'm not a parent... but she doesn't seem to hold anything back.

I think it would appeal to anyone with a hyperactive child, or those of us who may have one in the future and would like to be prepared.
It didn't offer many answers to anything. It was more of a memoir than a self-help book or a "you should try this treatment!" kind of thing, but there were some interesting things I'd like to follow up.
One of these was the section on neurofeedback-- re-training the brain using EEG feedback. I have just signed up for biofeedback to help with stress through university, so I'm excited to go and ask the therapist doing it what she thinks.

Thanks for the review. Even a book that doesn't provide answers but just lets us know we're not alone can be a big help. I've wondered about using bio-feedback for my grandchild who has Autism. Really hadn't considered whether it would help the older one who has ADHD. If you try this, please let me know whether you find it helpful?