View Full Version : Does this sound like aspergers?


Spikey 723
10-27-10, 07:15 AM
I am unable to remember faces of people I just meet.

For example, at uni I was in a group for one of our classes. We had to meet outside class time to prepare a session. We arranged to meet in the library at a certain time HOWEVER I knew that I wouldn't be able to remember what they looked like.

I am ok now we have had a few sessions, but the first time I had no clue. I just went to the specified place and waited for someone to say 'hi'.

I have ADD, and in the new year I'm having an assessment for aspergers.

Abi
10-27-10, 07:25 AM
Search for "Autism Quotient"

There is a thread here with a link to a quiz you can take.

Like all such quizzes, it is not in any way diagnostic.

A score of 32 or higher suggests that you may have Asperger's

The average score amoung NTers is 16.

I scored 24, and am pretty sure I'm not Aspie. I know people who scored +- 30 who are also not Aspie, so don't take the results too seriously.

Remember ADHD and anxiety symptoms can mimic the symptoms of Asperger's

Spikey 723
10-27-10, 08:12 AM
Did the test - got a 33!

Though I knew I had ADD before the diagnosis (sorry - treatment cos I'm not diagnosed) I never thought about aspergers.

However the doctor at my Adult ADHD Clinic is also interested in aspergers - and he said 20% of people with ADHD also have it. But I've never heard that anywhere else.

Spikey 723
02-23-11, 08:42 AM
Had assessment for aspergers yesterday - and totally forgot to mention this!!

Thinking on it today - many things I should have brought up, but didn't.

However, had 2 hr appointment - so covered a pretty lot!

fracturedstory
02-24-11, 12:15 AM
It's called Prosopagnosia or face blindness. Common int he autistic spectrum but also may happen outside of it. Even some NT's have it.

Spikey 723
02-26-11, 09:09 AM
It's called Prosopagnosia or face blindness. Common int he autistic spectrum but also may happen outside of it. Even some NT's have it.

I only have the problem when I first meet people.

After a bit it doesn't happen.

I'm terrible with names though!

nova2012
02-26-11, 04:17 PM
It's called Prosopagnosia or face blindness. Common int he autistic spectrum but also may happen outside of it. Even some NT's have it.

My dad has this pretty severely and is definitely not autistic.

FaithofLeap
02-26-11, 04:35 PM
I scored a 35.

I have a hard time with faces. If I do get used to somebody's face and they do something to change their appearance such as shaving their beard, it can be embarrassing. I hate it when I have to pretend to remember somebody when they recognize me somewhere.

Jr1985
02-26-11, 06:32 PM
I don't have face-blindness, but I sometimes forget the names of people who I've know for ages. My mind just goes blank and I avoid saying anything that would require using their name.

Spikey 723
02-26-11, 06:36 PM
My son does loads of activities, and consequently we have lots of acquaintances. When I bump into someone at an unexpected place, like shopping, I can rarely place where they are from.

I've become an expert in chatting about absolutely nothing, cos I don't know what our common interest is!

Nitz
02-27-11, 02:22 PM
I scored 43. :eek:

I can actually deny and rationallize all autistic-like sympthoms using severe ADHD & a mainly visual memory, but I've decided to stop denying the fact I have some serious social difficulties. My mom hasn't.

Had assessment for aspergers yesterday - and totally forgot to mention this!!

Thinking on it today - many things I should have brought up, but didn't.

However, had 2 hr appointment - so covered a pretty lot!

So...do you have Assburger's? :D

It's called Prosopagnosia or face blindness. Common int he autistic spectrum but also may happen outside of it. Even some NT's have it.

My ex.

I scored a 35.

I have a hard time with faces. If I do get used to somebody's face and they do something to change their appearance such as shaving their beard, it can be embarrassing. I hate it when I have to pretend to remember somebody when they recognize me somewhere.

I have no idea if I am good or aweful at remembering faces, because my mind literally takes a picture of many unique things about their look (hairstyle, wrinkles, a specific mark on their face, etc.). I should be better than most people at remembering faces, since my memory is mainly visual (I use ADHD as an excuse: I CAN'T REMEMBER TASKS UNLESS I WRITE THEM IN PRETTY COLORS!!!) (The reason I began listening to music was to improve my verbal memory. I failed so hard, associated pictures are used to store lyrics now...XD)

Spikey 723
02-27-11, 02:30 PM
So...do you have Assburger's? :D





I was diagnosed with atypical aspergers. Didn't add it to this thread cos I'd already mentioned it in other threads!

fracturedstory
02-27-11, 08:08 PM
I'm bad at remembering faces and names. I'm good at remembering haircuts and clothes though.
Funny how so many people with ADHD deny having any autistic symptoms and saying it's just ADHD. Don't worry, I know people with AS that are just like that. I guess there's a stigma to both disorders people want to avoid having anything to do with. And if you are stronger in ADHD symptoms than AS/autism you can be content enough saying you just have that.

I can just tell with me. I can separate all my symptoms into the appropriate diagnosis's. My autism is of course the most severe but my ADHD is also very impairing.

Fortune
02-27-11, 09:32 PM
I tried and failed to explain all my AS symptoms as ADHD. I'm glad I failed at it, however. I feel much better knowing I have both.

I'm bad with names and apparently inconsistent with faces. I don't think I have prosopagnosia, but I do seem to have issue with remembering faces.

Jr1985
03-01-11, 02:35 PM
I tried and failed to explain all my AS symptoms as ADHD. I'm glad I failed at it, however. I feel much better knowing I have both.

I'm bad with names and apparently inconsistent with faces. I don't think I have prosopagnosia, but I do seem to have issue with remembering faces.
I'm was the opposite, I thought all of my symptoms were because of AS, but having researched ADHD, I'm now convinced I have both. I actually hope i have both, because the ADHD symptoms can be treated with medication, where AS can't.

From the DSM diagnostic criteria, AS symtoms are all about the impaired social interaction and stereotyped behaviour.

ADHD is all about attention, memory, etc and hyperactivity/impulsivity (obviously). People with AS can have problems with attention, etc but I guess these problems can be so severe that you can have a dual diagnosis.

Fortune
03-01-11, 03:36 PM
There are executive function impairments directly related to ASDs as well, although they're not mentioned in the criteria, at least not directly. They're alluded to, but not with a sense of this being what they are.

The DSM criteria barely scratches the surface of what ASDs are about.

Jr1985
03-01-11, 03:38 PM
So.. if people with AS have executive dysfunction, and people with ADHD have executive dysfuntion.. how do you know you don't just have AS?

Fortune
03-01-11, 03:48 PM
Not all executive dysfunction is the same.

I think ASDs (not just Asperger's) have somewhat distinctive executive function issues that overlap with but are not the same as ADHD.

And if you meet the criteria for ADHD and some level of ADHD medication helps, does it matter?

Jr1985
03-01-11, 03:52 PM
Not all executive dysfunction is the same.

I think ASDs (not just Asperger's) have somewhat distinctive executive function issues that overlap with but are not the same as ADHD.

And if you meet the criteria for ADHD and some level of ADHD medication helps, does it matter?
Nope, it doesn't. I suppose I'm wondering how I will respond if the psychiatrist doing the assessment brings it up.

Fortune
03-01-11, 04:10 PM
I am not sure that most psychiatrists are likely to think about ASDs in terms of executive dysfunction, as most of the literature doesn't seem to go there (but Tony Attwood does, so I could be wrong). If your psych is up on it, the he or she knows ADHD is a common comorbid.

fracturedstory
03-01-11, 08:33 PM
I'm was the opposite, I thought all of my symptoms were because of AS, but having researched ADHD, I'm now convinced I have both. I actually hope i have both, because the ADHD symptoms can be treated with medication, where AS can't.

From the DSM diagnostic criteria, AS symtoms are all about the impaired social interaction and stereotyped behaviour.

ADHD is all about attention, memory, etc and hyperactivity/impulsivity (obviously). People with AS can have problems with attention, etc but I guess these problems can be so severe that you can have a dual diagnosis.
It's far more than impaired social interaction and repetitive movements. Impaired social interaction is a huge part of it, but repetitive movements are more severe in autism. Repetition in AS is more about routines, stimming (repetitive movement to calm down), eating the same, dressing in the same clothes, not liking change, etc.
There's also motor skill issues, sensory issues, and like Fortune said, some executive dysfunction issues. But I don't think the EF issues are as severe as in ADHD. All that failing to recognise sarcasm, disliking change and problems relating to people are related to executive function. I think where people with AS have strengths is when they can organise themselves. It's almost a stubbornness at perfection.

Sorry if I sound too straight forward but I'm struggling to see how one can't see the difference.
Many with AS have a very detailed long term memory and people with ADHD often struggle with both short term and long term memory. Some might have an ok memory but not to the extent someone with just AS has a good long term memory.
People with AS will have intense interests. They could spend days or months or even years on it. They lose sleep and forget to eat or even at times lose touch with the outside world because they are spending too much time on their special interests. Then there are some that only want to talk about their interests and some that can only think about their special interests.

AS is about poor social skills, a lack of theory of mind, some sensory issues and poor motor skills. The more younger you are the more noticeable the symptoms are but if you're an adult and grew out of some of theses traits then it will be harder to diagnose.

Fortune
03-01-11, 09:26 PM
I don't think AS is about poor social skills. I think there's a definite impairment to social functioning on a deeper level than simply learning to socialize. Or perhaps AS starts at a much lower skill level with more cognitive overhead to achieve social functioning than others have.

Then again, I think the surface symptoms are signs of deeper neurological differences that is the source of stuff like thinking and perceiving differently.

I can see how people can confuse them, because there's a tendency to find an answer and pin everything on it, and both ADHD and AS are pervasive in that without an external frame of reference, they might not be completely noticeable. as differences.

I also read a study that indicated that executive dysfunction in ASDs is variable from person to person and not at all dependent on how obvious (severe) the DSM-IV symptoms are. It's entirely possible that some people are dealing with more severe issues than ADHD might cause, and of course the combination is not helpful at all.

Jr1985
03-02-11, 07:54 AM
It's far more than impaired social interaction and repetitive movements. Impaired social interaction is a huge part of it, but repetitive movements are more severe in autism. Repetition in AS is more about routines, stimming (repetitive movement to calm down), eating the same, dressing in the same clothes, not liking change, etc.
Stereotyped behaviour includes all of what you mentioned, according to the DSM.

There's also motor skill issues, sensory issues, and like Fortune said, some executive dysfunction issues. But I don't think the EF issues are as severe as in ADHD. All that failing to recognise sarcasm, disliking change and problems relating to people are related to executive function. I think where people with AS have strengths is when they can organise themselves. It's almost a stubbornness at perfection.


Sorry if I sound too straight forward but I'm struggling to see how one can't see the difference.
I'm struggling to see how one can't see the similarities.

Many with AS have a very detailed long term memory and people with ADHD often struggle with both short term and long term memory. Some might have an ok memory but not to the extent someone with just AS has a good long term memory.
According to Dr Barkley, people with ADHD have an impaired working/short term memory. But their long term memory works fine, like people with AS.

People with AS will have intense interests. They could spend days or months or even years on it. They lose sleep and forget to eat or even at times lose touch with the outside world because they are spending too much time on their special interests. Then there are some that only want to talk about their interests and some that can only think about their special interests.
People with ADHD have hyperfocus. They can spend all their time focusing on their interest, and forget to do important things. Similar to people with AS.

[quoteAS is about poor social skills, a lack of theory of mind, some sensory issues and poor motor skills. The more younger you are the more noticeable the symptoms are but if you're an adult and grew out of some of theses traits then it will be harder to diagnose.[/QUOTE]
People with ADHD can have social difficulties as well. People with ADHD also grow out of the more noticeable symptoms, such as hyperactivity (actually it becomes internalized).

I supposed what it boils down to is that, humans have invented these nice neat labels for certain clusters of symptoms. In reality, however, the brain dysfunction causing these symptoms isn't nearly so neat and tidy. Disorders can and do overlap, and if the same brain areas are underdeveloped, causing the same symptoms, and if the same treatment works, then who cares what it's called. As or ADHD, it seems silly to say you cant have both. Of course, the reason I'm concerned is because I won't get treatment if I just have AS. I need a diagnosis of ADHD before my doctor will prescribe meds.

fracturedstory
03-02-11, 07:44 PM
I know there are similarities but I can pick out the differences too. An ADHD obsession vs. AS is not as intense. I barely know what people here are into but anyone who meets me will know at least 3 things that I'm into because I don't shut up about them.

AS social difficulties are far worse than ADHD and just having AS doesn't impair concentration as much as it does ADHD.

Anyway, I'm done. Figure it out for yourselves.

Fortune
03-02-11, 08:27 PM
I think the differences are easy to pick out once you know what to look for, which was something I should have said in my previous post.

Being as I thought ADHD explained my AS symptoms I can see why someone might think AS explains his or her ADHD symptoms. In retrospect, it's pretty obvious how wrong I was, though.

michele223
03-03-11, 02:46 PM
How are you all treating ADHD with Aspergers? My son is 9 and has not responded to any stimulant well. Now he is on Intuniv 3 mg and it helps but the impulse is still great. 4 mg made him sleep all day. So we are stuck with impulse. Any suggestions? He has been on Strattera but got stomach issues and concerta and had no improvements. His ADHD is severe. He also has compulsions a some tics.

daveddd
03-03-11, 05:01 PM
How are you all treating ADHD with Aspergers? My son is 9 and has not responded to any stimulant well. Now he is on Intuniv 3 mg and it helps but the impulse is still great. 4 mg made him sleep all day. So we are stuck with impulse. Any suggestions? He has been on Strattera but got stomach issues and concerta and had no improvements. His ADHD is severe. He also has compulsions a some tics.

impulsiveness?

a hand full of parents with autistic children on here or autistic themselves, use risperdone for it


i believe prozac and abilify are also used for that in autisitc children

daveddd
03-03-11, 05:03 PM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21034789


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20929907



risperdone in autism children

Spikey 723
03-04-11, 12:40 PM
impulsiveness?

a hand full of parents with autistic children on here or autistic themselves, use risperdone for it




I'm happily on risperidone, however in the paperwork from the aspergers assessment clinic it advises a med review.

They say since it's not licensed for either adhd or aspergers the treating docs should consider stopping it.

I've found it very helpful though.

tudorose
03-05-11, 08:04 AM
I used risperdal briefly (part of PTSD treatment). It was horrible for me and raised my blood sugar level so much that I felt thirsty all the time and I couldn't leave the house coz I keep needing to pee.

My HFA / ADHD son is on toffranil and dex.

I'm not an aspie though. I share some of the difficulties (like meltdowns) but have way too much theory of mind and I behave too much like an ADHD maniac.

fracturedstory
03-06-11, 05:46 AM
How are you all treating ADHD with Aspergers? My son is 9 and has not responded to any stimulant well. Now he is on Intuniv 3 mg and it helps but the impulse is still great. 4 mg made him sleep all day. So we are stuck with impulse. Any suggestions? He has been on Strattera but got stomach issues and concerta and had no improvements. His ADHD is severe. He also has compulsions a some tics.
Ritalin has actually made me more impulsive. Other than that it works fine, except I have to be the lowest possible dose otherwise I'll have complications.

Spikey 723
03-07-11, 11:46 AM
Medication seems to be very individual, what works for one person ...

There can be a lot of trial and error in finding the right, or best, result.

Spikey 723
03-21-11, 12:53 PM
I'm happily on risperidone, however in the paperwork from the aspergers assessment clinic it advises a med review.

They say since it's not licensed for either adhd or aspergers the treating docs should consider stopping it.

I've found it very helpful though.

Had appointment with adult adhd clinic today. Dr there had no problem with me being on risperidone, so I'm continuing to be on it.

Jr1985
03-22-11, 11:13 AM
Had appointment with adult adhd clinic today. Dr there had no problem with me being on risperidone, so I'm continuing to be on it.
In what way does risperidone help you?

It's strange that you find an antipsychotic helpful. It's a dopamine antagonist, so it blocks dopamine, yet ADHD is supposedly caused by a lack of dopamine. So in theory it should make it worse. Of course, maybe blocking dopamine up regulates the receptors, ultimately making the dopaminergic neurons more responsive to dopamine...

Spikey 723
03-23-11, 06:42 AM
In what way does risperidone help you?

It's strange that you find an antipsychotic helpful. It's a dopamine antagonist, so it blocks dopamine, yet ADHD is supposedly caused by a lack of dopamine. So in theory it should make it worse. Of course, maybe blocking dopamine up regulates the receptors, ultimately making the dopaminergic neurons more responsive to dopamine...

Yeah. I'm not very good with the science - but I get the general idea.

The risperidone helps with my impulsivity. Instead of me reacting to situations automatically, like with 'instinct', it lets me have time to think. I have far fewer occasions where I react badly straight away.

My family noticed when I started taking it, I was a lot less 'argumentative', and able to let things go, whereas before I'd have to have the last word.

I'm only on a low dose, and have since started ritalin - which really helps my concentration, but I don't have a clue how to explain WHY it works!