View Full Version : Do you believe in the power of the subconscious mind? And in miracles?


MissVnus
11-25-10, 08:58 PM
Has anything ever happened to you to make you believe? If not how desperately do you want it to be true?

nova2012
11-25-10, 09:06 PM
The best and most obvious manifestation of the subconscious is in dreams, although they're of ambiguous and questionable meaning. I do believe some dreams have some sort of meaning; whether or not it's decipherable by the dreamer is another story. Others seem to come out of left field and likely signify nothing, mostly the limbic system firing during REM sleep (some dreaming occurs during NREM sleep but less and probably less meaningfully). The frontal lobe mostly deactivates during dreaming, which explains the apparently illogical and non-literal situations in our dreams.

Our consciousness is only the outermost layer of the onion and we're not even aware of many of our underlying motivations, reactions to experiences, or reasons for behaving the ways in which we do; we simply believe we are. The idea of the consciousness itself is simply neurons firing in a certain way to create the illusion of awareness and volition. But there must be underlying levels of consciousness of which we aren't aware, just we don't control the rest of our body; our brain does. It is an interesting topic (and one with endless opportunities for discussion, but it's dessert time), and I'm not sure anyone can really define the "subconscious," other than to say that it certainly exists and is whatever we aren't acutely aware of when "conscious."

avjgirsijdhtjhs
11-25-10, 09:27 PM
I've experienced symptoms of autonomic nervous system hyperactivity from alcohol withdrawal before. So yes, I am a believer! :eek:

Syndrox
11-25-10, 09:36 PM
The powers of the subconscious mind are wicked. Learn how to Lucid Dream and then go flying! Best time of your life 100% :D Also I believe in miracles not like because of something specific but just because I am alive, and consider myself- an unexpected event attributed to divine intervention. :P

nova2012
11-25-10, 09:41 PM
I've experienced symptoms of autonomic nervous system hyperactivity from alcohol withdrawal before. So yes, I am a believer! :eek:

Another good example that I neglected: psychiatric disorders that we did not create, nor that we can control. Psychosis is the most extreme but even ADHD, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, panic disorder, these are all extremes of normal human experience--the most basic criteria determining "disorder" being out of one's "control." For example, many people go through mood swings due to life events; sometimes these are more problematic than at other times: they might lead to a relationship break-up or some nasty words, maybe even a violent fight after which the person vows to learn to "control himself" or remedy his behavior through therapy or anger management classes. With bipolar disorder or intermittent explosive disorder (often comorbid with each other) or borderline personality disorder, however, some have a hair-trigger temper that easily turns into a full-blown rage where the person seems to "lose" control of him or herself (I quote the word because it's questionable what control we actually have in the first place, but that's another topic for another thread). Anxiety disorders are similarly worry and situational anxiety taken to extremes, often manifesting as trait-level anxiety that someone simply cannot control, that is disproportional to the situation, and that impairs one's quality of life.

Sexual orientation and some seemingly intrinsic preferences (food/food textures, music, color, learning styles, thinking styles and patterns, traits like extroversion and introversion etc.) seem almost entirely genetic and neurobiological (and thus, at some level, subconscious), with our consciousness being only aware of their manifestation and not their development or basis.

AbsentMindProf
11-25-10, 10:44 PM
I definitely believe in a subconscious mind -- many of our well-learned behaviors are handled largely without conscious awareness. A classic example would be driving a car -- when you first start learning you have to consciously think about every single step. After many years, however, you can literally drive to work without consciously thinking about any of the individual steps. I don't believe that subconscious mind is anything mystical or magical though. I think it's just that conscious thought requires short-term memory, which has a very limited capacity. Handling many processes without involving consciousness is basically a way to permit us to multitask. Conscious awareness has a very low bandwidth.

I do believe that dreams relate to our waking thoughts, desires, and beliefs but not in any way that would be tell another person something he or she didn't already know. I tend to think that dreams mostly involve thoughts and ideas from recent conscious experience -- combined in weird, mostly random ways.

shysmile
11-26-10, 01:01 AM
Yes, I have experienced it for myself too. I can honestly say I was never smarter than the week I learned to not think so hard about things to figure out how to accomplish something. An unmedicated ADDer nonetheless!

Take ice skating for example (for those who have ever been), the second you look down at your feet while skating you start to feel unsteady, because looking at your feet causes you to think too hard, but when you look forward and "feel" how to skate instead it's SO MUCH EASIER.

I'll add that since that awesome month I realized this, I began seeing all kinds of odd connections all around me in everyday life confirming this new outlook. So many more things make sense and every day still more confusion gaps are being filled one by one. :) Less things seem impossible.

ronball
11-26-10, 09:05 AM
****in magnets! how do they work?

lordshade55
11-26-10, 02:06 PM
Another good example that I neglected: psychiatric disorders that we did not create, nor that we can control. Psychosis is the most extreme but even ADHD, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, panic disorder, these are all extremes of normal human experience--the most basic criteria determining "disorder" being out of one's "control." For example, many people go through mood swings due to life events; sometimes these are more problematic than at other times: they might lead to a relationship break-up or some nasty words, maybe even a violent fight after which the person vows to learn to "control himself" or remedy his behavior through therapy or anger management classes. With bipolar disorder or intermittent explosive disorder (often comorbid with each other) or borderline personality disorder, however, some have a hair-trigger temper that easily turns into a full-blown rage where the person seems to "lose" control of him or herself (I quote the word because it's questionable what control we actually have in the first place, but that's another topic for another thread). Anxiety disorders are similarly worry and situational anxiety taken to extremes, often manifesting as trait-level anxiety that someone simply cannot control, that is disproportional to the situation, and that impairs one's quality of life.

Sexual orientation and some seemingly intrinsic preferences (food/food textures, music, color, learning styles, thinking styles and patterns, traits like extroversion and introversion etc.) seem almost entirely genetic and neurobiological (and thus, at some level, subconscious), with our consciousness being only aware of their manifestation and not their development or basis.


Do you believe it can change, if a person wants to ( free will ) but he must do so though the correct pattern ( logica )?

Always question this question which cannot be answered since it's too complex. If it would IQ would be constant in a way.

I always questioned, average people, average IQ. is it average because they are born average or behave average and just do not care? There are so many people who do not care for learning or knowledge. Very routine behaved lifes and i think that is a reason why those do not develope as much as people who have a more hunger sort of aproach to learning.

With my limited knowledge of this, still i just feel that the concept of IQ and genetics is not all what there is to it. There is something more. It's dynamic and i do not believe a person who has been born impulsive cannot get it under control. The same for taste etc. Ofc. genetics play a role but what i mean is that it's more for the basic programming codes and that new patterns may find a way in your brain etc. etc. etc. ( Bit short on it because i have to go)

avjgirsijdhtjhs
11-26-10, 08:09 PM
With my limited knowledge of this, still i just feel that the concept of IQ and genetics is not all what there is to it. There is something more. It's dynamic and i do not believe a person who has been born impulsive cannot get it under control. The same for taste etc. Ofc. genetics play a role but what i mean is that it's more for the basic programming codes and that new patterns may find a way in your brain etc. etc. etc. ( Bit short on it because i have to go)

Russell Barkley has a few things to say about self control in this video, which is simply the first 2:32 of a CADDAC.ca (http://www.caddac.ca/cms/video/player.html) video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YS9rj5UbDwY

http://img703.imageshack.us/img703/4888/russellbarkleyselfcontr.png

illforgotten
11-26-10, 08:53 PM
The subconscious is incredibly powerful, and I think that's especially true for those with ADD. If you can train your mind to relax and not focus on doubts or negative thoughts, you'll find that you already possess incredible mental and physical capabilities. Reading faster, running longer, picking up new information from dialogue or textbooks...These are all things you can turn over to your subconscious.

Mignon
11-26-10, 10:19 PM
Do you believe in the power of the subconscious mind? And in miracles?

Consider that brain waves are Things that can and do effect our environment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6RCACuNEbY

Trooper Keith
11-26-10, 11:37 PM
****in magnets! how do they work?

Best post in this thread.

Also, no and no.

ginniebean
11-27-10, 12:12 AM
No, I don't believe in the power of the subconscious mind. Have you any idea how many really nasty things people have subconsciously? if that pandoras box was opened.. yikers.


And for goodness sakes, NO ADHD can't be cured or mitigated by grooving on your vibe.. puh leese..

Bikie
11-27-10, 08:49 AM
Russell Barkley has a few things to say about self control in this video]

Thank you very much for this link http://www.caddac.ca/cms/video/player.html

meadd823
11-27-10, 09:15 AM
I do not have a clue what this thread has to do with spiritual paths / practices with regards to how this aspect of my life is effected by my ADHD nor does it seem to describe how a spiritual practice or path is used to help any one deal with ADD. I am always open to enlightenment if I have missed the intended point.

This is not the debate section, it is not the place to argue whether or not subconscious or miracles exist.

This section is about how spiritual practice/path interacts with your ADD as a mean of support and exchange of ideas as described here (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=34038).

Kunga Dorji
12-12-10, 06:55 AM
The scripts running in our subconscious mind are critical. Unless we become aware of them they sabotage our attempts to change.

Most of our mental activity is subconscious.

A simple example is the issue of physical sensation perception. Prior to meditation I was rarely aware of any routine physical sensation when my body was at rest. An 8 week intensive training course of Mindfulness integrated CBT changed all that.

i find myself immersed in subtle pleasant sensation pretty much continuously nowadays. It was all there but was subconscious. As an objective measure- 2 point discrimination on my back has decreased from 10cm to 4cm.

One of the biggest changes this has produced is in reducing my emotional impulsiveness- making life much easier.

it is possible to bring the subconscious to light and to overwrite old patterns. The slow way of doing this is traditional psychotherapy. The faster ways involve meditation or hypnosis.

As for miracles- it depends what you mean. I think that very rational explanations will be found for most things that people call miraculous.

I do think it a miracle of sorts that our marriage is thriving and full of love after all the trauma of the undiagnosed ADHD.

tipoo
12-12-10, 11:29 AM
I think the subconscious mind is incredibly powerful, but has nothing to do with miracles or magic or whatever. I think its all about information processing. Like when you walk into a room and everyone appears to be talking normally, but instinctively you know that they were talking about you or at least a subject that they don't want you to hear about. This isn't telepathy, rather I think your brain picked up on the subtle pattern of voices before you were in the room and knew the subject matter was switched when you walked in, but the information processed wasn't vivid enough to make it into your conscious mind.

Kunga Dorji
12-13-10, 06:12 AM
I think the subconscious mind is incredibly powerful, but has nothing to do with miracles or magic or whatever. I think its all about information processing. Like when you walk into a room and everyone appears to be talking normally, but instinctively you know that they were talking about you or at least a subject that they don't want you to hear about. This isn't telepathy, rather I think your brain picked up on the subtle pattern of voices before you were in the room and knew the subject matter was switched when you walked in, but the information processed wasn't vivid enough to make it into your conscious mind.


Equally, sometimes the information we pick up subconsciously is something we are consciously trying to avoid, or have been educated to think of as a forbidden thought. It is important to expose those locked rooms in our mind to the light of day, if we wish to be genuinely free.