View Full Version : Inattentive ADHD or Lazy hypochondriac?


s3b4z
12-05-10, 02:36 AM
Dear forum-ers,
I write because I've suspected having ADD for a while. I often dismissed the idea by reassuring myself that I’m just really lazy. People have always told me that I’m one of the smartest people they know, but they are shocked when they find out my grades are average at best. My laziness with schoolwork is definitely the cause of my below stellar grades; I am incapable of checking my work and I often forget to complete assignments. On the other hand, I am familiar with the concept of self-justification; and I can’t refute the argument that this whole ADD thing might be an excuse to protect my ego.

I've spent allot of time researching. Reading peoples stories in online forums, I’ve learned that my story is not uncommon. There are many people out there, whose situation is remarkably similar to mine, with these same suspicions. Unable to stay focused, constantly making careless mistakes, distracted by everything, forgetful, disorganized; it seems that I can relate to each of the symptoms listed.

A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with a friend about ADD; and he said something I didn’t expect. He told me that if I wanted, he could get me some Adderall. I was unsure of what to do; I’d read about the drug online, but only enough to know it existed. I told him that I wasn’t interested, but if I ever was, I’d give him a call. As I learned more about it, I became more tempted to try it; but I decided that without a diagnosis, taking it would be stupid. I don’t have a clue what the proper dosage is; I don’t even know if I have ADD. This is what has motivated me to see a doctor.

So, what should I do? Knowing my parents, they’d tell me I’m just lazy. I don’t have insurance so any doctors visit would be out of pocket. And even if I go, I doubt the diagnosis would be a one-visit thing. Anyone out there know how this works? Would a psychiatrist be able to answer me in one visit? Two? Or is it a continuing thing, like a few times a month?

In search of advice
-sebaz

Corinna
12-05-10, 02:40 PM
Hi Sebaz,

how old are you?

Your parents should allow you to get checked out if you explain to them your suspicions - mavbe you need to be a bit persistant.

I would like to know: what exactly happens in your mind when you say 'I am unable to check my work'. Do you not feel like it? Do you get annoyed? Do you get tired?

Please do not try to take precription drugs. That's insanity. Try coffee instead. It has the same effect than a low dose of ritalin.

Djo77
12-21-10, 08:21 PM
Hi Sebaz,

Please do not try to take precription drugs. That's insanity. Try coffee instead. It has the same effect than a low dose of ritalin.

Coffee has in now way the same effect as ritalin...
Anyhow, have you looked at other possible causes such as Dysthimia?
I know how you feel, I was constantly like nah I'm just lazy, next day yeah it fits me perfectly! And that cycle repeating for about 2 months... It's not really worth it. Search a lot of information about innatentive ADD. There is a good thread on this site somehting like innatnetive add a community effort or something.
You have to keep pushing your parents to get your diagnosed, don't just try once and then forget, your symptoms are not going to leave. This is the best advice I can give you. Good luck.

Jester
12-26-10, 09:38 PM
Medication like dexedrine raises your level of well being in all situations. If you don't like doing something. For example if you HATE school, when you take dexedrine, school starts to seem feasible and tolerable.

Another example is going with your parents to watch a musical on Broadway. God damn you HATE doing that, you would rather kill yourself then to watch a musical but when you take dexedrine, doing that is Ok and can even be fun at times.

ADD medication is for ADDers ofc but also for lazy people, people who lack energy, in one word, for under stimulated people. That's why there's no test to detect ADD. Because ADD stands for stuff that a doctor can't put on a treatment sheet to prescribe you meds. Like:

Condition treated: Lazyness
Medication: Dexedrine 25mg ER
Dosage: 20mg in the morning

Instead it says:

Condition treated: ADD
Medication: Dexedrine 25mg ER
Dosage: 20mg in the morning

Because how do you define lazyness? Someone who doesn't want to work, but why? Why doesn't that person want to work? Because he's lazy, but why is he lazy? Because he doesn't want to work, But why doesn't he want to work? Because he's lazy.

It's a logic loop. Logic loops are only created when idiotic people provide idiotic answers in absence of explanation. The word ''lazy'' was invented by such idiotic people.

ginniebean
12-26-10, 10:36 PM
Medication like dexedrine raises your level of well being in all situations. If you don't like doing something. For example if you HATE school, when you take dexedrine, school starts to seem feasible and tolerable.


I don't have this experience so it's clearly not universal to everyone with adhd. I enjoyed school, in fact I loved it, I still love learning, the problem for me was the required day in day out diligence, the amount of anxiety I had over whether I could sustain my efforts.





ADD medication is for ADDers ofc but also for lazy people, people who lack energy, in one word, for under stimulated people. That's why there's no test to detect ADD. Because ADD stands for stuff that a doctor can't put on a treatment sheet to prescribe you meds. Like:

Condition treated: Lazyness
Medication: Dexedrine 25mg ER
Dosage: 20mg in the morning

Instead it says:

Condition treated: ADD
Medication: Dexedrine 25mg ER
Dosage: 20mg in the morning


Is it yourself you have such a low opinion of? There's not a person in the world that would actually call me lazy, I don't look lazy and I tend towards work-a-holism. Not all people with adhd are hypo-active and even they aren't hypo-active all the time,


There's a lot more to adhd than simply how much energy you have or whether you're perceived as lazy or not. There definitely are criteria for a diagnosis that is not nearly as hazy or haphazard as you make out.

Because how do you define lazyness? Someone who doesn't want to work, but why? Why doesn't that person want to work? Because he's lazy, but why is he lazy? Because he doesn't want to work, But why doesn't he want to work? Because he's lazy.

It's a logic loop. Logic loops are only created when idiotic people provide idiotic answers in absence of explanation. The word ''lazy'' was invented by such idiotic people.


There's many who do want to work and I suspect the majority but keep getting fired over impulsive issues or inability to sense the passage of time.


Simple answers rarely cover much territory.

Jester
12-27-10, 12:58 AM
I don't have this experience so it's clearly not universal to everyone with adhd. I enjoyed school, in fact I loved it, I still love learning, the problem for me was the required day in day out diligence, the amount of anxiety I had over whether I could sustain my efforts.








Is it yourself you have such a low opinion of? There's not a person in the world that would actually call me lazy, I don't look lazy and I tend towards work-a-holism. Not all people with adhd are hypo-active and even they aren't hypo-active all the time,


There's a lot more to adhd than simply how much energy you have or whether you're perceived as lazy or not. There definitely are criteria for a diagnosis that is not nearly as hazy or haphazard as you make out.




There's many who do want to work and I suspect the majority but keep getting fired over impulsive issues or inability to sense the passage of time.


Simple answers rarely cover much territory.

What I meant is stimulants don't only help people with ADD ADHD but also many other people so what I said was, if you don't have ADD/ADHD don't necessarily discard stimulants, they could prove useful.

Imnapl
12-27-10, 03:22 AM
What I meant is stimulants don't only help people with ADD ADHD but also many other people so what I said was, if you don't have ADD/ADHD don't necessarily discard stimulants, they could prove useful.But people without ADHD don't have the same reaction to stimulant medication as people with ADHD do.

Djo77
12-27-10, 03:29 AM
Do you have a list of symptoms that occur with ADD vs non ADD people then.
And I don't mean a couple of words I mean somewhat more in detail so that it isn't that vague I have yet to encounter such a list.

mctavish23
12-27-10, 11:19 PM
If "coffee" were the damn answer, then no one would need meds.

ADHD is THE most widely researched childhoold disorder/developmental disability on

earth.

Before reaching downward for the lowest common denominator/black & white/"knee jerk"

reaction of "laziness," which you misspelled btw, try reading ANY of those data;especially

some on molecular genetics.

This is an ongoing science, but it damn sure IS NOT laziness.

You could even start with the first "real" self-help book from 1994, "You Mean I'm Not

Lazy, Stupid Or Crazy?" by Kate Kelley & Peg Ramundo.

Happy Holidays.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

ginniebean
12-28-10, 02:59 AM
What I meant is stimulants don't only help people with ADD ADHD but also many other people so what I said was, if you don't have ADD/ADHD don't necessarily discard stimulants, they could prove useful.


Jester,

I went back and read your post again and you did not communicate this clearly. It very much looks like you were suggesting that ADHD and laziness are synonymous. I'm glad you corrected that and I'm having trouble figuring out why someone without adhd would be prescribed stimulants for 'laziness'?

Djo77
12-28-10, 08:40 AM
But people without ADHD don't have the same reaction to stimulant medication as people with ADHD do.

Do you have a list of symptoms that occur with ADD vs non ADD people then.

And I don't mean a couple of words I mean somewhat more in detail so that it isn't that vague I have yet to encounter such a list.

I meant please answer:p

Unbelievable
12-28-10, 12:44 PM
Here's a list of symptoms I put together. Follow the links for additional information.

I was able to get a diagnosis with one visit to a psychiatrist. She wrote a letter to my MD to confirm and he will handle medication. (He had stated that he is comfortable doing so. Some doctors may not be.)

The psych still does recommend that I get testing, but I'm not willing to spend the money right now.

If you're going to school you may be able to get help at a reduced cost through your student health center.

***

From here:

http://www.help4adhd.org/en/treatment/guides/WWK9

Some common symptoms and problems of living with AD/HD include:
Poor attention; excessive distractibility
Physical restlessness or hyperactivity
Excessive impulsivity; saying or doing things without thinking
Excessive and chronic procrastination
Difficulty getting started on tasks
Difficulty completing tasks
Frequently losing things
Poor organization, planning, and time management skills
Excessive forgetfulness

Not every person with AD/HD displays all of the symptoms, nor does every person with AD/HD experience the symptoms of AD/HD to the same level of severity or impairment. Some people have mild AD/HD, while others have severe AD/HD, resulting in significant impairments. AD/HD can cause problems in school, in jobs and careers, at home, in family and other relationships, and with tasks of daily living.

*****

Symptoms of Inattention



Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort
Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities
Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
Is often forgetful in daily activities


Symptoms of Hyperactivity



Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)
Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"
Often talks excessively


Symptoms of Impulsivity



Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
Often has difficulty awaiting turn
Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)


A diagnosis of AD/HD is determined by the clinician based on the number and severity of symptoms, the duration of symptoms, and the degree to which these symptoms cause impairment in various life domains (e.g. school, work, home). It is possible to meet diagnostic criteria for AD/HD without any symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity. The clinician must further determine if these symptoms are caused by other conditions, or are influenced by co-existing conditions.

It is important to note that the presence of significant impairment in at least two major settings of the person's life is central to the diagnosis of AD/HD. Impairment refers to how AD/HD interferes with an individual's life. Examples of impairment include losing a job because of AD/HD symptoms, experiencing excessive conflict and distress in a marriage, getting into financial trouble because of impulsive spending or failure to pay bills in a timely manner, or getting on academic probation in college due to failing grades. If the individual manifests a number of AD/HD symptoms but does not manifest significant impairment, s/he may not meet the criteria for AD/HD as a clinical disorder.

The DSM-IV TR specifies three major subtypes of AD/HD:



Primarily Inattentive Subtype. The individual mainly has difficulties with attention, organization, and follow-through.
Primarily Hyperactive/Impulsive. The individual mainly has difficulties with impulse control, restlessness, and self-control.
Combined Subtype. The individual has symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and restlessness.


****

About Adult ADHD: Take This Self-Test

To learn more about adult ADHD and your symptoms, check each of the following statements that apply to you...

1. I have difficulty getting organized.

2. When given a task, I usually procrastinate rather than doing it right away.

3. I work on a lot of projects, but can't seem to complete most of them.

4. I tend to make decisions and act on them impulsively- like spending money, getting sexually involved with someone, diving into new activities, and changing plans.

5. I get bored easily.

6. No matter how much I do or how hard I try, I just can't seem to reach my goals.

7. I often get distracted when people are talking; I just tune out or drift off.

8. I get so wrapped up in some things I do that I can hardly stop to take a break or switch to doing something else.

9. I tend to overdo things even when they're not good for me -- like compulsive shopping, drinking too much, overworking, and overeating.

10. I get frustrated easily and I get impatient when things are going too slowly.

11. My self-esteem is not as high as that of others I know.

12. I need a lot of stimulation from things like action movies and video games, new purchases, being among lively friends, driving fast or engaging in extreme sports.

13. I tend to say or do things without thinking, and sometimes that gets me into trouble.

14. I'd rather do things my own way than follow the rules and procedures of others.

15. I often find myself tapping a pencil, swinging my leg, or doing something else to work off nervous energy.

16. I can feel suddenly depressed when I'm separated from people, projects or things that I like to be involved with.

17. I see myself differently than others see me, and when someone gets angry with me for doing something that upset them I'm often very surprised.

18. Even though I worry a lot about dangerous things that are unlikely to happen to me, I tend to be careless and accident prone.

19. Even though I have a lot of fears, people would describe me as a risk taker.

20. I make a lot of careless mistakes.

21. I have blood relatives who suffer from ADD, depression, bipolar disorder, or substance abuse.

*******

ADHD Predominantly Inattentive Type (WWK8)

http://www.help4adhd.org/about/what/WWK8

Inattention Symptoms

In the DSM-IV, the diagnostic manual of the American Psychiatric Association, there is a list of nine symptoms of "inattention" problems. Almost everybody has some difficulty with some of these sometimes. Persons who qualify for a diagnosis of ADHD have at least six of these nine symptoms and suffer significant impairment as a result. This means that daily functioning in two or more of the following areas is significantly disrupted: school, work, family or social interaction.



Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)
Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)
Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
Is often forgetful in daily activities


Because the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria were originally designed for children, the following questions have been developed from those criteria by the World Health Organization3 to ask adults about whether they suffer from ADHD inattention symptoms:

1. Do you often make careless mistakes when you have to work on a boring and difficult project?

2. Do you often have difficulty keeping your attention when you are doing boring or repetitive work?

3. Do you often have difficulty concentrating on what people say to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?

4. Do you often have trouble wrapping up the final details of a project, once the challenging parts have been done?

5. Do you often have difficulty getting things in order when you have to do a task that requires organization?

6. When you have a task that requires a lot of thought, do you often avoid or delay getting started?

7. Do you often misplace or have difficulty finding things at home or at work?

8. Are you often distracted by activity or noise around you?

9. Do you often have problems remembering appointments or obligations?

Individuals who have significant chronic impairment from six or more of these symptoms are likely to have ADHD if they also meet certain other criteria for diagnosis that are specified in the DSM-IV.

Doesn't everybody have problems with these inattention symptoms sometimes?

Yes, these symptoms of inattention are characteristic of everyone sometimes. Only persons who have significant impairment most of the time from these symptoms warrant a diagnosis of ADHD. If someone currently has significant impairment from at least six of these inattention symptoms and little or no hyperactive or impulsive symptoms of ADHD, they are likely to qualify for diagnosis as having ADHD, predominantly inattentive type. An individual can have little or no impairment from any hyperactive or impulsive symptoms and still fully meet DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for ADHD.4

Are the inattention symptoms of ADHD constant? Are these persons inattentive in everything they do?

No, though the inattention symptoms must be chronically impairing for a diagnosis of ADHD, this does not mean that they are constant in everything the person does. Everyone with ADHD has a few types of activity in which they are able to function quite well without much trouble from their usual inattention symptoms. They might be able to concentrate very well when playing a favorite sport or video game. They might be good at maintaining focus for a long time when watching TV shows they like, doing art or building Lego models.

When asked why they can pay attention so well for these favored activities and not for other important activities, such as school or work, they often explain that they can pay attention easily on activities that are interesting to them, but cannot make themselves pay attention to tasks that do not really interest them, even when they know it is important. This makes it look like ADHD is a willpower problem, but that is not the case.4

Can a person be smart and still have ADHD?

Yes, ADHD has nothing to do with how smart a person is. Some individuals with ADHD have very high IQ scores, others score in the average range, and others score much lower. Often individuals with ADHD who are very bright are not recognized as being impaired with ADHD symptoms. Teachers and parents and clinicians often think they are just being lazy or unmotivated or bored.

Imnapl
12-28-10, 01:47 PM
Do you have a list of symptoms that occur with ADD vs non ADD people then.

And I don't mean a couple of words I mean somewhat more in detail so that it isn't that vague I have yet to encounter such a list.

I meant please answer:pSymptoms of what? Symptoms of how stimulant medication affects different people? In my experience, from observing children in school, it is a matter of degree.

daveddd
12-28-10, 02:08 PM
i personally know 2 people who were prescribed stims for motivational reasons , and no adhd dx

Imnapl
12-28-10, 02:11 PM
i personally know 2 people who were prescribed stims for motivational reasons , and no adhd dxDid they motivate? I wish. On the other hand, the last time I paid a visit to my local emergency ward, after telling the nurse the medications I was on, I was asked if I had narcolepsy.

daveddd
12-28-10, 02:13 PM
not positive but they still get them


my sister also has them for chronic bipolar depression

mctavish23
12-29-10, 10:31 PM
There's an empirically (research) supported "One Way Comorbidity" between

Bipolar Disorder & ADHD ( i.e.,over 90% of children/adolescents with (authentic)

Early Onset (Pediatric) Bipolar Disorder also have ADHD, while the opposite

isn't true). Geller,B.(2002) & (2003).

The reasons for the scripts are more on the docs that write them.

That has nothing to do with the approx. 20K studies supporting the validity

of ADHD.

Happy Holidays

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Djo77
12-31-10, 01:47 AM
Symptoms of what? Symptoms of how stimulant medication affects different people? In my experience, from observing children in school, it is a matter of degree.
Effects of medication.

Imnapl
12-31-10, 02:27 AM
Effects of medication.As the psychiatrist who assessed me for ADHD said, everyone can benefit from a stimulant, but people with ADHD really notice a difference.

Stimulant medication is given off-label to people with other disorders other than narcolepsy or ADHD. If you spend time with them, you can tell when they forget to take their medication or their medication has worn off, but they do not get the full effect that one can observe in someone with ADHD. I work with kids and I have had lots of time to observe their behaviour on and off medication.

As I said earlier, it's all a matter of degree. On another note, I have been doing a trial of different medications to treat inflammatory arthritis. Some have been of no help whatsoever, other than making me ill, and others work at first and then stop working. I am currently on one that we are slowly increasing the dose. My doctor was tempted to just try another new one, but we both decided that because I was getting some benefit from the medication without side effects, that we should stay with it, but keep adjusting the dose, hoping for full effect.

My understanding is that that's the goal here, to get full effect from a medication. Sometimes people have to be satisfied with just a partial effect, as in something is better than nothing.

daveddd
12-31-10, 11:55 AM
being around a college dorm around finals, really makes you see they can benefit everybody


maybe differently , but they do


my sister has no adhd whatsoever and they help her

Djo77
01-01-11, 12:47 AM
As the psychiatrist who assessed me for ADHD said, everyone can benefit from a stimulant, but people with ADHD really notice a difference.

Stimulant medication is given off-label to people with other disorders other than narcolepsy or ADHD. If you spend time with them, you can tell when they forget to take their medication or their medication has worn off, but they do not get the full effect that one can observe in someone with ADHD. I work with kids and I have had lots of time to observe their behaviour on and off medication.

As I said earlier, it's all a matter of degree. On another note, I have been doing a trial of different medications to treat inflammatory arthritis. Some have been of no help whatsoever, other than making me ill, and others work at first and then stop working. I am currently on one that we are slowly increasing the dose. My doctor was tempted to just try another new one, but we both decided that because I was getting some benefit from the medication without side effects, that we should stay with it, but keep adjusting the dose, hoping for full effect.

My understanding is that that's the goal here, to get full effect from a medication. Sometimes people have to be satisfied with just a partial effect, as in something is better than nothing.

I have the same. I notice an enormous distance but I dont feel my ADD is gone I feel like about just 60%. If this gets to at least 75 with good sleep ill be about satisfied about the drug.

rogerdodger91
01-02-11, 03:52 PM
Blah symptoms are for people on the outside looking in. Its easy to tell if you have an ADHD mind. And its also easy to go a long time without realizing you do until you take a stimulant like adderall. Typically, this is how ill describe the mind of someone with adhd. Your thoughts are so fast its hard to keep up with them. When you talk, you are three sentences ahead already. You never ever stop thinking. You sit there and try to go airheaded, and not think of a single thought. But then you realize that im still thinking about trying not to think. There are not moments where you sit there and go "blank". You arent losing concentration on something because you stop thinking, but because your mind is so bored that its not getting the stimulation it craves. So it moves on to something more interesting. And once your mind gets bored with that thought, it moves on to something else. You have no control over your attention. When i used to work on homework or tests, i would be reading long articles about the most boring crap. And no matter how bad i wanted to read it, how much i new that i needed to read it, i would still be reading with other thoughts going on in my head. When you are like this, its like the saying words go in one ear and out the other. You can read every single word on that page and not remember a single thing you just read. You can read it over and over, and its always the other thoughts that take over. No matter how bad you want to read about the the little blue jay that got herpes or whatever. You will never ever be able to read it even if its a life or death situation. Its not lazyness because its not voluntary. In fact its quite the opposite. We want to do these things, we set goals and then when it comes to executing we get stuck. Does that mean we cant concentrate on anything? No. We can hyperfocus. We can take our daydreaming and get lost in things our brains find pleasurable. Video games, music, and in some cases learning. If you enjoy learning, you can hyperfocus into that. But when it comes too homework, writing is not "fast" enough for us. Our thoughts do not have the patience to wait for your hands to catch up to the pace it wants to go so it goes off and does its own thing. Thats why when we make mistakes in our writing its because we are already so much further into what we want to say. Its easy to get sentences *** backwards if your in the "mode". Then you take a stimulant and the world is a much slower place. Your thoughts finally just chill and take a nice stroll in the park for once. Your able to go into alot more depth into what your thinking. Boring things that didnt once stimulate your mind are now alot more possible. I hope this helps you out.

Icecream
01-02-11, 03:55 PM
I would stay away from online stories about stars and their treatment, like Lindsay, Paris Hilton and others. It makes treatment hard.

scarygreengiant
01-02-11, 04:55 PM
being around a college dorm around finals, really makes you see they can benefit everybody


maybe differently , but they do


my sister has no adhd whatsoever and they help her

Yes I totally agree. If they didn't help non-ADHDers there wouldn't be a huge underground market for stimulants. Which is WHY I HAVE TO HIDE MY MEDS!!!!!! Sorry, I'm bitter about that. Like Imanpl said, maybe it's a matter of different degrees but they DO help both non-ADHDers and ADHDers.

itsanADHDthing
01-07-11, 03:14 PM
welcome to the world of add :)

doubt you wanna be here though..

itsanADHDthing
01-07-11, 03:17 PM
What I meant is stimulants don't only help people with ADD ADHD but also many other people so what I said was, if you don't have ADD/ADHD don't necessarily discard stimulants, they could prove useful.
I have heard that pyschiatrist once said "95% of the world would be better off on stimulants"

i realized this

than looked out dumbsh*t i mean government and now realize that 95% of the world would be better off on stimulants, it's just the other 5% (on meth) that are ruining it for the rest

Djo77
01-07-11, 06:25 PM
Blah symptoms are for people on the outside looking in. Its easy to tell if you have an ADHD mind. And its also easy to go a long time without realizing you do until you take a stimulant like adderall. Typically, this is how ill describe the mind of someone with adhd. Your thoughts are so fast its hard to keep up with them. When you talk, you are three sentences ahead already. You never ever stop thinking. You sit there and try to go airheaded, and not think of a single thought. But then you realize that im still thinking about trying not to think. There are not moments where you sit there and go "blank". You arent losing concentration on something because you stop thinking, but because your mind is so bored that its not getting the stimulation it craves. So it moves on to something more interesting. And once your mind gets bored with that thought, it moves on to something else. You have no control over your attention. When i used to work on homework or tests, i would be reading long articles about the most boring crap. And no matter how bad i wanted to read it, how much i new that i needed to read it, i would still be reading with other thoughts going on in my head. When you are like this, its like the saying words go in one ear and out the other. You can read every single word on that page and not remember a single thing you just read. You can read it over and over, and its always the other thoughts that take over. No matter how bad you want to read about the the little blue jay that got herpes or whatever. You will never ever be able to read it even if its a life or death situation. Its not lazyness because its not voluntary. In fact its quite the opposite. We want to do these things, we set goals and then when it comes to executing we get stuck. Does that mean we cant concentrate on anything? No. We can hyperfocus. We can take our daydreaming and get lost in things our brains find pleasurable. Video games, music, and in some cases learning. If you enjoy learning, you can hyperfocus into that. But when it comes too homework, writing is not "fast" enough for us. Our thoughts do not have the patience to wait for your hands to catch up to the pace it wants to go so it goes off and does its own thing. Thats why when we make mistakes in our writing its because we are already so much further into what we want to say. Its easy to get sentences *** backwards if your in the "mode". Then you take a stimulant and the world is a much slower place. Your thoughts finally just chill and take a nice stroll in the park for once. Your able to go into alot more depth into what your thinking. Boring things that didnt once stimulate your mind are now alot more possible. I hope this helps you out.

I wish they would post this on all these sites which would like to help you yourself to indicate wheter you have ADD/+H and should seek help for it. It wasn't after I read through a lot of this forum that I began to believe I really have ADD, the symptoms shown on these medical sites are far too vague as well as is the diagnosis. Dr Russels videos on AD(H)D were really useful as well.

Djo77
01-07-11, 06:44 PM
By the way I used to see myself as 'overfocused' ADD. Now I highly suspect that I have moderate-high SAD, since the two days with a sudden increase of sunlight within dark days made my mood go up by a tenfold, I then no longer felt or met the critria of overfocused but rather, innatentive hanging close to combined type, been spinning rounds much : P.