View Full Version : Oh god, I'm doing it again... [Asperger's Quiz]


Anubis578
12-05-10, 04:15 AM
I feel like one of those filthy hypochondriacs that scours the internet looking for new and interesting conditions to diagnose themselves with...

...but I'm freaking out.

In the General ADD Discussion forum, someone posted a link to an Autism Spectrum test. Average scores for NT's were around 16. Most people (from this forum) who took the test scored somewhere in the 20s. I scored 35. Now, I know that these tests are not meant for diagnosis, but damn... I retook the test a few minutes ago and I scored 34 (and realized that I had underplayed one of the questions...)

I tried to ignore it. I tried to brush it off. I had gone over, many times, the symptoms of Autism and Asperger's, making sure they didn't fit, before settling on ADHD. My brother has Asperger's, so it was the first thing I looked at, and it didn't fit... I dunno... still doesn't seem to fully fit... but at the same time... ahhhhh, self-diagnosis bias...

So I did a little more searching on the internet. Good idea, bad idea, who knows... I found another Asperger's quiz and decided to take it, trying my hardest to be honest (I always worry that I'm being dishonest, to the point where I'll retake these quizzes over and over and eventually get fed up that my answers never change...)

Aspie Quiz (http://www.rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.php)

My results scared the hell out of me.

Thank you for filling out this questionnaire.

Your Aspie score: 172 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 32 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

They gave me a picture, too, but I can't figure out what the hell it means. I don't know what to do. It took a lot of arguing to convince my mother that I may have ADHD, enough to let me fully address it with a doctor. The doctor started me on generic Ritalin, without giving me a diagnosis (more testing, thorough doc, good stuff). I feel like bringing this up will completely destroy my credibility... I feel like getting my mother to accept the possibility of me having ADHD is all the accomplishment I deserve, and that I should just accept this an move on. I'm 20 years old. If it wasn't caught by now, then it must not be a big issue, right...? God, knowing that doesn't help though...

I've never understood why someone would feel upset to find out something startling about their past. Like, if someone found out they were adopted, I never understood why it would bother them. I mean, it's not like it changes anything. They are the same person as they were before they found out. I feel that way now, like I don't have any real reason to freak out about this... but I am. I'm the same person that I was when I woke up this morning. Nothing has changed. I am the same person that I was when I woke up yesterday morning... THIS DOESN'T CHANGE ANYTHING... so why does it feel like it changes everything? I feel weak for letting this bother me when I have so callously disregarded the exact same emotional response in other people. Ignorance truly is bliss... but closure helps, right?

Someone with Asperger's, please read my symptoms and tell me that it's all in my head. I'm sure I'm just freaking myself out. Desperate for the attention, right? That's all it is... oh god...

I'm going to post Wikipedia's listed symptoms and respond to them. That should be the easiest way to do it.

Lack of demonstrated empathy
- I have worried for a while that I am Anti-Social. I have a hard time feeling empathy, and yet, I have always been very empathetic. I don't know how to explain this. A lot of times, people's emotions, especially strong negative ones that I feel demand consolation from me, only serve to aggravate me. I find myself irritated at the person for forcing me to try to empathize. But I've also found myself empathizing against my will. I always had a hard time holding grudges because I can understand a lot of pain. I hate seeing people in pain, but I rarely know what to do or say to help them. I feel like there are often two very distinct personalities: (1) the cold, callous sociopath that is frustrated by the overabundance of emotion that other people experience and (2) the overly empathetic kid with no true sense of self, who finds it easy to step into other peoples' shoes (but not their minds)

Impaired non-verbal gestures
- I have never been one to make eye-contact. I HATE making eye-contact. It is the most uncomfortable thing in the world for me. I only ever do it when I know I must use it to make a point. And, while I'm very good at reading body language, my own body language has always felt awkward and clumsy. I feel like I have to manually operate my body language, you know what I mean? If I'm not consciously changing my facial expressions/tone of voice, I end up looking blank and speaking in a monotone. I've always been one to maintain a stone-cold poker face, so to speak. It's very rare for me to express any emotion without purposefully meaning to do it. I never wear my heart on my sleeve. It makes me feel so fake. I feel like a puppeteer, controlling something that isn't truly an extension of myself. This is another thing that made me wonder about ASPD: I feel like I fake all of my social encounters, because I have to consciously use facial expressions and body language. I feel like I am doing it to manipulate the conversation, though I rarely have malicious intent, and I usually do what I can to present myself as thoughtful and caring, because I like to think that I am, just in my own way. I have emotions, I've just never been good at expressing them. It's hard, because I have so much love and compassion and I feel like it wastes away...

This is too much work. I'm just going to pick a few other ones that stand out.

Selective mutism
- I only open up to a select few people. Few people know the real me, the rest just get a facade: the image of normality, as interpreted by my crazy mind. I've learned to fake most social interaction, but I don't enjoy it. Not at all. I hate meeting new people. I hate being around large groups of people (in fact, I'm prone to panic attacks if I'm alone in a large crowd, part of the reason I've done so poorly in college: going to class is WAY TOO STRESSFUL). I was diagnosed as having social anxiety, so that could just be it. Regardless, people make me uncomfortable. I prefer spending as much time alone as possible, or in the company of a few very close friends. I've gotten much better at this, and can usually interact with new people fairly well, but it's got to be in small groups, otherwise I'm definitely going to get overwhelmed.

Reading Other People
- I am EXCELLENT at reading peoples' facial expressions and body language, but not when I'm being addressed. When observing interactions between other people, I can effortlessly pick apart every aspect of those people. I can determine motivations, hidden meanings, whether or not someone is lying, etc etc, but never when I'm being spoken to. There is too much anxiety from having to focus on what they are saying to be able to discern hidden meanings. I'm often slow to pick up on social cues. I've had a hard time understanding this. I'm a freaking god of social interaction... as long as I don't have to participate...

I have also always had problems with auditory processing. I have extremely sensitive hearing, and will often hear things that other people don't, but I have trouble understanding what I am hearing. I was always the kid saying, "what" or "huh" when spoken to. I attributed this to the ADHD, but now I am not so sure. I also often hear voices/words in sounds (auditory patterns...?)

And don't even get me started on patterns and numbers. I was a great math student as a kid, something which made my mother adamantly deny the possibility of ADHD ("You were a very bright student!"). I find numbers and patterns very comforting. In fact, if I can't find a pattern in things, it makes me very uncomfortable. Things that lacked symmetry frustrated me to no end when I was a kid. I'm always looking for symmetry, always looking for patterns, always looking for connections, always looking for the logic behind a system.

That's why I always liked math, and why I was an excellent computer science student in college (I aced the course without paying a bit of attention during the lectures. Computer syntax came naturally to me in a way that nothing else ever has) - I could always appreciate and understand the logic behind it.

One last thing: whenever I type something out (like this post, for a specific example), I go back over it and read it several times through. When I do, it never feels like something I've written. I don't know why I always re-read my posts, but it's comforting... I tell myself that I'm reading it through someone else's eyes, but I don't know if that's true. I don't really know anything for sure about myself, especially not now...

I feel drained. Please ask me questions now. I hate having to type open-ended descriptions. It's all too much.

I am so confused...

Anubis578
12-05-10, 04:16 AM
I've read my post three times through now, and I'll probably do it at least once more before I leave the thread. Every time I check for replies, I'll read my post again, at least once, maybe more.

Lunacie
12-05-10, 10:32 AM
My family sort of thought I was a hypochondriac for a long time. I knew something was different about me, something was wrong. Every time I'd read about or hear about something, I'd ask, "Do you think this might be the answer?" And they always said, "No, you don't have that."

Then I started learning about ADHD and I didn't ask them, I told them, this is what I have! And yet, from coming to places like this I knew there was still something else. And then we learned that my youngest granddaughter has Autism and I started learning about the Autism Spectrum, and in some ways Asperger's answered the questions that ADHD didn't quite answer. My granddaughter and I are so much alike that I think this has to be the rest of the story for me.

But - would getting a diagnosis change anything in my life - other than assuring me that the way I am may not be "normal" but it's typical for someone with both Autism and ADHD.

So, that's the question I think you need to ask. Would getting a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum make a difference in your life? Would it just confirm that you're typical for someone with ASD - or do you want more? Do you want accomodations at school or work? Do you want therapy to help you cope with life in a NT world?


Empathy - one of the things I've learned is that people with Autism are not Empathically Blank - they are generally more sensitive than NT folks and they feel bombarded with sensory overload and have trouble reflecting back what they're feeling. And they especially struggle to find the words to express what they're feeling. My granddaughter has had some wonderful therapy through the mental health association and is learning to express her feelings. I wish I could get that kind of help. I can reflect back and express feelings when I'm online - but face-to-face it's usually pretty overwhelming.

Non-Verbal Gestures - I've always hated looking people in the eye, and some ADHDers do seem to have more trouble with this, but it's much more common with people on the Spectrum. We also have trouble recording what a person's face looks like. I beat myself up for years because I couldn't remember people and put names with faces. Turns out that's typical for people with ASD. I've gotten better about remembering faces, but if I see someone out of their usual situation, I know the face but cannot for the life of me remember who they are or where I know them from.

Selective mutism - I thought this more than just being reticent or shy about speaking to people openly unless we're very close to them - with my granddaughter when she was little, she could go up to someone and talk to them, but if they spoke to her first she simply could not respond. And a lot of people with ADHD do the "hermit" thing, being sociable really drains us and we have to spend time alone to recharge.

Your comment on looking for symmetry really hits me. I was thinking I don't look for patterns that much ;) but - I clean a salon where there is a display of jewelry - after I take all the jewelry off the glass shelves and clean the glass, I try to make the display look casual again like it was when I started cleaning, but I have to make it have some symmetry. I just can't do it any other way. Fortunately the boss doesn't care, the woman who did the cleaning before I started would just throw it all back on the shelf without displaying it at all. :rolleyes:

xenonscreams
12-05-10, 02:00 PM
Those tests, by their very natures, aren't diagnostic. With respect to the AQ...

Although most students with Asperger syndrome or high functioning autism have average mathematical ability and test slightly worse in mathematics than in general intelligence, some are gifted in mathematics[10] and Asperger syndrome has not prevented some adults from major accomplishments such as winning the Nobel Prize.[11]
The questionnaire was trialled on Cambridge University students, and a group of sixteen winners of the British Mathematical Olympiad,[6] to determine whether there was a link between a talent for mathematical and scientific disciplines and traits associated with the autism spectrum. Mathematics, physical sciences and engineering students were found to score significantly higher, e.g. 21.8 on average for mathematicians and 21.4 for computer scientists. The average score for the British Mathematical Olympiad winners was 24. Of the students who scored 32 or more on the test, eleven agreed to be interviewed and seven of these were reported to meet the DSM-IV criteria for Asperger syndrome, although no formal diagnosis was made as they were not suffering any distress. The test was also taken by a group of subjects who had been diagnosed with autism or Asperger syndrome by a professional, the average score being 35 and 38 for males and females respectively.

I would see a professional and raise your concern if you feel like it impacts your life significantly. There's a chance you don't formally meet the diagnostic criteria and just display a lot of autistic traits, and there's also a chance you meet the diagnostic criteria and will find out something new about yourself. Finding out something about yourself is never really a bad thing.

I haven't been diagnosed with Asperger's and I don't think I'd meet the diagnostic criteria, but I'm about to try this other quiz anyways. I really do think that autistic to not autistic is a continuum, and that I fall somewhere very close to where most people draw the autism line, but not quite there.

Do you dislike when people walk behind you?

Oh my god, I had no idea this bothered anybody else.

This is about what I expected I guess:

Your Aspie score: 108 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 87 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

Anubis578
12-05-10, 02:57 PM
Thank you guys for your responses. I'm not sure why I was freaking out last night. I think I was just tired and felt a little bit overwhelmed. I thought I had solved the puzzle with ADHD.

More than anything else, I need the closure of knowing. I've never been one to be able to just let things go. I cannot stand not knowing, and that holds especially true when it comes to things of my mind.

Clearly, if I do have Asperger's, it is not having a serious impact on my life. I certainly don't want any special accommodations. That would just make me feel uncomfortable. As long as treating the ADHD helps me make it through college and find a career, I'm alright with dealing with the rest on my own. Again, it hasn't had a serious negative impact on the way that I function, it just explains a bit more about why I am the way I am. I guess that is why I freaked out last night. As human beings, we all want to feel like we are in control of ourselves. Finding out that certain parts of my personality are the result of a disorder is rather discomforting. I feel less like "me," you know?

I went through the Aspie-Quiz again, and copied a few of the questions that seemed particularly relevant:

- Do you find it hard to tell the age of people? [2]
- Do you have poor awareness or body control and a tendency to fall, stumble or bump into things? [2]
- Have others commented or have you observed yourself that you make unusual facial expressions? [2]
- Do you bite your lip, cheek or tongue (e.g. when thinking, when anxious or nervous)? [2]
- Do you have a good sense of how much pressure to apply when doing things with your hands? [0]
- Do you have trouble reading clocks? [2]
- Do you mistake noises for voices? [2]
- Do you dislike when people walk behind you? [2]
- Do you have difficulties judging distances, height, depth or speed? [2]
- Do you stutter when stressed? [2]
- Are you impatient and have low frustration tolerance? [2]
- Do you enjoy watching a spinning or blinking object? [2]
- In conversations, do you need extra time to carefully think out your reply, so that there may be a pause before you answer? [2]
- Are you bothered by clothes tags or light touch? [2]
- Do you get very tired after socializing, and need to regenerate alone? [2]
- Do you have certain routines which you need to follow? [2]
- Do you often don't know where to put your arms? [2]
- Are you hypo- or hypersensitive to physical pain, or even enjoy some types of pain? [2]
- Do you forget you are in a social situation when something gets your attention? [2]
- Do you dislike it when people stamp their foot in the floor? [2]
- Do you wring your hands, rub your hands together or twirl your fingers? [2]

Fortune
12-05-10, 08:10 PM
When I was still trying to work out what was going on with me a few years ago, I hit upon Asperger's as a possibility and sort of panicked. There was no reason for me to panic and I got over it fairly quickly, but then I forgot to talk to a doctor, so it never came to anything.

That test tells me:

Your Aspie score: 146 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 79 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

But I think a lot of the things I gave aspie answers for are also applicable to adhd and anxiety. And of course, not diagnostic, etc.

I've not been able to shake the idea that I have it, although I don't think I have it. I am just about where I want to know either way just to stop my brain from worrying over it. OTOH, if my anxiety-ridden brain wants to worry over something that doesn't bother me, this probably isn't too bad.

Scooter77
12-06-10, 06:52 AM
I am dx'd ADHD/Aspergers/SA/Major Depression.
Your Aspie score: 180 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 24 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

My son was dx'd ADHD/Aspergers at 4 (3 years ago) and while reading up on his dx I realised Aspergers hit pretty close to home.
I hit so much negativity in looking at an aspie dx as a female that I gave up.

2 years ago I was dx'd SA initially, then ADHD, that came as a shock. In hindsight I can see the ADHD, but my family thought I was OCD for various reasons. I have shocking anxiety which fluctuates and depending on my current situation can look like various disorders.

Early this year I had a really nasty bout of depression and I was really struggling with any type of social interaction. One day my counsellor suggested going for an aspie dx, she said a dx may make me feel better.
I was shocked, I'd given up on ASD.

I got the dx and it was a relief. I'm not crazy, or stupid, or insanely naive. And that is hugely comforting at times.

I'm 33, when I was a kid Aspergers barely existed and ADHD was considered only to be Bart Simpson.

I have always been insanely naive and painfully honest. I don't 'get' other people. I'm severly oversensitive to other people's emotions but I don't understand or know how to express that reaction. I can't watch the news or anything even remotely similar to my life because it triggers horrendous anxiety.

My whole life I thought I didnt feel emotions like other people, now I realise that I actually do but I don't know how to label them so I call everything anxiety.
I didnt know I was depressed until my psych made me fill in a depression scale and I could see it in b&w, I was suicidal, couldnt eat or sleep and had dropped to 46kg. But I kept saying I wasnt depressed!

I'm hypersensitive to sounds, lights, smells, tastes and touch. I can't do physical contact with anyone except my partner and children, and even my reaction to my partner varies depending on the situation and my mood.

I can't tolerate perfumes or smelly food, I'm constantly asking my partner if he brushed his teeth (lucky for me he's very tolerant!)
I don't eat anything green, or anything that feels 'slimy' - no seafood. I don't like to eat in restaurants or at other people's homes because their food is different.
I will keep wearing my favorite clothes until they are literally taken away from me.
If there is any possible way to get out of social occasions I will find it and use it.
I don't even enter my kids school because of the noise and people, I drop & pick up from an external entrance.

But worst of all, no matter how well I do in life I have a persistent inferiority complex. And in saying that, I have a good life.

So, I would say that if you are obsessed with ASD then maybe a dx will help, but it's not an easy road so be sure, and be prepared.

PS These arent things I dwell on normally, it's just info for you that I hope will help

Lunacie
12-06-10, 10:03 AM
Gosh, it always seems so surreal to read a post ^ about ME
that was written by someone who doesn't even know me.

String
12-06-10, 10:32 AM
Here's the score I received, but I feel I'm very different from what I see in the Autistic/Aspies around me. I don't really trust this as a diagnosis.

Your Aspie score: 156 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 52 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Lunacie
12-06-10, 10:42 AM
Here's the score I received, but I feel I'm very different from what I see in the Autistic/Aspies around me. I don't really trust this as a diagnosis.

Your Aspie score: 156 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 52 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Online tests are not meant to be a diagnosis. They are a clue that you should talk to your doctor and find out what's actually going on. There's a lot of overlap between ADHD and Asperger's, so it could be either or neither.

Why did you take the test if you don't think Asperger's is a possibility for you?

Fortune
12-06-10, 01:04 PM
There's also a lot of overlap between social phobias/anxiety and Asperger's.

String
12-06-10, 01:27 PM
Online tests are not meant to be a diagnosis. They are a clue that you should talk to your doctor and find out what's actually going on. There's a lot of overlap between ADHD and Asperger's, so it could be either or neither.

Why did you take the test if you don't think Asperger's is a possibility for you?

I took the test out of curiosity. I keep wondering if ADHD and autism (bipolar, OCD, anxiety) are just part of a single spectrum of disorders. There seem to be some overlap. They all appear to be highly genetic. Speaking of genes, when I look at families I know, including my own immediate and extended families, there are people diagnosed in all these areas.

I posted my results to reassure the OP that some of us other ADHDers might score high on that test, too. I don't think anyone who knows me would say I'm an Aspie (well, some might). I don't really know, though. It's hard to be very self-aware. I'll trust my doctor who diagnoses me as ADHD and the people around me who have said that treating the ADHD helps.

String
12-06-10, 01:45 PM
By the way, at an earlier time in my life (I'm now in my 40s), my true score might have been higher. I've learned to compensate for some of the issues on the questions.

I think I was a lot less self-aware back then, however, so I probably would've tested with a lower score.

I didn't recognize some of my own problems and issues, despite many failures and people telling me I had problems, before I was diagnosed with ADHD. For example, one of the ADHD questions is, "Do you have difficulty gathering the tools you need to complete a task?" I used to answer, "No." Why? Well, I knew I had difficulty starting tasks, but I had no idea that one of the reasons was because I wasn't getting my tools together to complete those tasks. I was just running off in a million directions going from task to task wondering why nothing was getting done. As I study ADHD (and things like Asperger's and OCD), I learn things about myself that I wasn't able to recognize before.

There's a danger in all this, though. Trying to be self-aware of too many things, trying to self-diagnose, could probably exacerbate issues.

Lunacie
12-06-10, 02:01 PM
I took the test out of curiosity. I keep wondering if ADHD and autism (bipolar, OCD, anxiety) are just part of a single spectrum of disorders. There seem to be some overlap. They all appear to be highly genetic. Speaking of genes, when I look at families I know, including my own immediate and extended families, there are people diagnosed in all these areas.

I posted my results to reassure the OP that some of us other ADHDers might score high on that test, too. I don't think anyone who knows me would say I'm an Aspie (well, some might). I don't really know, though. It's hard to be very self-aware. I'll trust my doctor who diagnoses me as ADHD and the people around me who have said that treating the ADHD helps.

I'm the same way, wondering about all the overlap between these neurologic disorders. I've seen recent research indicating that there's a connection between Migraine disorder and Seizure disorder, which makes me wonder even more about connections between other disorders, or all of them. Are they all part of one neurologic spectrum? My family has many cases of ADHD, Autism and Asperger's, also Migraine and Seizure Disorder. Then there are the ones who also have Anxiety Disorder and Depression. All very heriditary.


By the way, at an earlier time in my life (I'm now in my 40s), my true score might have been higher. I've learned to compensate for some of the issues on the questions.

I think I was a lot less self-aware back then, however, so I probably would've tested with a lower score.

I didn't recognize some of my own problems and issues, despite many failures and people telling me I had problems, before I was diagnosed with ADHD. For example, one of the ADHD questions is, "Do you have difficulty gathering the tools you need to complete a task?" I used to answer, "No." Why? Well, I knew I had difficulty starting tasks, but I had no idea that one of the reasons was because I wasn't getting my tools together to complete those tasks. I was just running off in a million directions going from task to task wondering why nothing was getting done. As I study ADHD (and things like Asperger's and OCD), I learn things about myself that I wasn't able to recognize before.

There's a danger in all this, though. Trying to be self-aware of too many things, trying to self-diagnose, could probably exacerbate issues.

Yeah, I think my score would have been even higher when I was younger - although I wonder how bad it would be if I stopped taking the supplements (Omega 3 and Vitamin D3 and Vitamin B12)?

I know that when we got my youngest granddaughter diagnosed in May of this year (2010), the specialist said that he would have definately have called her Autistic when she was younger, but that the therapies she's been getting have brought her to the point where he said the diagnosis now is Atypical Autism.

There may be a fine line between being a hypochondriac and looking for answers when we realize we actually have a problem. I think at times my family thought I was a hypochondriac or a drama queen looking for attention - but I knew I had some problems that weren't "normal" and I was looking for answers. I don't have a diagnosis of Asperger's or High Functioning Autism, but the therapist who confirmed my ADHD and Anxiety and Depression wasn't convinced my granddaughter was Autistic, so he would have hesitated to say I had Autism.

His first thought with both of us was Bipolar, and I had wondered that myself years ago, but had pretty much ruled it out. Once I started learning about Autism and Asperger's, that fit so much better and answered the questions, eh?

fracturedstory
12-08-10, 12:37 AM
Do you stim? Hand flap or do other repetitive movements to calm down.
Do you need order? A clean work area, room or like lining things up or stacking.
Do you need routines?
Do you write lists to get anything done?
Do you have to plan something down to the last detail?
Is your conversation style one-sided and very technical?
Do you hate change? And I mean get pretty distressed if things don't work out like you think they should.
Are you literal and don't always get sarcasm?
Overwhelmed by sounds, visual information (clutter), smells, touch?
Have fixed interests and an encyclopedic knowledge of those interests?

You probably do have Asperger's and ADHD together. If you're doing ok in life it may be hard to get diagnosed, especially if you can read people. Personally, I have a preference for books. Books are honest. It's all there on the page.

Btw selective mutism is when you only talk to people in one area and don't talk at all to people in another. I only talked very little at home. It's not a hiding your true self from people. It's not speaking at all to those people. Or you have a quiet mousy little voice when you start to speak to them.

String
12-08-10, 04:37 AM
Do you stim? Hand flap or do other repetitive movements to calm down.
No hand flapping. Lots of tapping, bouncing, rocking, etc. More than most people. ADHD.

Do you need order? A clean work area, room or like lining things up or stacking.
Not obsessively, but I often find that I have to clean something, like my closet, before I can think clearly or be productive. I think that's normal.

Do you need routines?
Yes. I like them. Sometimes I obsessive over them.

Do you write lists to get anything done?
Yes, often to the extreme. Mind maps and lists. Isn't this ADHD? How else am I supposed to do anything? I guess when I get some adrenaline about something, or when I'm drifting, the lists kind of move to the background.

Do you have to plan something down to the last detail?
Usually, yes. I want to be able to understand or fully visualize a project before I move forward. Some people say I'm stubborn this way.

Is your conversation style one-sided and very technical?
Uhm, yeah. I think some of this is mild social anxiety from ADHD and a work hazard, since I work in technical fields. I can sometimes get other people talking again, after I induce silence.

Do you hate change? And I mean get pretty distressed if things don't work out like you think they should.
I have some "shoulds." When I figure out something to the last detail, I expect things to work the way I figured them out. Isn't that normal?

Are you literal and don't always get sarcasm?
Are you being sarcastic? Just kidding. I can have my own biting wit. I sense sarcasm in others. So no, not at all. I'm told that I don't get excited with other people, however, or that I don't read other people's excitement or lack of it very well.

Overwhelmed by sounds, visual information (clutter), smells, touch?
Yes. But isn't this ADHD? Some songs take me away. So do sights and smells and touch. I'll just zone out and take something in, often when I'm not supposed to zone out. Certain sounds, especially eating sounds, can drive me crazy, especially if I'm moody. I think this is ADHD, part of the inattentiveness and distractability.

Have fixed interests and an encyclopedic knowledge of those interests?
People accuse me of acting like a know-it-all, but on several different subject (and I know I'm not because I forget too many things).

I think that I have ADHD.

Scooter77
12-08-10, 05:26 AM
They are difficult to distinguish between, there's a lot of areas where I'm not sure which is which. But I would say that Aspergers definitely accounts for...
- Feeling like everyone else knows something that I missed - all the time.
- Paranoia that everyone's looking at me because I'm making some obvious social faux-pas.
- Reading too deeply into other people - now I know that's because I don't naturally read facial expression so I try to guess what they mean, and apparently not very well!
- Obsessive ordering/cleaning that nearly got me dx'd OCD, everything in my house has a place and I know if its been moved, and if it has been moved I HAVE to put it back - but nobody else can put it back in just the right way!
- Weird, calming habits - OK I don't normally tell ppl this but when I need to de-stress I like to go outside and trim the edges of the lawn with scissors because it has to be even (plus I hate the sound of the line trimmer and I'm always paranoid I'm going to chop my foot off!)
hmm I think I'll leave it there....

sarek
12-08-10, 09:07 AM
I got this:

Your Aspie score: 112 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 97 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

The point is that I am usually pretty decent in understanding people. I don't read faces. But perhaps I am subconsciously employing my other senses, which are pretty acute, to compensate.

I think there is quite a bit of overlap between AS, AD(H)D and anxieties. Several questions could have fit more than one disorder.

AbsentMindProf
12-08-10, 10:00 AM
Someone with Asperger's, please read my symptoms and tell me that it's all in my head. I'm sure I'm just freaking myself out. Desperate for the attention, right? That's all it is... oh god...

I don't have Asperger syndrome but I have a son that does and I know several other people (of various ages) with Asperger syndrome. So I'll give you a few thoughts if you want.

Lack of demonstrated empathy
Most of the people I know that have Asperger syndrome have a strong sense of justice and often DO care about others -- when they understand what the other person is feeling. The major impediment in the Aspies I know is difficulty RECOGNIZING and UNDERSTANDING the other person's feelings. Of course, it's important to keep in mind that everyone with Asperger syndrome is an individual -- they are as different from each other as neurotypicals are from each other. Some say that they truly DON'T care about anyone else. Some care deeply about others but have trouble figuring out how others are feeling or what they are thinking.


Impaired non-verbal gestures
- I have never been one to make eye-contact. I HATE making eye-contact. It is the most uncomfortable thing in the world for me. I only ever do it when I know I must use it to make a point. And, while I'm very good at reading body language, my own body language has always felt awkward and clumsy. I feel like I have to manually operate my body language, you know what I mean? If I'm not consciously changing my facial expressions/tone of voice, I end up looking blank and speaking in a monotone. I've always been one to maintain a stone-cold poker face, so to speak. It's very rare for me to express any emotion without purposefully meaning to do it. I never wear my heart on my sleeve. It makes me feel so fake.

Some of this does sound VERY typical of someone with Asperger syndrome, except that I've never known someone with Asperger syndrome that was good at reading body language. Generally, it's exactly the opposite for folks with AS -- they usually have a LOT of trouble reading body language. My 8 year old son, for example, has almost NO ability to read body language. My NT 4 year old consistently picks up on other people's body language faster than he does. The traits you describe could fit a social anxiety disorder quite well.


Selective mutism
- I only open up to a select few people. Few people know the real me, the rest just get a facade: the image of normality, as interpreted by my crazy mind. I've learned to fake most social interaction, but I don't enjoy it. Not at all. I hate meeting new people. I hate being around large groups of people (in fact, I'm prone to panic attacks if I'm alone in a large crowd, part of the reason I've done so poorly in college: going to class is WAY TOO STRESSFUL). I was diagnosed as having social anxiety, so that could just be it. Regardless, people make me uncomfortable. I prefer spending as much time alone as possible, or in the company of a few very close friends. I've gotten much better at this, and can usually interact with new people fairly well, but it's got to be in small groups, otherwise I'm definitely going to get overwhelmed.

All of this sounds very much like AS but, again, it ALSO sounds a lot like a social anxiety disorder.


Reading Other People
- I am EXCELLENT at reading peoples' facial expressions and body language, but not when I'm being addressed. When observing interactions between other people, I can effortlessly pick apart every aspect of those people. I can determine motivations, hidden meanings, whether or not someone is lying, etc etc, but never when I'm being spoken to. There is too much anxiety from having to focus on what they are saying to be able to discern hidden meanings. I'm often slow to pick up on social cues. I've had a hard time understanding this. I'm a freaking god of social interaction... as long as I don't have to participate...

But this REALLY doesn't sound like Asperger syndrome to me. One of the defining traits of Asperger syndrome is difficulty reading facial expressions, tone of voice, body language and difficulty picking up on nonliteral or hidden meanings. This is starting to sound more like social anxiety to me.

Honestly, much of what you have written sounds more like a social anxiety disorder than Asperger syndrome to me. However, the internet is not the place to get a diagnosis and I'm certainly not the person to give one under ANY circumstances. :) If you really want to know, I think you should find a psychologist or psychiatrist with expertise in autism and/or social anxiety disorders and get an answer from a real expert.

PixiePlumber
12-08-10, 10:10 AM
Your Aspie score: 89 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 127 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

That's what I was expecting. I knew I would get a few of the asperger's points as some of the questions were ADHD symptoms :) But I know I'm not and aspie :)

Fortune
12-08-10, 12:44 PM
Something that always seems odd to me, and I mean this has seemed odd to me over a period of years is that people often seem to enjoy using autistic children to point out what autistic people in general are or should be like, but it seems to me that the human brain continues maturing until the age of 30 or so, which suggests to me that many things an autistic child might have difficulty with an autistic adult may have less difficulty with (barring regression, losing skills, etc, which can also happen). For a point of comparison, one of the reasons older longitudinal studies identified that ADHD was something you grew out of was that at 21, ADHDers would routinely report that they didn't have much trouble with ADHD. But Barkley found that if he invited the parents to speak and looked at things like report cards and job evaluations that the symptoms for most were still as strong as ever despite self-reporting, and that the self-reporting became more accurate as they became older and self-awareness became more developed. By the same logic that says a young AS child has this particular symptom and therefore it is an enduring trait for all AS people, we could also argue that ADHDers lack self-awareness* at all ages because 21 year olds failed to accurately report the persistence of their ADHD symptoms.

Of course, it's also true that social anxiety and ADHD both have pretty strong overlaps with Asperger's Syndrome, to the point that it's pretty easy to score high on AS tests just on the basis of those two things. There are other traits that people with AS have that are distinct, and there are probably quizzes to test some of those things (like the Empathizing/Systemizing Test (http://eqsq.com/eq-sq-tests/), this test for reading eyes (http://glennrowe.net/BaronCohen/Faces/EyesTest.aspx), this emotional IQ test (http://www.queendom.com/index.htm), and the Cambridge Face Memory Test (http://www.faceblind.org/facetests/fgcfmt/fgcfmt_intro.php)).

Obviously none of these tests are diagnostic, although they seem pretty decent for internet quizzes. I wouldn't use them as the basis for self-diagnosis. They could be suggestive with other reasons for suspicion, and of course if you feel that having a diagnosis or ruling one out would help you, then it's probably a good idea to talk to a psychiatrist about it.

* This would be, of course, totally wrong.

fracturedstory
12-09-10, 02:41 AM
I know lots of aspies who can read body language. I used to be good at it from memorising it from Lie to Me. It's gone now.
People do learn skills and can overcome some symptoms. Like me, I can talk to people now.


Do you stim? Hand flap or do other repetitive movements to calm down.
No hand flapping. Lots of tapping, bouncing, rocking, etc. More than most people. ADHD.

Stimming is not fidgeting. It's a calm down method.


Do you write lists to get anything done?
Yes, often to the extreme. Mind maps and lists. Isn't this ADHD? How else am I supposed to do anything? I guess when I get some adrenaline about something, or when I'm drifting, the lists kind of move to the background.

Those with autism don't just write lists but enjoy writing lists.


Do you hate change? And I mean get pretty distressed if things don't work out like you think they should.
I have some "shoulds." When I figure out something to the last detail, I expect things to work the way I figured them out. Isn't that normal?

I will yell and cry an scream and hit my head if something changes and nobody warned me about it. I don't think that's normal.


Overwhelmed by sounds, visual information (clutter), smells, touch?
Yes. But isn't this ADHD? Some songs take me away. So do sights and smells and touch. I'll just zone out and take something in, often when I'm not supposed to zone out. Certain sounds, especially eating sounds, can drive me crazy, especially if I'm moody. I think this is ADHD, part of the inattentiveness and distractability.

Certain sounds that drive you crazy = misophonia
Hypersensitivity to sounds = Sensory Processing Disorder; common in autism and ADHD. Far worse in autism though.
I actually meant overwhelmed as actually experiencing pain from those things.

Sorry but I get a little bit annoyed when people say something is ADHD or normal. But your interpretation might be different to what I'm alluding to. It makes me feels like it's not an autism symptom when I know personally that it is.
Autism and AS is really about the intensity. You are your special interest. You must have routines to function. Sensory stimuli can be unbearable.
But there is also a connection to autism and ADHD. I guess it is the whole pre-frontal cortex dysfunction. I know I have both because it's difficult to find the inattentive symptoms in just autism.

Lunacie
12-09-10, 11:14 AM
>>
Certain sounds that drive you crazy = misophonia
Hypersensitivity to sounds = Sensory Processing Disorder; common in autism and ADHD. Far worse in autism though.
I actually meant overwhelmed as actually experiencing pain from those things.

Sorry but I get a little bit annoyed when people say something is ADHD or normal. But your interpretation might be different to what I'm alluding to. It makes me feels like it's not an autism symptom when I know personally that it is.
Autism and AS is really about the intensity. You are your special interest. You must have routines to function. Sensory stimuli can be unbearable.
But there is also a connection to autism and ADHD. I guess it is the whole pre-frontal cortex dysfunction. I know I have both because it's difficult to find the inattentive symptoms in just autism.

Sensory Processing Disorder can affect all our senses, not just our hearing. Lights, smells, touch and texture all bother me, but noise definately bothers me the most.

I do experience pain from some noises, fortunately not too many. Loud bass on car stereos makes my chest hurt. Motorcycles do the same and make my head hurt too. Everyone finds whining children annoying, but it's more than annoying to me. Children who scream while they're playing - crikey! I always run outside with my cell phone in hand to find out who's been hurt, ready to call 911. The kids in our neighborhood think I'm a freak.

It's funny, the only trait of Autism I don't have is having special interests to the exclusion of anything else. Maybe I have Atypical Autism like my granddaughter has been diagnosed with, eh?

String
12-09-10, 04:20 PM
fracturedstory: the way you describe those symptoms in yourself is what I would think of as AS; that's not the way I would describe them in me. When you said it was probably different interpretations, I would agree. It's also different degrees.

NoReally
12-21-10, 02:58 PM
I've not been able to shake the idea that I have it, although I don't think I have it.

This is the conclusion I've come to about myself: I think that in my family, there are a lot of traits that lean heavily towards Asperger traits. In my brother, I think he's pretty clearly Aspie. A couple of the rest of us have those traits too, to varying extents and with varying repurcussions. I've had quite a lot of trouble with some things, but I don't think I would be diagnosable (and it's not worth the effort).

Example: One day in high school, over 20 years ago, I wore brown-and-white striped pants. A boy sitting next to me said they looked like wrapping paper, like on a present.

Over 20 years I have pondered this comment, off and on. It will come to me at odd moments, and I puzzle over what he meant by that.

Last week, I was thinking of it again. Suddenly it hit me -- he was flirting! Implying something about unwrapping. Mystery mostly solved. Now, maybe in another couple decades I can come up with a response?

I have a lot of trouble with being extremely literal like that. I spend so much of my life having these vague, uneasy feelings that there is subtext going on in other people's conversations, subtext I can't quite figure out. It makes me nervous -- I have so very many circumstances where I don't know how to respond in a conversation. Should I respond to what I think was said? Or pause a moment and see if I can understand the subtext? And then, so many times when I must have responded wrong based on the way people around me chuckle.

I have enormous trouble making eye contact. I relate instantly to animals, but poorly to people. I've come to realize lately how often my behavior is a bit weird, even with those few people I'm comfortable with, people who I thought I was being "normal" with. I am terribly upset by criticism. I hate, hate to admit it, but I have been very rigidly black-and-white in my moral thinking, even though I struggle to be non-judgmental and kind. I'm rather clumsy. I tend to speak and write in an overly formal way that drives me crazy but I can't help. (When I was 8, I remember a kid at tennis camp asking me if I was British because of the weird way I talked.) I get nervous and overwhelmed in large crowds. I have no sense of direction; I'm always getting lost. I am no good at remembering names or recognizing people. (Had an embarrassing moment related to that just this morning, with giving Christmas gifts to my daughter's teachers. My face is burning up right now just thinking about it. How stupid of me. Just at the moment I was trying to be a good female, thoughtfully passing out handmade Christmas gifts, and instead once again I make a fool of myself.)

But, I don't think I've ever done any stimming type stuff. I'm the opposite of neat & tidy. I probably don't "hyperfocus" more than anyone else. I don't have any extreme, narrowly-focused interests. I have a few "sensory" issues, like I detest lotion on my palms, but not like I've seen others describe.

So, I think I miss on enough of the criteria that I'd never be diagnosed that way. But regardless, the things that I do have trouble with are major difficulties. Where does that leave someone like me?

Fortune
12-21-10, 04:32 PM
There is such a thing as "broad autistic phenotype" where you have autistic traits but not enough to be diagnosed. There's also PDD-NOS for if you don't fit into either autistic or AS criteria, but still need a diagnosis (I think?).

I'm not sure about the quoted statement. Right now I would say that I think the possibility is strong enough that I intend to discuss it with a psychiatrist in the near future. What would have been more accurate for me to say then is "I suspect, but I don't know."

daveddd
12-21-10, 05:52 PM
i have to find it!

i read something legit that said something like 1 in 20 or something people who self diagnosis themselves with aspergers actually have it

its becoming a self diagnosed epidemic


the symptoms are so vague that most shy people can diagnosis themselves with it


most the time its social anxiety

depression is another one

Fortune
12-21-10, 06:32 PM
Do you mean the study referenced by several rather, er, irreverent articles that was apparently done by Dr. Leon McCrouch and published in the Lancet in 2004? I can't seem to find a Dr. McCrouch on the Lancet's page and no article about self-diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome in the Lancet. Disappointing, because I am very curious, and I would love to see a rundown of the typical incorrect traps and assumptions.

I kind of wonder if/suspect that this was just a joke meant to mock self-diagnosis.

daveddd
12-21-10, 06:47 PM
Do you mean the study referenced by several rather, er, irreverent articles that was apparently done by Dr. Leon McCrouch and published in the Lancet in 2004? I can't seem to find a Dr. McCrouch on the Lancet's page and no article about self-diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome in the Lancet. Disappointing, because I am very curious, and I would love to see a rundown of the typical incorrect traps and assumptions.

I kind of wonder if/suspect that this was just a joke meant to mock self-diagnosis.

nope, i dont mock

and that wasnt it

i will try to find it, it may take a while due to the amount of studying of the subjects (never particularly studied self diagnosis of aspergers)

you have to admit though, some of the symptoms listed in this thread are pretty suspect

Fortune
12-21-10, 07:07 PM
nope, i dont mock

and that wasnt it

i will try to find it, it may take a while due to the amount of studying of the subjects (never particularly studied self diagnosis of aspergers)

you have to admit though, some of the symptoms listed in this thread are pretty suspect

I didn't say you were mocking. I said the articles I found were mocking.

That is literally the only information I can find with google. I'll keep trying, but I am at this point suspicious as to whether any such study exists. I'm not stating an opinion on how many people are wrong about self-diagnosis, simply my skepticism about whether this has been formally studied. I do not usually have trouble finding research papers, and one on this topic seems elusive.

I find that Michael Carley says that the majority of people who are self-diagnosed are probably correct, but I am uncertain how he came to that conclusion. It may simply be he wanted to maintain a supportive atmosphere. Also, as far as he's concerned, people who self-diagnosed are dealing with something, and being wrong means not dealing with whatever is actually wrong, so seeking a diagnosis if at all possible is probably advisable... which is by itself problematic and difficult - at least in the US where so many people don't have access to health care at all.

daveddd
12-21-10, 07:13 PM
I didn't say you were mocking. I said the articles I found were mocking.

That is literally the only information I can find with google. I'll keep trying, but I am at this point suspicious as to whether any such study exists. I'm not stating an opinion on how many people are wrong about self-diagnosis, simply my skepticism about whether this has been formally studied. I do not usually have trouble finding research papers, and one on this topic seems elusive.

I find that Michael Carley says that the majority of people who are self-diagnosed are probably correct, but I am uncertain how he came to that conclusion. It may simply be he wanted to maintain a supportive atmosphere. Also, as far as he's concerned, people who self-diagnosed are dealing with something, and being wrong means not dealing with whatever is actually wrong, so seeking a diagnosis if at all possible is probably advisable... which is by itself problematic and difficult - at least in the US where so many people don't have access to health care at all.




sorry thought you meant me

anyway people can diagnose themselves with every disorder in the book as far as im concerned

i would just hate to see someone call themselves autistic , and miss the chance for a simple medication or therapy fix for something like social anxiety

on usually having no problem finding articles -i also have 3 paid subscriptions to psych journals with information i usually dont find elsewhere

Fortune
12-21-10, 07:17 PM
sorry thought you meant me

anyway people can diagnose themselves with every disorder in the book as far as im concerned

i would just hate to see someone call themselves autistic , and miss the chance for a simple medication or therapy fix for something like social anxiety

on usually having no problem finding articles -i also have 3 paid subscriptions to psych journals with information i usually dont find elsewhere

Sorry I was unclear - I don't think you're the kind of guy who mocks like that.

I know in my case? It doesn't matter whether or not I have AS, I still have anxiety. Diagnosis or not, that's going to get medicated.

That's interesting that they're not? So many studies are at least indexed on sites like pubmed and can be downloaded for a fee (although I don't usually bother to buy any). This is absolutely an article I want to read, though.

daveddd
12-21-10, 07:19 PM
Sorry I was unclear - I don't think you're the kind of guy who mocks like that.

I know in my case? It doesn't matter whether or not I have AS, I still have anxiety. Diagnosis or not, that's going to get medicated.

That's interesting that they're not? So many studies are at least indexed on sites like pubmed and can be downloaded for a fee (although I don't usually bother to buy any).

i will find it eventually and post it

oh boy might be in for a long night

what are you taking for social anxiety

Fortune
12-21-10, 07:29 PM
i will find it eventually and post it

oh boy might be in for a long night

what are you taking for social anxiety

Don't put too much energy into it! Taking care of yourself is important too.

I was taking paxil and klonopin, but that was the last time I had insurance, in 2003. I got some valerian extract from a low-income clinic in 2004-2005, which helped a bit but I can still taste it. :mad: I had something in 2005 or 2006 that was a benzo but I forget what name, and it was mainly to stop a resurgence of panic attacks and help me sleep. Since then? Nothing. My panic attacks are much less frequent and I tend to cope with them better (being able to recognize them as panic attacks helps, as well as being able to stop and take an inventory of actual symptoms I'm experiencing and what they mean). I still have anxiety issues, but not so much with the acute attacks on a regular basis. Maybe once a week at most.

I was actually diagnosed with GAD in the late 90s, and PTSD just a few weeks ago. "Social Anxiety" was actually a self-diagnosis on my part to explain how I socialize with people and why I don't socialize much, although I started to just look at it as part of GAD.

daveddd
12-21-10, 07:34 PM
i wish stims helped my SA like people on here

they actually make it worse

not at the time of the situation though, that it may help a hair , rarely a lot

my biggest issue with SA is the rumination, and when i get more open in social situations , the more severe my rumination becomes when the meds where off

im guessing that ties into depression, so next im tryin prozac, never tried an ssri

my only worry is well butrin made me terrifyingly manic

Fortune
12-21-10, 07:44 PM
I never found that ephedra or caffeine (haven't tried actual ADHD medications yet) made my anxiety worse. If anything, I found that I had less rumination or hesitation when doing things. The worst panic attacks happened to me while I was taking ephedra (but I continued taking it for two more years with little difficulty). I was also attending school and the work was getting harder and more difficult for me to focus on enough to get it right, and I was drinking a lot of diet Dr. Pepper.

I believe based on experiences later that aspartame may be a migraine trigger and also triggers panic attacks. Whenever I've tried it again since, after maybe a week at most I start to feel panic seeping in at the edges.

One thing about social situations is that I start off fairly uncomfortable but once I socialize I get more ... into interacting with people. I go from mostly quiet to very talkative. But socializing also wears me out a lot - I feel burnt out and exhausted by too much of it, especially with too many people, and it's hard to keep up with more than a couple at a time. It's like I feel like my brain is stretched too thin...

But at the same time, with unexpected guests or whatever, I completely avoid them, even if they're relatives (but not immediate relatives). When my aunt visits unannounced I just have a very difficult time coping with it, even though I do like her.

daveddd
12-21-10, 07:52 PM
I never found that ephedra or caffeine (haven't tried actual ADHD medications yet) made my anxiety worse. If anything, I found that I had less rumination or hesitation when doing things. The worst panic attacks happened to me while I was taking ephedra (but I continued taking it for two more years with little difficulty). I was also attending school and the work was getting harder and more difficult for me to focus on enough to get it right, and I was drinking a lot of diet Dr. Pepper.

I believe based on experiences later that aspartame may be a migraine trigger and also triggers panic attacks. Whenever I've tried it again since, after maybe a week at most I start to feel panic seeping in at the edges.

One thing about social situations is that I start off fairly uncomfortable but once I socialize I get more ... into interacting with people. I go from mostly quiet to very talkative. But socializing also wears me out a lot - I feel burnt out and exhausted by too much of it, especially with too many people, and it's hard to keep up with more than a couple at a time. It's like I feel like my brain is stretched too thin...

But at the same time, with unexpected guests or whatever, I completely avoid them, even if they're relatives (but not immediate relatives). When my aunt visits unannounced I just have a very difficult time coping with it, even though I do like her.


familiarity helps my SA

not the post event ruminations, its quite a bizarre experience


flashbacks of perceived negatives can date back years far enough back, that i dont even remember positive items from that time period

Velvetdragon
12-22-10, 03:58 AM
I have tooooons of symptoms and scored very high on this test (I forget what) but I definitely don't have Asperger's.

Instead I have pretty severe sensory processing disorder (sensory integration dysfunction), which results in me stimming, having issues with sounds, visual info, smells, especially touch. It really interferes with my life. SPD inflates my scores, I think. (It should be noted that some professionals don't think SPD is a separate disorder. If not, I have no idea what mine is a part of.)

When people hear about my sensory issues, 90 times out of a hundred, they suggest autistic spectrum disorder. XD

But I have no difficulty reading body language or facial expressions, and my facial expressions and body language are read well by others, no trouble understanding or using inflection or tone, understanding sarcasm, etc. I do share with others voluntarily. I have never had MANY friends, but I had a friend my age throughout most of my childhood, and I have a couple my age now, as well. So it's really not a fit at all.

My social problems are mostly caused by my being geeky and having anxiety.

I have the encyclopedic knowledge thing going on, I get super super super obsessed with things. I can talk for hours and hours and hours on my favorite subjects. If I'm kept from my interests, my entire sense of well-being collapses. However, I have more than one or two restricted subjects, which is part of the diagnostic criteria (I have more than five or six or ten or twelve...).

I have routines I have to follow. I freak out and can't function without them.

But *for me* these are related to other disorders than AS or whatever.

I do, however, tend to get along very well with aspies, especially if their interests overlap with mine. I actually have to be very careful if I end up with an autistic or aspie client when I'm doing therapy that I don't get sucked in to spending the whole time focusing on that interest. Especially because parents seem to think, for some reason, if they're so into it, they shouldn't get to talk about it at all? Doesn't make sense to me. Heh.

bof00
12-22-10, 06:11 PM
Your Aspie score: 124 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 77 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

I just don't fit in to social norms I think. Everytime I read something on AS I'm confused. I have so many similarities but some other things are just not me, like change - I NEED change. I did act more aspie when younger though. I wonder what the average ADD person scores on this.

That1WierdGirl
12-22-10, 11:12 PM
Lets see

AQS results = 64

Aspie-Quiz results

Your Aspie score: 150 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 68 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

I too am not entirely convinced. As others have said many of the questions on the quiz could be several other things such as ADD, Social Anxiety and so forth. Sure one may have a lot of aspie traits and even get along great with aspies but that doesn't mean it couldn't be a combination of other things that when put together could give the impression of being asbergers.

I was going to write more but someone just turned on the television and my train of thought was derailed and crashed badly.

Fortune
12-22-10, 11:18 PM
Neither of these quizzes can diagnose. The AQ itself is I think intended to be a screening tool - if someone scores high enough, dig deeper.

Any suspicions I have don't come from quizzes. The quizzes just sort of highlight them a bit.

fracturedstory
12-23-10, 05:31 AM
I find it hilarious the amount of excuses people are making about scoring high on the aspies quiz.
I mean maybe you don't have it but I find it funny that you're all basically saying the same thing.
Btw you don't need to have all the symptoms to have AS. I know aspies that can read body language. And not many of them struggle with tone of voice. I think I over exaggerate tone of voice. Every one is yelling at me when they're not.
The aspie quiz is the most detailed quiz there is and it's made by an autistic. he/ she updates it quite a lot too.
And honestly, what person with autism doesn't have anxiety?
Anxiety cripples me. I have anxiety about crossing roads, doing any little thing different, going to concerts, going to supermarkets, being around water/ heights, etc. And to top that off I have sensory anxiety.

Asperger's feels like no big thing to me. I wouldn't mind having that than this autism condition that makes me fluctuate between moderate and high functioning. I have what I like to refer to as 'traditional autistic symptoms.' It's just so damn obvious that I'm autistic. My routines that must be kept. My dislike of bright clothing. My meltdowns over any little thing. My inability to grasp sarcasm. Hating change so much it would regress me.

Fortune
12-23-10, 05:58 AM
One thing I don't think is well known about the autism quotient is that 80% of people on the autistic spectrum score above 32, but when screening someone, 26 is the suggested score to seriously consider further testing.

The Aspie Quiz was actually really informative/helpful - unlike the AQ. It pointed things out in an organized list that would be easy to otherwise miss. At the time I first filled it out, I was just "oh, well, differential diagnoses could account for this" but when I've already had this on my mind for years, it wasn't really that simple to dismiss. Also, I was never actually diagnosed with social anxiety, I just assumed I had it because symptoms. I was diagnosed with GAD. Social situations never triggered my worst anxiety symptoms, and I had a lot of issues around socializing even when I was able to socialize regularly.

Anyway, worrying about having autism or AS strikes me as a waste of time: Either you do have it, in which case you've always had it. Learning won't change that fact, you'll just have more information about yourself. Or you don't have it, in which case you never had it, so again you're not documenting a change.

Also, I'm pretty sure autistic and AS people are able to have multiple interests. Imagine being stuck with one thing for your entire life.

fracturedstory
12-23-10, 06:04 AM
One thing I don't think is well known about the autism quotient is that 80% of people on the autistic spectrum score above 32, but when screening someone, 26 is the suggested score to seriously consider further testing.

The Aspie Quiz was actually really informative/helpful - unlike the AQ. It pointed things out in an organized list that would be easy to otherwise miss. At the time I first filled it out, I was just "oh, well, differential diagnoses could account for this" but when I've already had this on my mind for years, it wasn't really that simple to dismiss. Also, I was never actually diagnosed with social anxiety, I just assumed I had it because symptoms. I was diagnosed with GAD. Social situations never triggered my worst anxiety symptoms, and I had a lot of issues around socializing even when I was able to socialize regularly.

Anyway, worrying about having autism or AS strikes me as a waste of time: Either you do have it, in which case you've always had it. Learning won't change that fact, you'll just have more information about yourself. Or you don't have it, in which case you never had it, so again you're not documenting a change.

Also, I'm pretty sure autistic and AS people are able to have multiple interests. Imagine being stuck with one thing for your entire life.
For my first 10 years of life I only had one interest. Drawing.
I think the more severe your autism is the more you are stuck on just one thing. You have heard the Pinball Wizard song by The Who right?

Soon AS will simply be 'autistic disorder' or 'social communication disorder.' Hmm right...I don't mind the former but SCD just sounds like social anxiety 2.0.

Fortune
12-23-10, 06:17 AM
For my first 10 years of life I only had one interest. Drawing.
I think the more severe your autism is the more you are stuck on just one thing. You have heard the Pinball Wizard song by The Who right?

True. That last bit about being stuck was not appropriate. I meant mainly, that over a long enough lifespan other interests can crop up? It seems to be common, at least?

Soon AS will simply be 'autistic disorder' or 'social communication disorder.' Hmm right...I don't mind the former but SCD just sounds like social anxiety 2.0.

SCD sounds redundant with autistic disorder, social anxiety, and schizoid personality disorder... but what do I know?

I think the change is a good choice, and the distinction between AS and autism is pretty arbitrary as it is. One criteria, and it's sometimes used to diagnose people as AS who fit the autistic criteria?

Velvetdragon
12-23-10, 02:02 PM
I don't feel I'm making excuses. I don't feel I'm denying something true about myself. I just don't have it, and feel that it is being honest to say that.

No one who knows me IRL (including myself) would even begin to think I had it, and I work with people on the spectrum for a living, as do my coworkers, so it's not out of ignorance of the symptoms.

Doesn't change the fact I score high on this test. *shrugs*

I looked at the test and symptoms of the disorder *from childhood*, not just in my current adult state. And I've never had just one (or a few) interests. It's really really common for people with Asperger's to have one or two interests that are super specific and defined. Most of my Aspie clients are young, though I have a few teens and adults. The kids especially usually have one or two things that that's all they want to do and talk about.

And I've never had any problems with communication. I'm really good at it. ;)

daveddd
12-23-10, 02:30 PM
if the quiz is made by someone who is autistic, i doubt they can completely distinguish aspie symptoms from other co morbids or simple personality traits, they update it constantly? every time their mood changes?

its like sam vaknin , he takes every feeling he ever had and makes it a "symptom " of narcissism

i see a lot of people who say they know several aspies who dont have several of the most prominent autistic features

its like me saying i know several adhd people without attention or hyperactivity symptoms

Fortune
12-23-10, 03:46 PM
I looked at the test and symptoms of the disorder *from childhood*, not just in my current adult state. And I've never had just one (or a few) interests. It's really really common for people with Asperger's to have one or two interests that are super specific and defined. Most of my Aspie clients are young, though I have a few teens and adults. The kids especially usually have one or two things that that's all they want to do and talk about.

I shouldn't have made that comment, actually. Sorry about that.

if the quiz is made by someone who is autistic, i doubt they can completely distinguish aspie symptoms from other co morbids or simple personality traits, they update it constantly? every time their mood changes?

I get the impression it's based on feedback and answers given in previous iterations of the quiz? I wouldn't assume that just because the author is autistic that this also means he is imperceptive and incapable of drawing distinctions between autistic behaviors and other comorbidities, or that he's editing it whimsically based on how he feels that day. I don't know what methods he uses, but in general it seems that people on the autistic spectrum score higher on the aspie part of the quiz and lower on the nt part of the quiz.

i see a lot of people who say they know several aspies who dont have several of the most prominent autistic features

its like me saying i know several adhd people without attention or hyperactivity symptomsThis might be an overinterpretation of what fracturedstory said. My own observation is that there's a tendency for people to suggest that certain traits exist in all autistic people, and perceive those traits as defining (such as the idea that autistic people do not have theory of mind or lack empathy) and enduring, even though it's autistic children who have the most trouble with ToM and many grow out of it as they get older and their brains develop.

Or that for many people with AS, sensory problems can be more debilitating than social problems. Or that some can learn to socialize appropriately (although it requires more processing to read people than NTs need to do).

daveddd
12-23-10, 05:32 PM
I shouldn't have made that comment, actually. Sorry about that.



I get the impression it's based on feedback and answers given in previous iterations of the quiz? I wouldn't assume that just because the author is autistic that this also means he is imperceptive and incapable of drawing distinctions between autistic behaviors and other comorbidities, or that he's editing it whimsically based on how he feels that day. I don't know what methods he uses, but in general it seems that people on the autistic spectrum score higher on the aspie part of the quiz and lower on the nt part of the quiz.

This might be an overinterpretation of what fracturedstory said. My own observation is that there's a tendency for people to suggest that certain traits exist in all autistic people, and perceive those traits as defining (such as the idea that autistic people do not have theory of mind or lack empathy) and enduring, even though it's autistic children who have the most trouble with ToM and many grow out of it as they get older and their brains develop.

Or that for many people with AS, sensory problems can be more debilitating than social problems. Or that some can learn to socialize appropriately (although it requires more processing to read people than NTs need to do).

incapable or a skewed reference,

how many posts on this board start with "is this adhd"?


clean working spaces, lists? things like that i believe have nothing to do with being autistic


do some searches in this website, you would be suprised how self diagnosed autistic people lack, flat affect, obsessions, improper social interaction and things like that

anyway just trying to have a second half to a debate

im bored


and i apologize if i seem harsh or anything, i didnt know autistic traits were something people grow out of

that might make me reevaluate things


and to be honest im really not all that sure what sensory issues are exactly

i know what it means but not the extreme or anything

Fortune
12-23-10, 07:28 PM
incapable or a skewed reference,

how many posts on this board start with "is this adhd"?

I'd be more wondering about his interest in neanderthals than the other. I doubt he gets his information from forum postings. He appears to use other methods to gather information.

clean working spaces, lists? things like that i believe have nothing to do with being autisticThey're not part of the diagnostic criteria, but it's entirely likely that he's found that a lot of ASD people like these things or even depend on them.

do some searches in this website, you would be suprised how self diagnosed autistic people lack, flat affect, obsessions, improper social interaction and things like thatI'm not sure I understand what you mean. I know clinically diagnosed autistic people who apparently lack these things online, but this may not reflect how they interact offline or in other venues. You may also be interacting with them in the context of one of their special interests, in which the obsession may not stand out without any contrast.

and i apologize if i seem harsh or anything, i didnt know autistic traits were something people grow out of

that might make me reevaluate thingsI think that there's a wide diversity here. Sometimes compensation, sometimes maturation. I am not sure "grow out of" is a good generalization (because I do not know enough to say), but is it really appropriate to compare a 10 year old child to a 30 year old adult (for example) when determining whether the adult is autistic? Like with ADHD, the diagnostic criteria are geared toward children and brains continue to mature.

But not everyone "outgrows" things or develops skills to cope with them. This article suggests that autism is a spectrum of many different things (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1191843-1,00.html), which means there's a lot of diversity along that spectrum.

and to be honest im really not all that sure what sensory issues are exactly

i know what it means but not the extreme or anythingSensitivities to sound, light, touch, smell, taste. Experiencing some sensations as unpleasant when others would not. Being overstimulated to the point of meltdown or shutdown (not an ADHD thing). ADHDers can have these too, although I think it's milder for ADHDers than autistic people (and AS is milder than autism).

Oh, that is an ugly post. Sorry, all. :( I obviously didn't think this through.

Lunacie
12-23-10, 07:45 PM
I'd be more wondering about his interest in neanderthals than the other. I doubt he gets his information from forum postings. He appears to use other methods to gather information.

They're not part of the diagnostic criteria, but it's entirely likely that he's found that a lot of ASD people like these things or even depend on them.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean. I know clinically diagnosed autistic people who apparently lack these things online, but this may not reflect how they interact offline or in other venues. You may also be interacting with them in the context of one of their special interests, in which the obsession may not stand out without any contrast.

I think that there's a wide diversity here. Sometimes compensation, sometimes maturation. I am not sure "grow out of" is a good generalization (because I do not know enough to say), but is it really appropriate to compare a 10 year old child to a 30 year old adult (for example) when determining whether the adult is autistic? Like with ADHD, the diagnostic criteria are geared toward children and brains continue to mature.

But not everyone "outgrows" things or develops skills to cope with them. This article suggests that autism is a spectrum of many different things (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1191843-1,00.html), which means there's a lot of diversity along that spectrum.

Sensitivities to sound, light, touch, smell, taste. Experiencing some sensations as unpleasant when others would not. Being overstimulated to the point of meltdown or shutdown (not an ADHD thing). ADHDers can have these too, although I think it's milder for ADHDers than autistic people (and AS is milder than autism).

Oh, that is an ugly post. Sorry, all. :( I obviously didn't think this through.

Why do you say it's ugly? These are the things I had written in response but then my computer dumped before they could post to the thread.

No one outgrows ADHD and Autism either, we just learn ways of coping and adapting. We learn the rules of society and try to fit in.

About 1 in 20 people have some degree of Sensory Processing Disorder, the prevalence is much higher in those who have ADHD, Autism and Fragile X syndrome.

I have Sensory Processing Disorder. Lights are too bright, noises are too loud or annoying or both, smells are too strong and make me sick (migraines and allergic reactions), I can only wear a few types of fabric and shoes, I tend to eat the same things and don't usually care for anything new.

Here is a listing of common traits of Sensory Processing Disorder. (http://www.spdfoundation.net/redflags.html)

daveddd
12-23-10, 07:46 PM
I'd be more wondering about his interest in neanderthals than the other. I doubt he gets his information from forum postings. He appears to use other methods to gather information.

They're not part of the diagnostic criteria, but it's entirely likely that he's found that a lot of ASD people like these things or even depend on them.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean. I know clinically diagnosed autistic people who apparently lack these things online, but this may not reflect how they interact offline or in other venues. You may also be interacting with them in the context of one of their special interests, in which the obsession may not stand out without any contrast.

I think that there's a wide diversity here. Sometimes compensation, sometimes maturation. I am not sure "grow out of" is a good generalization (because I do not know enough to say), but is it really appropriate to compare a 10 year old child to a 30 year old adult (for example) when determining whether the adult is autistic? Like with ADHD, the diagnostic criteria are geared toward children and brains continue to mature.

But not everyone "outgrows" things or develops skills to cope with them. This article suggests that autism is a spectrum of many different things (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1191843-1,00.html), which means there's a lot of diversity along that spectrum.

Sensitivities to sound, light, touch, smell, taste. Experiencing some sensations as unpleasant when others would not. Being overstimulated to the point of meltdown or shutdown (not an ADHD thing). ADHDers can have these too, although I think it's milder for ADHDers than autistic people (and AS is milder than autism).

Oh, that is an ugly post. Sorry, all. :( I obviously didn't think this through.

again i dont disagree completely, all im saying is i think if its not done by a professional the criteria is to vague


with the skewed perception , what i mean is for example, there is a current post "does adhd have to do with trouble dating" a lot of people agreed

so in an online adhd self diagnostic test should there be a criteria of "often has trouble dating"


im not trying to say your are not autistic and frankly its not my business

i just think these online tests are so vague its gonna get a lot of people in a frenzy

and when i said a skewed viewpoint, read a sam vaknin book and you will see exactly what i mean

if people dx themselves based on his writing the world would consist of 80% narcissists

thanks for the other info though

what defines a meltdown?

and what do you mean ugly post , its a lot prettier than most of mine

daveddd
12-23-10, 07:49 PM
Why do you say it's ugly? These are the things I had written in response but then my computer dumped before they could post to the thread.

No one outgrows ADHD and Autism either, we just learn ways of coping and adapting. We learn the rules of society and try to fit in.

About 1 in 20 people have some degree of Sensory Processing Disorder, the prevalence is much higher in those who have ADHD, Autism and Fragile X syndrome.

I have Sensory Processing Disorder. Lights are too bright, noises are too loud or annoying or both, smells are too strong and make me sick (migraines and allergic reactions), I can only wear a few types of fabric and shoes, I tend to eat the same things and don't usually care for anything new.

Here is a listing of common traits of Sensory Processing Disorder. (http://www.spdfoundation.net/redflags.html)

well the adult list describes adhd

is that because its often comorbid or is it a separate disorder and how would it be differentiated from adhd

Fortune
12-23-10, 07:57 PM
Why do you say it's ugly? These are the things I had written in response but then my computer dumped before they could post to the thread.

No one outgrows ADHD and Autism either, we just learn ways of coping and adapting. We learn the rules of society and try to fit in.

Formatting was ugly.

And yeah, i didn't like the term outgrow. It's like...ADHDers tend to be bad at self-assessment into the early 20s, but get much better at it by 30, you know? It's not outgrowing it, it's a developmental delay. Plus the ability to learn skills to adapt.

As I understand it, SPD is not typically by itself but comorbid?

Fortune
12-23-10, 08:14 PM
again i dont disagree completely, all im saying is i think if its not done by a professional the criteria is to vague

with the skewed perception , what i mean is for example, there is a current post "does adhd have to do with trouble dating" a lot of people agreed

so in an online adhd self diagnostic test should there be a criteria of "often has trouble dating"

im not trying to say your are not autistic and frankly its not my business

i just think these online tests are so vague its gonna get a lot of people in a frenzy

and when i said a skewed viewpoint, read a sam vaknin book and you will see exactly what i mean

if people dx themselves based on his writing the world would consist of 80% narcissists

thanks for the other info though

what defines a meltdown?

and what do you mean ugly post , its a lot prettier than most of mine

ugly formatting. Splitting your post up line by line to reply to it.

Okay: He doesn't get questions from forum posts, he uses research to determine what might make good questions. I am not sure on his methods but I've read some of his commentary on what he does. He updates in a methodical and meticulous manner, as far as I can tell, not just when the mood strikes him.

An online ADHD screening test would not probably not ask about dating. If anything, I suspect ADHDers are fine at dating, it's the long-term relationships where most friction develops. Research might find ways that ADHDers date that might be indicative, but there are probably other, more easily identified things (like the ADHD quiz you can find online, the one that probably tells you "serious ADHD likely!"

Online tests aren't diagnoses. The AQ, for example, is a screening tool (along with the EQ/SQ) that points to the possibility. Like, 80% of autistic people who took the test during the research scored 32 or above, right? That means scoring 32 or above is an indicator, but it's not a diagnosis. The aspie quiz is not a diagnosis, and I think people use it for more than simply determining whether or not they have AS.

Whether or not I am autistic wasn't a topic I was trying to cover. I don't expect anyone on a forum could tell me either way unless I give them extensive information I do not tend to discuss in public. And even then it's a guess, you know?

A meltdown is sensory or emotional overload that results in extreme emotional reactions - in children they can be mischaracterized as temper tantrums. It's not strictly an autistic thing, but autistic people experience it far more frequently.

I think there's a kind of stereotype that people just take the test and decide they have something, but I think fracturedstory pointed out somewhere else that people who have AS can spend a lot of time trying to figure out and prove to themselves whether or not they have it, rather than simply taking a test. Admittedly, some people do start asking after they take the tests? But I suspect most don't really want to have it.

daveddd
12-23-10, 08:21 PM
ugly formatting. Splitting your post up line by line to reply to it.

Okay: He doesn't get questions from forum posts, he uses research to determine what might make good questions. I am not sure on his methods but I've read some of his commentary on what he does. He updates in a methodical and meticulous manner, as far as I can tell, not just when the mood strikes him.

An online ADHD screening test would not probably not ask about dating. If anything, I suspect ADHDers are fine at dating, it's the long-term relationships where most friction develops. Research might find ways that ADHDers date that might be indicative, but there are probably other, more easily identified things (like the ADHD quiz you can find online, the one that probably tells you "serious ADHD likely!"

Online tests aren't diagnoses. The AQ, for example, is a screening tool (along with the EQ/SQ) that points to the possibility. Like, 80% of autistic people who took the test during the research scored 32 or above, right? That means scoring 32 or above is an indicator, but it's not a diagnosis. The aspie quiz is not a diagnosis, and I think people use it for more than simply determining whether or not they have AS.

Whether or not I am autistic wasn't a topic I was trying to cover. I don't expect anyone on a forum could tell me either way unless I give them extensive information I do not tend to discuss in public. And even then it's a guess, you know?

A meltdown is sensory or emotional overload that results in extreme emotional reactions - in children they can be mischaracterized as temper tantrums. It's not strictly an autistic thing, but autistic people experience it far more frequently.

I think there's a kind of stereotype that people just take the test and decide they have something, but I think fracturedstory pointed out somewhere else that people who have AS can spend a lot of time trying to figure out and prove to themselves whether or not they have it, rather than simply taking a test. Admittedly, some people do start asking after they take the tests? But I suspect most don't really want to have it.

i could probably go either way

oops on the you being autistic things, must have meshed your posts with someone elses

i just keep going because i like debating and if everyone agreed on everything , the conversations would end a lot faster and i would be bored

Fortune
12-23-10, 08:34 PM
i could probably go either way

oops on the you being autistic things, must have meshed your posts with someone elses

i just keep going because i like debating and if everyone agreed on everything , the conversations would end a lot faster and i would be bored

I did say I have strong suspicions, and mentioned that my first post in this thread didn't reflect that. But I mean this exchange with you isn't about whether I have it or not, I don't think.

I enjoy back and forth on forums, especially talking about things that I am deeply interested in...

daveddd
12-23-10, 08:42 PM
just read a good differential on social anxiety and autism

for me ,

social anxiety- person realizes fear is completely irrational

aspergers-fear based off of inadequate social skills therefore not an irrational fear

i personally fit SA, my social skills are pretty good to good with familiarity /meds/a little bit of beer

not saying those things make my skills good, they just lower my anxiety enough to use them

Fortune
12-23-10, 09:48 PM
I don't think I actually have very many symptoms of social anxiety. I had issues with socializing and I was diagnosed with GAD so I lumped them together and assumed I had it, but to be honest looking at the actual criteria, most of them don't fit well.

I mean, like this: It does take me a bit to be comfortable around people, but I don't mind being the center of attention (although I do not typically seek it). My issues with going to a social occasion tend to revolve around the disruption to my normal routine (I'd like to do the stuff I normally do), arranging the transportation, getting everything in order, and worrying about worst case scenarios. I actually want to socialize, although preferably on my own terms and not by other people trying to set my schedule or interfere with it.

Okay, phones. I hate talking on phones. But I can talk on them when I need to.

daveddd
12-23-10, 09:49 PM
i finally took the quiz , i scored likely not autistic

but in my opinion that quiz is a magnet for false positives

Fortune
12-23-10, 09:58 PM
What is your basis for that opinion? I mean, are there questions that stand out to you as leading to a false positive? Did you read the full PDF at the end?

I don't mean to sound argumentative, but I would like to hear your reasoning.

fracturedstory
12-24-10, 02:25 AM
if the quiz is made by someone who is autistic, i doubt they can completely distinguish aspie symptoms from other co morbids or simple personality traits, they update it constantly? every time their mood changes?

its like sam vaknin , he takes every feeling he ever had and makes it a "symptom " of narcissism

i see a lot of people who say they know several aspies who dont have several of the most prominent autistic features

its like me saying i know several adhd people without attention or hyperactivity symptoms
Oh shut up! People with autism know far more than you are giving them credit for.
I can tell what the difference between autism, AS, ADHD, ADHD-PI, ADHD-SCT, Bipolar, etc is.

If you don't think you have it then why are you even posting in this thread? You don't have it. Great. By the way I'm not just talking to you.


This might be an overinterpretation of what fracturedstory said. My own observation is that there's a tendency for people to suggest that certain traits exist in all autistic people, and perceive those traits as defining (such as the idea that autistic people do not have theory of mind or lack empathy) and enduring, even though it's autistic children who have the most trouble with ToM and many grow out of it as they get older and their brains develop.

Or that for many people with AS, sensory problems can be more debilitating than social problems. Or that some can learn to socialize appropriately (although it requires more processing to read people than NTs need to do).
Yes exactly. There are symptoms that are not core diagnosable symptoms. Currently you only have to fit a certain number of criteria.
The autism spectrum is very broad.

Being able to read facial expressions and not being hyperactive or having attention problems are completely unrelated because those two symptoms are core diagnosable symptoms.

fracturedstory
12-24-10, 03:05 AM
My doctor even said to me maybe my seizures were actually autism. Haw haw haw.
Now I can definitely tell and feel the difference between those two.

daveddd
12-24-10, 10:19 AM
What is your basis for that opinion? I mean, are there questions that stand out to you as leading to a false positive? Did you read the full PDF at the end?

I don't mean to sound argumentative, but I would like to hear your reasoning.

if we have the time one day i could easily go through it question by question and show you how i formed this OPINION


he is not a medical professional , therefore my opinion is as valid as his

daveddd
12-24-10, 10:25 AM
Oh shut up! People with autism know far more than you are giving them credit for.
I can tell what the difference between autism, AS, ADHD, ADHD-PI, ADHD-SCT, Bipolar, etc is.

If you don't think you have it then why are you even posting in this thread? You don't have it. Great. By the way I'm not just talking to you.


Yes exactly. There are symptoms that are not core diagnosable symptoms. Currently you only have to fit a certain number of criteria.
The autism spectrum is very broad.

Being able to read facial expressions and not being hyperactive or having attention problems are completely unrelated because those two symptoms are core diagnosable symptoms.

because it interests me, and i once fell into the trap of diagnosing myself with every condition i read about

my quote wasnt at all about autistic people in general, it was about anyone s self awareness

i just had a thread asking questions about what symptoms where adhd and what wasnt

if you think about it, anyone taking that quiz with ocd, social phobia, depression, adhd, is likely to score towards autistic


autism is far more rare than any of those disorders, and i think a quiz like that could make people talk themselves into being autistic


dont know why you are upset, you seem very smart, you should be able to see both sides

daveddd
12-24-10, 11:05 AM
oh and to fractured story

you asked why i was here, im pretty sure the opening sentence of the thread started off with exactly what im talkin about

Fortune
12-24-10, 12:59 PM
if we have the time one day i could easily go through it question by question and show you how i formed this OPINION

he is not a medical professional , therefore my opinion is as valid as his

I know I can contact the person who made the test and ask him about his methods, ask about specific questions and he will explain his reasoning. It was fairly easy to find some of it with google. Right now, I know nothing about your opinion, except that you feel that two of the questions don't have any bearing on ASD, and I am still not sure why you feel those two questions have no bearing on ASD beyond the possibility that they're not listed in the diagnostic criteria.

Do you feel that people are diagnosing themselves as AS in droves based on this test? Is this your concern? The people in this thread and the AQ thread who scored high tended to explain why they're not autistic. I don't think there are droves of people who are looking to be diagnosed as AS if they don't already have reason to think something's there, you know? And for them a quiz won't be enough to tell them either way.

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:06 PM
I know I can contact the person who made the test and ask him about his methods, ask about specific questions and he will explain his reasoning. It was fairly easy to find some of it with google. Right now, I know nothing about your opinion, except that you feel that two of the questions don't have any bearing on ASD, and I am still not sure why you feel those two questions have no bearing on ASD beyond the possibility that they're not listed in the diagnostic criteria.

Do you feel that people are diagnosing themselves as AS in droves based on this test? Is this your concern?

no concern what so ever

simply , i think the test is vague and can cause certain people (not saying you) to attempt to force themselves in to categories they dont really fit

the original post to me (not to you) seems that he/she is really stretching to fit themselves into each category of criteria

again, maybe every single person who scores autistic on this test is autistic


i am just offering a different viewpoint , i am not trying to offend anybody or change their viewpoint, nor will you change mine

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:08 PM
I know I can contact the person who made the test and ask him about his methods, ask about specific questions and he will explain his reasoning. It was fairly easy to find some of it with google. Right now, I know nothing about your opinion, except that you feel that two of the questions don't have any bearing on ASD, and I am still not sure why you feel those two questions have no bearing on ASD beyond the possibility that they're not listed in the diagnostic criteria.

Do you feel that people are diagnosing themselves as AS in droves based on this test? Is this your concern?

and it is far, far more than two questions

the biggest issue with these test are the laypersons (such as myself) ability to differentiate a trait, from a life impairing symptom

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:11 PM
and if you read MOST (sometimes im grumpy) of my posts i am very willing to accept peoples opinions on what is ailing me

sorry about 3 posts i forget about the edit button

Fortune
12-24-10, 01:27 PM
because it interests me, and i once fell into the trap of diagnosing myself with every condition i read about

my quote wasnt at all about autistic people in general, it was about anyone s self awareness

i just had a thread asking questions about what symptoms where adhd and what wasnt

if you think about it, anyone taking that quiz with ocd, social phobia, depression, adhd, is likely to score towards autistic


autism is far more rare than any of those disorders, and i think a quiz like that could make people talk themselves into being autistic


dont know why you are upset, you seem very smart, you should be able to see both sides

Do you feel people who are investigating whether they may or may not be autistic are self-diagnosing themselves with every condition they read about?

Your quote seemed very specific, and you made several assumptions about how the quiz has been developed over time - easily researched assumptions.

Of course this forum has a lot of threads about what qualifies as an ADHD symptom and what does not, but this does not mean that everyone who reads them thinks that everything is a symptom. I've asked questions about some things that I realized at the time probably were not, but I needed to see if other people knew what I was talking about for other reasons.

The quiz does have several symptoms that overlap with other conditions, this has been pointed out. Do you seriously think people are taking this quiz and thinking "Oh, damn, I'm autistic!" I think most people take quizzes like this and say, "Oh, I'm not autistic," and they're probably right. I don't think people in general want to be autistic, want to be seen as autistic. Autism has a pretty strong stigma, a lot stronger than ADHD, and even people who think they might be autistic have to contend with that within themselves, let alone from other people. I think people are much more likely to diagnose themselves with something like social phobias or depression.

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:36 PM
i also ask about traits of mine and if they are related to adhd

i know you research alot, and one of the biggest things i find is that psych professionals (no way do i consider myself one) disagree totally on what symptoms are contributed to what quite often

all im saying is based on this list i formed a personal opinion that from what ive read (by legit professionals) sway me to believe that this quiz has no merit

and it does not concern me whether or not you believe that or not

you are entitled to your beliefs

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:40 PM
and maybe i should of been clearer that i dont think these CANT be contributed to autism

i just think most of these things dont add up to

"you are most likely an aspie "

Fortune
12-24-10, 01:40 PM
no concern what so ever

simply , i think the test is vague and can cause certain people (not saying you) to attempt to force themselves in to categories they dont really fit

the original post to me (not to you) seems that he/she is really stretching to fit themselves into each category of criteria

again, maybe every single person who scores autistic on this test is autistic

i am just offering a different viewpoint , i am not trying to offend anybody or change their viewpoint, nor will you change mine

But most people are probably far more likely to say "I don't fit." Have you seen the other comments in this thread?

The original post may be stretching? I don't know. It sounded to me like the OP actually wanted to be convinced he doesn't fit.

I'm not taking this discussion personally.

Every single person who scores as aspie on this quiz is probably not autistic.

I don't understand your viewpoint, and you're holding most of it close to your chest. I don't have any understanding of why you say this is a magnet for false diagnoses when you have not explained this more than a little bit.

and it is far, far more than two questions

the biggest issue with these test are the laypersons (such as myself) ability to differentiate a trait, from a life impairing symptom

I didn't say it was only two questions. I said you have only mentioned two questions.

I don't think the majority of questions on the AQ are asking "does this impair your life" but rather "is this true for you?" and it doesn't seem to imply much about impairment at all. I've taken the PAI and it's similar in that it simply asks "You experience/have experienced/do X?" and you say whether you agree or disagree or how strongly, but the questions don't really imply severity or impairment, just "is this something that's happened to/with you?"

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:42 PM
But most people are probably far more likely to say "I don't fit." Have you seen the other comments in this thread?

The original post may be stretching? I don't know. It sounded to me like the OP actually wanted to be convinced he doesn't fit.

Every single person who scores as aspie on this quiz is probably not autistic.

I don't understand your viewpoint, and you're holding most of it close to your chest. I don't have any understanding of why you say this is a magnet for false diagnoses when you have not explained this more than a little bit.



I didn't say it was only two questions. I said you have only mentioned two questions.

I don't think the majority of questions on the AQ are asking "does this impair your life" but rather "is this true for you?" and it doesn't seem to imply much about impairment at all. I've taken the PAI and it's similar in that it simply asks "You experience/have experienced/do X?" and you say whether you agree or disagree or how strongly, but the questions don't really imply severity or impairment, just "is this something that's happened to/with you?"

yes, it takes a pro to decide whether or not these are traits or life impairing symptoms

and thats what makes something a diagnosis

that is stated by a ton of people on here regarding adhd

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:45 PM
and maybe i should of been clearer that i dont think these CANT be contributed to autism

i just think most of these things dont add up to

"you are most likely an aspie "

this is what i failed miserably to communicate earlier

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:46 PM
and i also feel that "quizzes " like this downplay the severity of these types of disorders and the people truly suffering from them

Fortune
12-24-10, 01:49 PM
i also ask about traits of mine and if they are related to adhd

i know you research alot, and one of the biggest things i find is that psych professionals (no way do i consider myself one) disagree totally on what symptoms are contributed to what quite often

all im saying is based on this list i formed a personal opinion that from what ive read (by legit professionals) sway me to believe that this quiz has no merit

and it does not concern me whether or not you believe that or not

you are entitled to your beliefs

Then why are you even discussing it if you refuse to discuss it? Why say something like that and refuse to elaborate? That isn't a discussion.

and maybe i should of been clearer that i dont think these CANT be contributed to autism

i just think most of these things dont add up to

"you are most likely an aspie "

And why do you think this? This is all I have tried to ask.

daveddd
12-24-10, 01:51 PM
Then why are you even discussing it if you refuse to discuss it? Why say something like that and refuse to elaborate? That isn't a discussion.



And why do you think this? This is all I have tried to ask.

i thought i said why i think this

because most if not all of these "symptoms" can be attributed to other disorders

Mignon
12-24-10, 01:54 PM
and i also feel that "quizzes " like this downplay the severity of these types of disorders and the people truly suffering from them

Something as abstract as a quiz can't downplay the severity of any type of disorder. People can though.

Fortune
12-24-10, 01:59 PM
yes, it takes a pro to decide whether or not these are traits or life impairing symptoms

and thats what makes something a diagnosis

that is stated by a ton of people on here regarding adhd

Fascinating. I've found that if someone comes here with the suspicion that they have ADHD and sound like they have ADHD that people are really supportive about that and are unlikely to tell them that how much they can't really know until a doctor tells them the ways in which they're experiencing impairment in major areas of life.

Like if I'd needed a doctor before I got support here, I don't think I would actually be where I am now, I'd still be in limbo.

And even people who may not have ADHD may have something serious and may be in need of support without having a doctor tell them that they're experiencing an impairment.

Why is it that only a doctor can tell you that you have impairments? If anything, I think people tend to underestimate their impairments.

and i also feel that "quizzes " like this downplay the severity of these types of disorders and the people truly suffering from them

Why do you think this? I think that a large number of people who take these quizzes actually already know they are on the autistic spectrum, and I am sure they can certainly speak for themselves as to whether these quizzes downplay their lives. I mean, I don't think they're using it for diagnosis, but for assessment.

I dislike talking about people with disabilities "suffering" with their conditions. I think this leads to a host of assumptions that may prove inaccurate. Does it mean I think people don't suffer? No, but I disagree with defining their suffering on the basis of a particular diagnosis.

Fortune
12-24-10, 02:06 PM
i thought i said why i think this

because most if not all of these "symptoms" can be attributed to other disorders

Okay, but most if not all of these... these questions aren't even really strictly about symptoms, they're about a wide spectrum of things from coping mechanisms to habits to how you deal with your hobbies. And yes, some symptoms.

These questions can be applied to other symptoms (and the author even says so), but if you score high on this quiz, you're scoring high on a constellation of traits that are associated strongly with autistic people. This answer does not make sense because the quiz itself is not geared toward any of those other conditions, it simply overlaps.

I made this statement about overlap in my first post in the thread but on further reflection I didn't think it made as much sense because the quiz itself is geared toward autism, not OCD or social phobias, or ADHD. Those can impact the score, but I do not think they can impact the score to such a great degree.

daveddd
12-24-10, 02:34 PM
here is one thing that may support my reasoning

my best friends brother is a professionally diagnosed autistic

things like the eye contact thing, his inability to maintain eye contact is far more severe, than say someone like me who is uncomfortable with it because of SA

so, things like the quiz make it hard to distinguish that and can be misleading


i dont know how impacting things like this are to people on this forum

but if i didnt know it would fool me

thats all, that my opinion

i would try more but i have to leave for a family event

Lunacie
12-24-10, 03:06 PM
i thought i said why i think this

because most if not all of these "symptoms" can be attributed to other disorders

here is one thing that may support my reasoning

my best friends brother is a professionally diagnosed autistic

things like the eye contact thing, his inability to maintain eye contact is far more severe, than say someone like me who is uncomfortable with it because of SA

so, things like the quiz make it hard to distinguish that and can be misleading


i dont know how impacting things like this are to people on this forum

but if i didnt know it would fool me

thats all, that my opinion

i would try more but i have to leave for a family event

Autism is called a "spectrum disorder" because there is such a wide variety of traits associated with it, and I don't believe there is any one trait that everyone who is diagnosed with autism has. Not even the difficulty with making eye contact.

My granddaughter has never had much problem with eye contact but she met enough of the other criteria and displayed enough of the other traits for us to be certain she was somewhere on the spectrum, and to have two therapists and a child development specialist confirm it.

As our district autism specialist (school district that is) likes to say, "If you've met one person with autism, then you've met just one person with autism." You simply can't generalize what other autists will be like from what you see in that one person.

Now, I have seen some online tests that strongly encourage one to see a doctor for a proper diagnosis if they think their scores indicate the possiblilty that they have a mental disorder. I wish this author had something like that one the results page as well.

Fortune
12-24-10, 03:10 PM
here is one thing that may support my reasoning

my best friends brother is a professionally diagnosed autistic

things like the eye contact thing, his inability to maintain eye contact is far more severe, than say someone like me who is uncomfortable with it because of SA

so, things like the quiz make it hard to distinguish that and can be misleading

Do you think eye contact is exactly the same for everyone on the spectrum? I don't know either way, but I am curious. My suspicion is that it would be more or less severe from person to person because it is a spectrum.

If you take every question in isolation, it's easy to say it - by itself - is misleading.

Kind of weird: I find that I can't actually remember much of anything about what I was looking at during most conversations.

Velvetdragon
12-25-10, 09:55 AM
Asked why I'm posting in this thread if I'm not an aspie, this thread never said, "Post here if you're an aspie." So I thought everyone was welcome. The OP said she was worried because she scored high on this test she might be an aspie. I think the variety of responses show that it's definitely a strong chance but the test is not diagnostic and there *are* other possibilities.

I'm confused, do some people think that because I (or others) scored "You are probably an aspie" on this test, I am even though I don't feel it fits? Some people seem very defensive about people feeling they aren't autistic and it confuses me. To the point now I'm worried. Ha ha ha. I start second guessing myself even though I feel I, too, can tell the difference between ADD, SA, SPD, OCD, autism, etc.

daveddd
12-25-10, 10:20 AM
Asked why I'm posting in this thread if I'm not an aspie, this thread never said, "Post here if you're an aspie." So I thought everyone was welcome. The OP said she was worried because she scored high on this test she might be an aspie. I think the variety of responses show that it's definitely a strong chance but the test is not diagnostic and there *are* other possibilities.

I'm confused, do some people think that because I (or others) scored "You are probably an aspie" on this test, I am even though I don't feel it fits? Some people seem very defensive about people feeling they aren't autistic and it confuses me. To the point now I'm worried. Ha ha ha. I start second guessing myself even though I feel I, too, can tell the difference between ADD, SA, SPD, OCD, autism, etc.

yea, i never tried saying anyone was or wasnt autistic (not saying you said that)


im just saying that quiz is skewed in my opinion

we all can be ruled autistic , until you know some autistic people , then people will understand the difference

Lunacie
12-25-10, 11:54 AM
yea, i never tried saying anyone was or wasnt autistic (not saying you said that)


im just saying that quiz is skewed in my opinion

we all can be ruled autistic , until you know some autistic people , then people will understand the difference

Our first therapist knew some autistic people, including his own son, yet he still hesitated to say that my granddaughter is also autistic. As I said before, there are so many traits associated with the very broad Autism Spectrum that two people who are not very similar at all can both be diagnosed with autism.

If you see someone with the traits you're familiar with as being part of the Autism Spectrum, you'll find it easy to identify them. Those who exhibit different traits may still be identified as autistic but not by you.

I thought that by making the quiz so large, it covered the majority of traits that are usually associated with Autism, more than just the usual half-dozen that people usually think of.

Fortune
12-25-10, 12:23 PM
Asked why I'm posting in this thread if I'm not an aspie, this thread never said, "Post here if you're an aspie." So I thought everyone was welcome. The OP said she was worried because she scored high on this test she might be an aspie. I think the variety of responses show that it's definitely a strong chance but the test is not diagnostic and there *are* other possibilities.

I'm confused, do some people think that because I (or others) scored "You are probably an aspie" on this test, I am even though I don't feel it fits? Some people seem very defensive about people feeling they aren't autistic and it confuses me. To the point now I'm worried. Ha ha ha. I start second guessing myself even though I feel I, too, can tell the difference between ADD, SA, SPD, OCD, autism, etc.

I don't think you're AS.

I am not defensive.

I misunderstood what you were saying about interests, as I have seen similar statements made about other autistic traits that were applied liberally to adults, and I assumed you were doing the same. When you clarified you meant the interests you had as a child, I realized this. As I said in a PM, I'm sorry for making that assumption.

Some of the explanations that I've read in this thread did sound defensive about the possibility of having AS. I think fracturedstory reacted to that.

yea, i never tried saying anyone was or wasnt autistic (not saying you said that)

im just saying that quiz is skewed in my opinion

we all can be ruled autistic , until you know some autistic people , then people will understand the difference

I know several autistic people. They seem to be less concerned about form over function (or is it style over substance?) when it comes to this sort of thing. Possibly because they've had to deal with these assumptions that "being autistic means you must be exactly like other autistic people in one or more particular ways or it's not really true." Sometimes these assumptions complicate getting needed diagnoses or assistance.

You can't make judgments based on what one autistic person does, though. If you say "this is misleading because this one autistic guy I know is like this" you're not talking about diagnostic criteria, you're talking about one guy and then suggesting that all autistic people must be like him, even if only in one way. That's not very insightful or useful.

Given that people who are on the spectrum typically score high on the quiz (and I mean many take it just to see their scores), you really need more data to demonstrate how it fails at what it's intended to do. Otherwise, you just sound contrary.

daveddd
12-25-10, 09:40 PM
I don't think you're AS.

I am not defensive.

I misunderstood what you were saying about interests, as I have seen similar statements made about other autistic traits that were applied liberally to adults, and I assumed you were doing the same. When you clarified you meant the interests you had as a child, I realized this. As I said in a PM, I'm sorry for making that assumption.

Some of the explanations that I've read in this thread did sound defensive about the possibility of having AS. I think fracturedstory reacted to that.



I know several autistic people. They seem to be less concerned about form over function (or is it style over substance?) when it comes to this sort of thing. Possibly because they've had to deal with these assumptions that "being autistic means you must be exactly like other autistic people in one or more particular ways or it's not really true." Sometimes these assumptions complicate getting needed diagnoses or assistance.

You can't make judgments based on what one autistic person does, though. If you say "this is misleading because this one autistic guy I know is like this" you're not talking about diagnostic criteria, you're talking about one guy and then suggesting that all autistic people must be like him, even if only in one way. That's not very insightful or useful.

Given that people who are on the spectrum typically score high on the quiz (and I mean many take it just to see their scores), you really need more data to demonstrate how it fails at what it's intended to do. Otherwise, you just sound contrary.

you agreed on my point with eye contact(not that it is not autism , but some could mistake it)

i can go through pretty much every question and tear it down


again , im not stating that none of these traits arent autism, just sayin all can also be attributed elsewhere , mostly adhd

and some are basic human traits

you said yourself in another thread that autism has nothing to do with personality , yet several of these questions relate to that


the person i know(i know hes not all people) his interest in drawing is so intense he doesnt acknowledge someone standing next to him while engaging in it

people with ocpd, adhd, anxiety, depression all have that, what did we learn that day? perservation whatever? or merely hobbies

once again this can be misconstrued


not that this bothers me, i guess i found out from this thread there are autistics who are great in social situations, have no obsessions , have plenty of empathy , and so forth, thats not my point


just that the power of the mind is so intense it can force itself into any trait


this is just a theory of mine, it has nothing to do with trying to prove or disprove any specific persons difference


lunacie said 1 in 20 people have sensory issues

1 in what 10,000 have autism, yet this is one of the most linked traits

Lunacie
12-25-10, 10:24 PM
Actually, statistics indicate that almost 1 in every 100 kids in the US has been diagnosed with Autism.

Compare that if you will to the statistics showing that about 9 in every 100 kids in the US have been diagnosed with ADHD.

Yes, as I mentioned before, sensory processing disorder is much more often cormorbid with Autism and ADHD than in the neuro-typical population.

daveddd
12-25-10, 10:26 PM
Actually, statistics indicate that almost 1 in every 100 kids in the US has been diagnosed with Autism.

Compare that if you will to the statistics showing that about 9 in every 100 kids in the US have been diagnosed with ADHD.

Yes, as I mentioned before, sensory processing disorder is much more often cormorbid with Autism and ADHD than in the neuro-typical population.

oops sorry then, i thought autism was much lower than 1 percent

Fortune
12-25-10, 10:53 PM
you agreed on my point with eye contact(not that it is not autism , but some could mistake it)

i can go through pretty much every question and tear it down


again , im not stating that none of these traits arent autism, just sayin all can also be attributed elsewhere , mostly adhd

and some are basic human traits

Of course you could go through every question and tear it down, but the question isn't whether you can tear it down, but whether you can take the quiz as a whole and say that the pattern of answers is or is not indicative of autism. If you can say "these questions can relate to social phobia" or ADHD or OCD, or other conditions, what you end up with generally insufficient indication for any of these conditions. Just being able to say "This could be a symptom or a sign of two or more conditions" is not by itself tearing a question apart.

The problem I have with what you are saying is that you are treating each question as a discrete unit that has no relationship to the other questions on the quiz, or specifically the other questions in their particular subgroup -these subgroups defining the shape of the graph you have at the end.


the person i know(i know hes not all people) his interest in drawing is so intense he doesnt acknowledge someone standing next to him while engaging in it

people with ocpd, adhd, anxiety, depression all have that, what did we learn that day? perservation whatever? or merely hobbies

once again this can be misconstruedAgain, taking one piece out of the whole. This one trait is indicative of multiple things. But when you combine it with difficulties with eye contact, a need for routines, difficulty reading body language, stimming, and so on, this creates a pattern. These things are part of a category of traits that as a group are associated with autism.

Do you see why I find it so difficult to take what you're saying at face value? I'm not even arguing that the aspie quiz can diagnose anyone of anything, and have in fact said that it does not diagnose at all. But what I do think it does, and I believe this is borne out with empirical usage, is identify a constellation of traits that people who have AS tend to show.

Also, your comment on human behavior? Every one of ADHD's symptoms is a part of normal human behavior (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93678). It is simply how extreme and frequent these are for ADHDers that makes them impairing and thus a diagnosis. Autistic traits are also a part of normal human behavior, but again, it's the degree to which they impact autistic people that make autism a diagnosis.

It seems to me that you're arguing a slippery slope, that non-autistic people will take this quiz in droves and fool themselves into think they're autistic, into thinking that whatever traits they have are symptomatic. I don't think this is the case. If anything I think undiagnosed Aspies are more likely to downplay and not even be aware of their symptoms or behaviors as unusual than anyone else is likely to mistake their own behavior as symptomatic.

I do think there are some people who take a quiz or they get to university and suddenly have problems, or whatever, and they decide that they must have something and rush around to confirm it. I don't know how many there are, but it really comes down to this: If they don't have an official diagnosis, does it matter? And if they seek one and don't have anything, then there's a good chance they'll be told they don't have anything. And if they seek one and find out they have something else? This is a positive outcome because they can get treatment. And if they really have the disorder in question? They can be treated for that. And in both of the previous cases, perhaps seek accommodations and have a better chance to graduate (if in university). I don't see the downside.

daveddd
12-25-10, 11:01 PM
Of course you could go through every question and tear it down, but the question isn't whether you can tear it down, but whether you can take the quiz as a whole and say that the pattern of answers is or is not indicative of autism. If you can say "these questions can relate to social phobia" or ADHD or OCD, or other conditions, what you end up with generally insufficient indication for any of these conditions. Just being able to say "This could be a symptom or a sign of two or more conditions" is not by itself tearing a question apart.

The problem I have with what you are saying is that you are treating each question as a discrete unit that has no relationship to the other questions on the quiz, or specifically the other questions in their particular subgroup -these subgroups defining the shape of the graph you have at the end.


Again, taking one piece out of the whole. This one trait is indicative of multiple things. But when you combine it with difficulties with eye contact, a need for routines, difficulty reading body language, stimming, and so on, this creates a pattern. These things are part of a category of traits that as a group are associated with autism.

Do you see why I find it so difficult to take what you're saying at face value? I'm not even arguing that the aspie quiz can diagnose anyone of anything, and have in fact said that it does not diagnose at all. But what I do think it does, and I believe this is borne out with empirical usage, is identify a constellation of traits that people who have AS tend to show.

Also, your comment on human behavior? Every one of ADHD's symptoms is a part of normal human behavior (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93678). It is simply how extreme and frequent these are for ADHDers that makes them impairing and thus a diagnosis. Autistic traits are also a part of normal human behavior, but again, it's the degree to which they impact autistic people that make autism a diagnosis.

It seems to me that you're arguing a slippery slope, that non-autistic people will take this quiz in droves and fool themselves into think they're autistic, into thinking that whatever traits they have are symptomatic. I don't think this is the case. If anything I think undiagnosed Aspies are more likely to downplay and not even be aware of their symptoms or behaviors as unusual than anyone else is likely to mistake their own behavior as symptomatic.

I do think there are some people who take a quiz or they get to university and suddenly have problems, or whatever, and they decide that they must have something and rush around to confirm it. I don't know how many there are, but it really comes down to this: If they don't have an official diagnosis, does it matter? And if they seek one and don't have anything, then there's a good chance they'll be told they don't have anything. And if they seek one and find out they have something else? This is a positive outcome because they can get treatment. And if they really have the disorder in question? They can be treated for that. And in both of the previous cases, perhaps seek accommodations and have a better chance to graduate (if in university). I don't see the downside.


im not arguing that people are doing this in droves


like you just stated this is all normal behavior to an extreme


how are we to drawn the line on this extreme, based on a quiz



i wouldnt care if 99% of the world were self diagnosed "aspies" tomorrow because of the quiz


but, someone who is having issues , similar to but not autistic issues, someone searching desperately for an answer

can go to the doctor after taking this quiz and leave dxed an autistic when they arent

Lunacie
12-25-10, 11:08 PM
im not arguing that people are doing this in droves


like you just stated this is all normal behavior to an extreme


how are we to drawn the line on this extreme, based on a quiz



i wouldnt care if 99% of the world were self diagnosed "aspies" tomorrow because of the quiz


but, someone who is having issues , similar to but not autistic issues, someone searching desperately for an answer

can go to the doctor after taking this quiz and leave dxed an autistic when they arent

Um... are you saying that if someone takes in a questionaire like this to show the doctor, that they will get a diagnosis of autism even if it's not accurate?

Gotta admit I don't have a lot of faith in doctors in general, but I don't see a lot of people being misdiagnosed with autism when they have something else.

Often doctors will start by saying someone has depression or anxiety and begin by treating that. When the traits persist, they may begin treating for ADHD. When that isn't effective or causes more problems than it solves, then the doctors look at something like Bipolar or Autism. I just don't see that Autism is the first thing a doctor is going to go with.

daveddd
12-25-10, 11:17 PM
Um... are you saying that if someone takes in a questionaire like this to show the doctor, that they will get a diagnosis of autism even if it's not accurate?

Gotta admit I don't have a lot of faith in doctors in general, but I don't see a lot of people being misdiagnosed with autism when they have something else.

Often doctors will start by saying someone has depression or anxiety and begin by treating that. When the traits persist, they may begin treating for ADHD. When that isn't effective or causes more problems than it solves, then the doctors look at something like Bipolar or Autism. I just don't see that Autism is the first thing a doctor is going to go with.

nope, im saying someone can go into a doctors office after taking a quiz like that convinced they are an aspie

therefore emphasizing the traits they learned in the quiz, leading the doctor not to look any further

ive never had doctors look much further than the symptoms ive emphasized


self realization along with outside input of other symptoms is what put me further along the diagnostic process


current dx-bipolar w/agitated depression/adhd/social anxiety ,is this correct ,no clue?

daveddd
12-25-10, 11:18 PM
you guys are taking me way out of context, like i hate this quiz


im just trying to throw a different viewpoint in

im aware that i can be quite difficult to understand clearly

Lunacie
12-25-10, 11:25 PM
nope, im saying someone can go into a doctors office after taking a quiz like that convinced they are an aspie

therefore emphasizing the traits they learned in the quiz, leading the doctor not to look any further

ive never had doctors look much further than the symptoms ive emphasized


self realization along with outside input of other symptoms is what put me further along the diagnostic process


current dx-bipolar w/agitated depression/adhd/social anxiety ,is this correct ,no clue?

you guys are taking me way out of context, like i hate this quiz


im just trying to throw a different viewpoint in

im aware that i can be quite difficult to understand clearly

Nope, I asked for clarification and added some thoughts on what it seemed you were saying.

Again, I don't have a lot of faith in doctors in general, but in my experience it's damn hard to get a proper diagnosis for Autism. I suspect it's even harder to get a diagnosis of Autism as an adult who was never diagnosed before.

Velvetdragon
12-26-10, 12:18 PM
Yes, as I mentioned before, sensory processing disorder is much more often cormorbid with Autism and ADHD than in the neuro-typical population.

Do you know the statistics regarding comorbidity between SPD and ADD vs AS? I'm curious! Like I said earlier in the thread, everyone assumes an ASD when they find out about my severe sensory issues.

Fortune
12-26-10, 01:34 PM
Do you know the statistics regarding comorbidity between SPD and ADD vs AS? I'm curious! Like I said earlier in the thread, everyone assumes an ASD when they find out about my severe sensory issues.

http://www.spdfoundation.net/otherdisorders.html


Scientists and parents alike are keenly interested in understanding the relationship between SPD and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD), a better-known condition that is frequently treated with medication. Although the neurological basis of the two disorders is different, children with the sensory-seeking subtype of SPD are especially likely to be diagnosed and treated for ADHD because their behaviors are similar to behaviors in children with Attention Deficit Disorder.

(http://www.spdfoundation.net/library.html#adhdspd)
Studies (http://www.spdfoundation.net/library.html#adhdspd) by SPD Foundation suggest that SPD and ADHD are unique disorders, each with its own distinct symptoms. This means that SPD is not simply a type of ADHD, and ADHD is not simply a subtype of SPD. However, an estimated 40 to 60 percent of the children with one disorder also have symptoms of the other.
Children whose Sensory Processing Disorder conforms to the under-responsivity subtype typically require a great deal of stimulation in order to become alert and active, a behavior often seen in children with autistic spectrum disorders. Meanwhile, other children with ASD have symptoms more similar to the over-responsive subtype of SPD. Because Autism and SPD both have over-responding and under-responding categories, they are sometimes mistaken for another.


The relationship between SPD and Autism is an area of great interest to scientists and families living with the condition. Studies (http://www.spdfoundation.net/library.html#autism) by the SPD Foundation suggest that more than three-quarters of children with autistic spectrum disorders have significant symptoms of Sensory Processing Disorder.



However, the reverse is not true. Most children with SPD do not have an autistic spectrum disorder! Our research suggests that the two conditions are distinct disorders just as SPD and ADHD are different disorders.

Not statistics, but maybe helpful.

I am not sure and have no scientific basis for this (just anecdotal), but it seems like autistic people describe more intense SPD experiences than ADHDers in general.

Fortune
12-26-10, 04:28 PM
im not arguing that people are doing this in droves

like you just stated this is all normal behavior to an extreme

how are we to drawn the line on this extreme, based on a quiz

i wouldnt care if 99% of the world were self diagnosed "aspies" tomorrow because of the quiz

but, someone who is having issues , similar to but not autistic issues, someone searching desperately for an answer

can go to the doctor after taking this quiz and leave dxed an autistic when they arent

Well, what kind of issues do you think would be confused for autism? I understand what you're saying about psychiatrists maybe not investigating symptoms, but my impression is that they tend to be more critical and skeptical of things like autism and ADHD.

Why do you feel that we are drawing the line to an extreme based on a quiz? My point about it all being human behavior to some degree was in response to your statement that indicated many people do some of these things. Of course many people do! But it's not one question or two or three or four or five, and while you can find people who do any of things, people who do a large number of these things tend to be autistic. I am not sure how many more ways I can say this.

you guys are taking me way out of context, like i hate this quiz

im just trying to throw a different viewpoint in

im aware that i can be quite difficult to understand clearly

No, I don't know whether you love or hate the quiz. I am trying to understand how isolating each question outside of its context and refuting it refutes the quiz as a whole.

Icecream
12-26-10, 05:46 PM
Are Asperger's and autististic spectrum disorders identified in formal psychological testing? I can relate to some of these, however, I have been through testing three times and it has never been stated. Would it show up as low GAF and would it affect my choice of partners in life? I have been married and dated people with 'sociopathic/anitsocial' disorders and failed to catch on until I am caught in a situation that is dificult to get out of. Maybe doubting myself made me try to overlook the fact that they actually stated they had testing that said they could 'kill their own mother with no remorse' and it really didn't phase me much.

fracturedstory
12-27-10, 08:07 PM
Asked why I'm posting in this thread if I'm not an aspie, this thread never said, "Post here if you're an aspie." So I thought everyone was welcome.
LOL you take everything I say so personally.
And you don't have to reply to that.
Or do. I really don't care.
People really mustn't keep it in mind how autistic I am.
It's always 'why would you say that?' or something sarcastic which I won't get or the way you replied. I get that a lot. I don't even know how to categorize it.
It still doesn't make any sense why people that don't think they have AS would post here. I mean what this thread really needs is someone who can help the OP understand if their symptoms are enough for an AS diagnosis.
Yes, everyone is free to do what they want.
And if you get all argumentative again I'm ignoring you. ADHD people get in rows a lot, hey? Every thread has some sort of disagreement that escalates.

I wonder if people here are aware by 2013 AS will be an old diagnosis? It will be dropped from the DSM V and either be called autism disorder or social communication disorder. I think the latter fits for many people that are still unsure if they have AS.
It's a good thing too. Because AS isn't a badge to wear proud. Not saying anyone here is but I know people that are like that. And they are so against the AS/ HFA merge because they don't want to be associated with us retards (their words, not mine).
So the merge will end a lot of stigma about autism, hopefully. And hopefully the NT's will realise that people with autism aren't all mute and screaming at the drop of the hat.
I scream when the hat is scratched with a finger nail.

fracturedstory
12-27-10, 08:12 PM
Are Asperger's and autististic spectrum disorders identified in formal psychological testing? I can relate to some of these, however, I have been through testing three times and it has never been stated. Would it show up as low GAF and would it affect my choice of partners in life? I have been married and dated people with 'sociopathic/anitsocial' disorders and failed to catch on until I am caught in a situation that is dificult to get out of. Maybe doubting myself made me try to overlook the fact that they actually stated they had testing that said they could 'kill their own mother with no remorse' and it really didn't phase me much.
I would say so. I always end up with hyper social arrogant b******.
I think we make easy targets for sociopaths.
Not sure where you are but in my country only a psychiatrist can diagnose ASD's.
A whole board of psychologists diagnosed me with severe depression because I was stimming and staring around the room. Also I got a bit cranky.

daveddd
12-27-10, 08:27 PM
LOL you take everything I say so personally.
And you don't have to reply to that.
Or do. I really don't care.
People really mustn't keep it in mind how autistic I am.
It's always 'why would you say that?' or something sarcastic which I won't get or the way you replied. I get that a lot. I don't even know how to categorize it.
It still doesn't make any sense why people that don't think they have AS would post here. I mean what this thread really needs is someone who can help the OP understand if their symptoms are enough for an AS diagnosis.
Yes, everyone is free to do what they want.
And if you get all argumentative again I'm ignoring you. ADHD people get in rows a lot, hey? Every thread has some sort of disagreement that escalates.

I wonder if people here are aware by 2013 AS will be an old diagnosis? It will be dropped from the DSM V and either be called autism disorder or social communication disorder. I think the latter fits for many people that are still unsure if they have AS.
It's a good thing too. Because AS isn't a badge to wear proud. Not saying anyone here is but I know people that are like that. And they are so against the AS/ HFA merge because they don't want to be associated with us retards (their words, not mine).
So the merge will end a lot of stigma about autism, hopefully. And hopefully the NT's will realise that people with autism aren't all mute and screaming at the drop of the hat.
I scream when the hat is scratched with a finger nail.

im aware you are probably not in agreement with my posts, and thats fine , i dont need you to be, (i dont know if you are or not thats not what im going to post)


what you said about the AS autism merger/badge of honor and not wanting to be associated with, ill put it, the word autistic caught my eye



that point actually has a small role in my view of "aspie" tests

i just didnt want to mention that


dont know if you get what i mean or not, but i think the dx change will play a role in the self dx gig



im gonna take a beating for this one

Icecream
12-27-10, 08:40 PM
Not quite sure what this means, oh well http://www.rdos.net/eng/poly12c.php?p1=64&p2=73&p3=52&p4=84&p5=65&p6=82&p7=44&p8=86&p9=36&p10=59&p11=78&p12=86

Fortune
12-27-10, 10:52 PM
im aware you are probably not in agreement with my posts, and thats fine , i dont need you to be, (i dont know if you are or not thats not what im going to post)

what you said about the AS autism merger/badge of honor and not wanting to be associated with, ill put it, the word autistic caught my eye

that point actually has a small role in my view of "aspie" tests

i just didnt want to mention that

dont know if you get what i mean or not, but i think the dx change will play a role in the self dx gig

im gonna take a beating for this one

What do you mean? Are you suggesting that people self-dx themselves because being AS sounds cool? And that calling it autism instead will discourage most from this in the future?

The distinction between AS and and autism is fairly narrow and arbitrary anyway. I think it comes down to whether you had a speech delay as a child, and some have developed incorrect assumptions both about AS and autism based on this distinction. The diagnostic merger will clean things up and eliminate unnecessary categories.

Icecream
12-27-10, 11:20 PM
I have lots of labels the most predominant one is ADHD or ADD, self-diagnosed OCD and LD. Recently Autism and Aspergers has come up as the topic of conversation often in people that are suppose to be mentors. I am really confused at to why because to have a diagnosis of 'slow' requires your functioning to be two standard deviations from the mean or below 60. So unless it helps you understand yourself I really don't see how this would be a revelant topic for most people. Is autism and asperger's the way you live or function or think, a LD?

Icecream
12-27-10, 11:22 PM
I guess I spoke to soon, as I saw a speech pathologist as a child.

Lunacie
12-27-10, 11:34 PM
I have lots of labels the most predominant one is ADHD or ADD, self-diagnosed OCD and LD. Recently Autism and Aspergers has come up as the topic of conversation often in people that are suppose to be mentors. I am really confused at to why because to have a diagnosis of 'slow' requires your functioning to be two standard deviations from the mean or below 60. So unless it helps you understand yourself I really don't see how this would be a revelant topic for most people. Is autism and asperger's the way you live or function or think, a LD?

Having Autism or Asperger's does not mean the person or child is "slow." It's a spectrum disorder just like ADHD, and some who have ASD are very bright, some are a bit slow, and many are in between those two.

ADHD is considered a disability but not necessarily a learning disability. The same is true of Autism and Asperger's, they are considered a disability, and sometimes there is a learning disability cormorbid with them.

Fortune
12-27-10, 11:42 PM
I have lots of labels the most predominant one is ADHD or ADD, self-diagnosed OCD and LD. Recently Autism and Aspergers has come up as the topic of conversation often in people that are suppose to be mentors. I am really confused at to why because to have a diagnosis of 'slow' requires your functioning to be two standard deviations from the mean or below 60. So unless it helps you understand yourself I really don't see how this would be a revelant topic for most people. Is autism and asperger's the way you live or function or think, a LD?

I don't understand your link of AS/autism to "slow"? It sounds like you mean a intellectual impairment, but AS/autism diagnoses do not require intellectual impairments.

What do you mean not being a relevant topic?

Autism isn't a learning disability. It's a pervasive developmental disability. It affects how you think, and by extension impacts how you live and function.

daveddd
12-28-10, 11:11 AM
What do you mean? Are you suggesting that people self-dx themselves because being AS sounds cool? And that calling it autism instead will discourage most from this in the future?

The distinction between AS and and autism is fairly narrow and arbitrary anyway. I think it comes down to whether you had a speech delay as a child, and some have developed incorrect assumptions both about AS and autism based on this distinction. The diagnostic merger will clean things up and eliminate unnecessary categories.

im not the one who suggested people like wearing it as a badge of honor

and that "aspies" dont wont the dx to change because of the association

i merely said that it seems like in the past i may have come across things that made me agree with that statement


but i choose not to debate this, its been done

Fortune
12-28-10, 01:19 PM
im not the one who suggested people like wearing it as a badge of honor

and that "aspies" dont wont the dx to change because of the association

i merely said that it seems like in the past i may have come across things that made me agree with that statement

but i choose not to debate this, its been done

Yes, but people who are proud of their aspie-ness are reactively proud of it, like gay pride. This doesn't mean their pride is never problematic (like the people freaking out over being called another kind of autistic person instead of the kind of autistic person that isn't spelled "autistic" now), but what fracturedstory referred to doesn't have anything to do with self-diagnosis, and you seemed to link it to self-diagnosis.

Believe me, I am reading the entire conversation, but I asked because of what you appeared to be saying, rather than what fracturedstory had said that you responded to.

Velvetdragon
12-28-10, 04:06 PM
LOL you take everything I say so personally.
And you don't have to reply to that.
Or do. I really don't care.
People really mustn't keep it in mind how autistic I am.
It's always 'why would you say that?' or something sarcastic which I won't get or the way you replied. I get that a lot. I don't even know how to categorize it.

I am confused you're laughing at me because I took your question literally. Remember others have problems with this stuff too. Especially on the internet where there are no further clues beyond the text.

I'm not even sure what you mean by "the way you replied".

I did make a mistake. I wasn't trying to be argumentative, I was just answering a question that was posed, thinking you meant it to be answered. I didn't know it was rhetorical or whatever.

I'm sorry. I hope you don't think this is worth ignoring me over. :/

Velvetdragon
12-28-10, 04:09 PM
http://www.spdfoundation.net/otherdisorders.html



Not statistics, but maybe helpful.

I am not sure and have no scientific basis for this (just anecdotal), but it seems like autistic people describe more intense SPD experiences than ADHDers in general.

Thank you this is very useful.

I know the SPD diagnosis is not in the DSM or ICD, and that it's primarily used by occupational therapists and educators and all that. It fits me almost more than anything else, and is the source of so much anxiety and so on, it greatly interferes with my life at times. I don't know if it's the result of something else, or the cause of many of my other problems!

Fortune
12-28-10, 06:36 PM
Thank you this is very useful.

I know the SPD diagnosis is not in the DSM or ICD, and that it's primarily used by occupational therapists and educators and all that. It fits me almost more than anything else, and is the source of so much anxiety and so on, it greatly interferes with my life at times. I don't know if it's the result of something else, or the cause of many of my other problems!

Weird it can be so much to cope with and it's not in the DSM-IV.

My sensory issues have been interfering with my life greatly just since November. So much yelling other loud noises everywhere. I've been told that everyone's having the same problems, but I don't see "everyone" unable to function for part of the day because the noise is so overwhelming.

I mean, they interfered before, but the increase in overall noise since November has been significant. :(

Velvetdragon
12-28-10, 09:10 PM
I think the current recommendation is "more study needed" to determine clinical signs, treatment, etc. and its use as a diagnosis. So it might be in the appendix or the upcoming appendix of DSM-5, I don't know.

So far there are very very few studies on the actual effectiveness of current treatments used and so on. Sensory integration therapy is the general technique used but whether it helps is kind of up in the air.

From everything I've read personally, I don't think I'll be seeking therapy. I don't know what they could do that I haven't already experienced in my life (it's basically exposure to different sensations, etc.). And it IS true that I have improved a whole lot since I was a kid, just not enough to be functional. x_x

Fortune
12-28-10, 10:55 PM
Mine seem to be getting worse lately.

Velvetdragon
12-28-10, 11:59 PM
I have bad days and good days.

But as a kid I was an avoidant mess. Now at least I can wear more than one outfit, don't change my underwear seven or eight times a day (my mom was soooo annoyed), and eat more than three foods.

Some days I can't hug my partners or handle being touched at all, or have to wear pajamas when leaving the house because I can't handle any stiffer clothes (I'll put on a shirt and then rip it off because it feels like sandpaper), or I have to sleep on the floor upstairs because the downstairs "smells funny". Heh.

Some days I deal with it better though, and as long as it's a soft shirt, hands are moisturized, touches are firm, not light, I can get through the day.

I have internal regulation problems related to it as well. I can't tell when I have to go to the bathroom until it's desperate. I have difficulty telling if I'm hungry or not. I have hideous temperature regulation: I shiver violently with amusingly chattering teeth in relatively warm weather, and get heat exhaustion when it's relatively cool (wandering around in confusion until someone finds me and sticks me in the shade haha). I have sucky proprioception and run into people and things constantly, my legs are always covered in bruises. These sort of things do not change and have never changed.

I wouldn't say my sensitivity has changed at all really, but my defensiveness is more under my control. Some days I am just stronger/have more willpower than others.

Lunacie
12-29-10, 12:13 AM
I have bad days and good days.

But as a kid I was an avoidant mess. Now at least I can wear more than one outfit, don't change my underwear seven or eight times a day (my mom was soooo annoyed), and eat more than three foods.

Some days I can't hug my partners or handle being touched at all, or have to wear pajamas when leaving the house because I can't handle any stiffer clothes (I'll put on a shirt and then rip it off because it feels like sandpaper), or I have to sleep on the floor upstairs because the downstairs "smells funny". Heh.

Some days I deal with it better though, and as long as it's a soft shirt, hands are moisturized, touches are firm, not light, I can get through the day.

I have internal regulation problems related to it as well. I can't tell when I have to go to the bathroom until it's desperate. I have difficulty telling if I'm hungry or not. I have hideous temperature regulation: I shiver violently with amusingly chattering teeth in relatively warm weather, and get heat exhaustion when it's relatively cool (wandering around in confusion until someone finds me and sticks me in the shade haha). I have sucky proprioception and run into people and things constantly, my legs are always covered in bruises. These sort of things do not change and have never changed.

I wouldn't say my sensitivity has changed at all really, but my defensiveness is more under my control. Some days I am just stronger/have more willpower than others.

Except for the first paragraph you're totally describing me.

Unfortunately my sensitivity issues have become worse in the last several years. Something to do with hormonal changes associated with menopause perhaps? Or do I notice it all more because I'm less distracted by a crumbling marriage now that I'm post-divorce?

Icecream
12-29-10, 12:54 AM
Is it possible to have some aspie like symptoms in response to very stressful events in life? For example, my mother had acoustic neroma and almost died when I was five, she was gone for a few years. I believe this impacted my younger siblings as well. My two younger brothers born in 82' and 84' passed away of accidental OD's 5 years and two days apart.
In between the death of the first and second my Grandfather passed away on my brothers Birthday, 2004. This year my sisters soon to be ex-husband died in a motor-cycle accident. I was twenty when my first brother passed and I don't know that I will ever heal or be able to cope with it. The second brother passed in 2006, and I still can't mourn. It's like the emotion is blocked.

Fortune
12-29-10, 01:42 AM
I am not sure that not being able to mourn is strictly an AS symptom. I mean, it could be, but you need more than that to really look at AS.

fracturedstory
12-29-10, 10:44 PM
I agree that the merge will result in less AS self dx'es. People really do prefer the term over autism. People will cling on the the AS label for dear life after it has gone. They are being very annoying and loud about it now.

I'm comfortable being autistic and talking about it. It has made me more open minded to people with other disabilities.

And I am slow, or appear to be. I process spoken words slower. I need to break everything up to understand it. I need to things one at a time. I only cook what I know how to cook. I'd barely ever try to cook something different.
But somehow I have an average IQ. But a verbal delay and a set of symptoms in childhood I dub 'traditional autistic symptoms' make me fit moderate to high functioning autism.
I'm not doing so good these days on the whole functional thing. Sensory issues are severe which makes all my other symptoms severe too.

I'm still mourning the death of my father and loss of some of my pets. It's easy for me to show emotions. I know people with AS who can't mourn over certain things but others can. There's either too little emotion or too much.

I am confused you're laughing at me because I took your question literally. Remember others have problems with this stuff too. Especially on the internet where there are no further clues beyond the text.

I'm not even sure what you mean by "the way you replied".

I did make a mistake. I wasn't trying to be argumentative, I was just answering a question that was posed, thinking you meant it to be answered. I didn't know it was rhetorical or whatever.

I'm sorry. I hope you don't think this is worth ignoring me over. :/
There's a difference between personally and literally.
But I'll leave it there.
I don't know what I meant either. I haven't got a word for it yet.
I'm only ignoring you or others because sometimes what people say is confusing.
Sorry for laughing. I guess that is a defense mechanism. To not take things so seriously so they don't bother me as much.

Velvetdragon
12-30-10, 02:10 AM
We went to visit my husband's relatives over Christmas. Autism runs VERY strongly in his family... as in literally half his cousins on his mom's side are diagnosed with some form of ASD, and it's apparent in some of his aunts and uncles as well.

Like me, he has many of the secondary traits, but none of the communication diagnostic criteria (A). We both have many of the (B) criteria. He said rather than being disordered, it's "a part of the richness of [my] personality." *lol*



Sorry for laughing. I guess that is a defense mechanism. To not take things so seriously so they don't bother me as much.

It's okay, I'm sorry for reacting.

Fortune
12-31-10, 12:59 PM
Daveddd,

Here's the maintainer's explanation of the Aspie Quiz and what has gone into developing and refining it:

Aspie-quiz paper (http://www.rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.pdf)

Just as a warning, it is 52 pages.

Lunacie
12-31-10, 01:31 PM
Daveddd,

Here's the maintainer's explanation of the Aspie Quiz and what has gone into developing and refining it:

Aspie-quiz paper (http://www.rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.pdf)

Just as a warning, it is 52 pages.

Thanks for posting the link. Even reading just the first paragraph was very interesting and informative. The research showing that Native Americans have more incidence of Autism diagnosis than Caucasians or Asians makes me wonder about a coorelation between higher incidence of ADHD among Native Americans than Caucasians - which is a discussion Barliman and I were having just yesterday about why those numbers are higher in the US than in other countries. There has been a lot of intermingling of the races here in the States.