View Full Version : Advice on my cleaning business


luckywife
12-17-10, 01:58 PM
Hi Guys,
I just open a cleaning business; however, not many clients yet. Any ideas how to attract clients, maybe any promotions that can attract clients like you. Please advice. Would you choose to clean your house a chain company as Molly maid, Merry maids or a local company like me, why?

Canuck223
12-17-10, 04:16 PM
Profile your target audience. Who are they. What are they?

I have to play outside the politically correct arena to answer your question. Asbestos undies on....

The perception of house cleaning services in your area seem to include undocumented workers who may be exploited, or bonded companies insured against employee theft.

In your shoes I'd promote how I stand out and can provide the service the customer wants without the ethical or security concerns they may have with the competition.

Sandy4957
12-17-10, 04:42 PM
Being undocumented or uninsured is probably the only reason that one would consider going with "Merry Maids," etc. over a small business. You're always paying for the overhead with one of those companies (some of which includes insurance, etc.), and there's no guarantee of good-quality service. I would MUCH rather have my people be owners in their own company.

I have hired services several times, and these are my criteria: good quality, reasonable price, personable. I like to know that if the company has employees doing the work, that they have been with the company for a long time and are well compensated, because then they will do a good job.

So I'd go out and buy a modest insurance policy to cover little things like a broken vase, etc. And then I'd stump. Pick a neighborhood where you want to get work and drop flyers. Word of mouth is your best advertisement, so shower your early customers with thank you's and little niceties, etc. to make them want to recommend you.

I've cleaned houses, btw. There is also a very experienced house cleaner on this board who may be intrigued by your title and weigh in.

Think about what people who you can help talk about when they say things that indicate that they could use your help. They'll want to hire you because they feel overwhelmed by cleaning, right? So address that in your advertisements. "Feeling overwhelmed? Let us take care of it for you."

You might also address the basic concern that keeps most people from hiring such a service, i.e., expense. The way that I analyze these things is: how much time do I spend per week cleaning without a service? How much money could I make if I spent that same amount of time billing work? Once upon a time when I was working for other people, my time was "worth" something like $75 an hour (after taxes) to ME (as opposed to the equity partners in my firm, where it was worth more like half my billable rate), so I figured that it was well worth the expense if I could find someone to do it for less than that.

Perhaps you could do that potential calculation for your customers. So you pick out a neighborhood with the right demographics, and you drop flyers that tout that you are insured and all your papers are in order for you and any employees, and then you say, "Overwhelmed? Let us take care of it... For just $X per hour, you can gain an average of Y hours per week to do what you want. You can work more and earn more, or spend hassle-free time with your family!" Whatever. I'm not any sort of advertising person. But I am someone who has hired cleaning services, and that's the sort of analysis that would work for me.

Sandy4957
12-17-10, 04:43 PM
Oops. Double posted. Not sure how that happened. Sorry.

PedroDaGr8
01-25-11, 01:47 AM
The user mADD Mike on here runs a successful cleaning business with his wife. You may want to message him and get his advice. He's a nice guy and should be able to give you advice.

notsoplainJane
01-25-11, 02:25 AM
Hi Guys,
Would you choose to clean your house a chain company as Molly maid, Merry maids or a local company like me, why?

Almost assuredly a smaller company because self-employed people are more versatile. Also, it's been my experience that the chain companies have it laid out very specifically in the contract what they will do each week. Sometimes, an area in the house may not need its usual cleaning, yet another area (that isn't in the contract) does. But the chains won't exchange one room for another or allow for any deviations.

mADD mike
01-26-11, 01:30 PM
The user mADD Mike on here runs a successful cleaning business with his wife. You may want to message him and get his advice. He's a nice guy and should be able to give you advice.

I do like to help, but the OP appears to have been a one post wonder looking to plug something, possibly their own website since their post was removed. People often spread links to their business for SEO purposes, even on unrelated boards.

There is plenty of help out there for cleaning businesses. I am a member of some associations that help and that I offer help through. I am working on producing ebooks and such on wide variety of businesses and such, but won't be promoting it here. I wish the OP the best, but since they haven't logged on again since posting this, it was probably a drive-by and I'm not going to chime in.

PedroDaGr8
01-26-11, 02:05 PM
Haha didn't even notice that. Yeah, likely a SEO spammer then. DOH!