View Full Version : TS-Autism Off Shoot


Energizer_Bunny
08-10-04, 09:03 PM
In a previous post Trebor mentioned that "TS is an Autism Off-Shoot".


I have spoken with someone before that mentioned that they felt like Tourettes and Aspergers had something in common. I have always personally felt that in my diagnosis that there is a missing piece of the puzzle.

Can you clarify a little more on this for us.

Thanks
Sherry

Trebor
08-11-04, 01:16 AM
There are not as many differences to Aspergers and Tourettes as one may think.

In both cases, they are Autism Off-shoots. In both cases, a persons mind is in a way rewired to think slightly differently. People with Tourettes and Aspergers tend to be very creative in music, art, and thinking in general.

The Washington Post 2 years ago Published an article on Aspergers and I became intrigued when people said the article matched my description.

It talked about a young boy who was shunned from the rest of his class and peers for how he thought. He created vast worlds in his mind and often kept these creative thoughts to himself. It was also described that children with Aspergers tend to act more mature for their age. an example the Post used was, "A normal child when asked about a secret fort would generally respond, "I can't tell you, it's a secret." However, a child with aspergers would say something like this. "I'm sorry but I can not divulge that information at this time. It is strictly confidential."

I myself, used to do such things. I still do. I created a world called Trithal in my mind and I have longed to write it all out on paper. It's very elaborate right down to the details of the buildings and each individual citizen. When I gave this comparison, I looked more into the subject.

My band director introduced me to an article the post wrote about a local Jazz Musician who has tourettes. I'd need to dig up the article from my archvies of tourettes information to find his name, but tourettes syndrome has helped his carrear flourish. Much like Aspergers, he has a world in his head. Just, his world is a musical world (Something people with autism tend to have. They are musical geniuses.) Something I cherish having myself.

With both being Off shoots of Autism. The destinct difference is that with Aspergers, you can not recognize emotions at all. People with Aspergers must litterally be taught to learn what it means for a person to be sad, or to be happy. They do not feel emotion nor can they read it. People with Tourettes are able to feel and understand emotions. Thats why they are different from each other. Everything is the same with both of the syndromes. In both cases, people with them are very intelligent, creative human beings who just happen to have their brains wired differently from the normal people. It's just the fact that one can feel emotions and the other can't that happens to be your missing peice of the puzzle.

If you want, I can go search for the articles and the books I've read and give the titles. I just can't do it at this hour seeing as it's 1:16am for me.

I'm a wealth of information and oppinions. Feel free to use me as you wish. If there is something I don't know, I can find it out within a day or two.

-Trebor

P.S. Pardon the spelling. I might be intelligent, but that doesnt mean I'm a good speller. ;)

Energizer_Bunny
08-11-04, 03:15 AM
Trebor,

Thank you so much, you are a wealth of information!!!!!!:D
I am aware of the Jazz musician you speak of. There is actually a movie out about him which I have not yet gotten my hands on.

However, you speak of creativity.........I am not really all that creative in the areas of music or art or writing........if I am, I have not yet discovered it. I have been able to create songs in my head at night while trying to go to sleep and even heard the words and the music together. But to be able to get up and rewrite what I heard is impossible because I have short term memory loss. However, when thing that I love to do and that can actually put me into another world is dancing. I regret years later that my parents did not get me involved in all that girl stuff as far as dancing is concerned I am not to sure about being a ballerina and balancing on my toes, but probably something more like tap and jazz would suit me. I have a strong desire to learn Salas, etc and even take up ballroom dancing. Dancing just makes me feel good. Doing something that is stimulating actually increases the endorphins in the brain and makes you feel good in your body!

However, I am creative in other areas such as solving problems at work. I am the type that likes to dig a little deeper and can really get into some details. However, I find this odd since I am also ADHD, but then again I am also OCD.

However, when I was little I started rocking. Mom said that I started as soon as I was starting to sit up. I am 42 and still rock. But when I rocked, I always went into my own little world. I made up dreams or fantasies. I would actually write them down and on so many occasions would actually find myself rocking again and repeating the dream over in my head until it was just right, which I think is some of the OCD.

You mentioned "It was also described that children with Aspergers tend to act more mature for their age. an example the Post used was, "A normal child when asked about a secret fort would generally respond, "I can't tell you, it's a secret." However, a child with aspergers would say something like this. "I'm sorry but I can not divulge that information at this time. It is strictly confidential." Well, that was not me, I would be the kid that would probably say, if I told you all my secrets I would not have any. Now if that was considered more mature, that I can't answer. :confused:

If you happen to have the time to run across any of the books or titles, I would be interested in seeing them. However, would you please send me a private message in forms concerning the information.

Thanks again Trebor and please dont' worry about your spelling. It is 2:15am here.

-Sherry

Piupau
08-11-04, 08:21 PM
Welcome here Trebor :) I'm also interested in this subject. I have a dx of ts+adhd, but I feel that I have a lot of things from the aspie side too. I can play almost any instrument you give me, but I can't read music, I play as it's supposed to sound. I don't know what the keys and stuff are called. Also I've made up songs to my son, he loves to hear me sing when he's going to sleep. I LOVE the drums! A good drum solo can almost make me go into trance! :D :D I have an imaginary world in my head too. I've won awards on stories I wrote as a kid.

Energizer_Bunny
08-12-04, 05:04 AM
Happy to hear of your many talents Piupau. That is awesome that you are able to do these things. Keep up the good work!

Piupau
08-12-04, 08:51 PM
Well, I've not been writing for YEARS. Or painting. That's my stongest side though. The artistic one. In school my techer sent my paintings to art exhibitons. It's hard to get going once you've stopped. My husband plays the guitarr and our son loves it :) He's 3 yo and playing (not for real!) it all the time, he loves the sound of acoustic guitarrs, when he hears music on tv or on radio he runs to the guitarr and plays along :D

Sc@tterBr@in_UK
08-13-04, 03:55 AM
I'm not saying I'm not creative, but from all I know about Asperger's (which is a lot, including one of the "Current issues in Autism" volumes and several by Lorna Wing, Ami Klin, Christopher Gillberg etc.), and all I know about myself and others with AS that I've got to know online, none of what Trebor has mentioned about AS has anything in common with the "official" and clinical picture of Asperger's.

The "American Media Picture" of AS may be that of a creativecrazy genius, tick-y, impulsive, utterly inappropriate (and often violent) emotional cripple but that picture is about as far removed from the real picture of AS and Autism as you can get.

Trebor
08-14-04, 02:17 AM
I never mentioned that AS involved anything ticky. I also never mentioned that they were implusive.

However people with AS do have social problems due to a lack of responce to another persons body language. Also, why would someone be impulsive if they prefer everything to be the same? After all, that is something people with AS can exhibit as a symptom.

AS is also similar to TS in that the symptoms can range from mild to severe.

In both instances a persons brain is generally re-wired to think and have a person act a different way.

PM me if you wish to have a few more links and resources. I'd be more than happy to share.

gingagirl
08-14-04, 07:32 PM
The destinct difference is that with Aspergers, you can not recognize emotions at all. People with Aspergers must litterally be taught to learn what it means for a person to be sad, or to be happy. They do not feel emotion nor can they read it.
I think Trebor's description about AS & emotions was mis-stated --it's a little too absolute. All people have feelings & emotions. People with AS have difficulty expressing & understanding the emotions, but they most definitely do have feelings. :D

Piupau
08-15-04, 02:59 AM
I have lots of friends on internet that have AS. We have talked a lot about emotions and stuff. Them I've been talking to have problems niticing other ppl's feelings by looking at the body language or facial expressions, but they have feelings them selves.

Trebor
08-19-04, 12:30 AM
I appologise for the lack of additional words. I know very well people with AS have emotions :) I did indeed mean that they have problems recognizing other peoples emotions. Sorry if I have offended anyone.