View Full Version : Meditation & Brain Power


Bluerose
02-17-11, 01:46 PM
Meditation & Brain Power

People used to think that our brain is something we can’t influence. But in recent years, research has shown that this just isn't true. The brain is like a muscle that can be trained and re-trained.

In order to see our life as it really is, and how it is effected by us and everything and everyone around us, we need to take a step back. Meditation helps us to do that. In the process of training our awareness through meditation, we learn to understand how our habitual thoughts shape our reality.

This will only work for you if you want it to work and if you are ready to make some changes in your life. If you want more from life, if you want to understand yourself and others more, then try meditating for ten or fifteen minutes a day.

Meditation helps us to change our attention, which is normally in default mode/autopilot, because it trains us to be more present. When we learn to become aware of our moment-to-moment awareness our life begins to change.

One of the simplest ways I know to get started meditating is to just sit quietly, relaxed, breath normally, and count your breaths. The intention is to focus on the breath and keep your concentration in the present. To begin with, lots of thoughts will bombard you but you must be firm and ignore them for the time being. Making the decision to deal with these thoughts when your meditation session is done helps.

We are constructing our sense of self from moment to moment. That’s what our internal dialogue is doing. When we meditate we become more aware of the constant chatter (mostly negative) in the mind.

Even if you only meditate for a short time to begin with, you will want to do it for a longer periods of time once you begin to feel the effects of it in your life.

What’s your experience with meditation?

Laurelgardner
02-17-11, 03:28 PM
I actually did a blog post (http://findingfocusandshinythings.blogspot.com/2011/01/meditation-for-adhd-brief-introduction.html) about meditation a few weeks back. I'll c'p from it the bit about my experiences:

Whatever difficulties can come in learning to meditate (I'll get to those in a moment), I still think it's a shame not to try. The benefits of meditation to the ADD mind are profound in both a practical and emotional sense. First and foremost, it helps with hyperactivity, teaching one the art of stillness and calm. It's also a highly comforting balm to the emotional distress we so often experience, while creating a mental state excellent for gaining insight and unraveling bad habits. And of course, it helps with focus.

I myself learned to meditate via a hypnotist (hypnotism and meditation are essentially the same things; the differences between them split hairs along the lines of how the trance states are used, but that's really up to the user either way). He was actually an entertainer, and with trademark ADHD "look at me!"-ism, I volunteered to be a "subject" for his stage show. I found the experience of hypnosis so profound, I bought some of his CDs and started to learn self-hypnosis. The CDs contained ambient electronic music as well as progressive relaxation hypnotic inductions and instructions, including guided visualizations and behavior-modification exercises. Pretty basic stuff.

Chances are, I wouldn't have been able to learn the discipline if I'd tried to start from scratch, no music, no direction, just me sitting down, closing my eyes, and trying it. I needed the voice on the CD to give me direction and keep me focused until I'd been doing it for quite some time on my own. But that's what worked for me. For many people, visual stimulus is required to get into a meditative state, or some kind of meditative physical activity, like yoga, or a repetitive action. Things like drawing, getting lost in music, light housework, gardening, working with your hands, can all be good ways to get into the mindset.

Bluerose
02-17-11, 04:19 PM
Those CDs sound interesting. I agree with you, different people will benefit from different methods. But most people are too caught up in life and may need some quiet time in order to discover what works best for them. Zazen (sitting meditation) provides that quiet time and calms the mind.

anonymouslyadd
02-17-11, 05:22 PM
Meditation, although, difficult is very benificial to me. When i'm finished my 20 minute regimen, my mind is very clear.

Bluerose
02-17-11, 05:45 PM
Maybe it’s just me, but meditation gave me amazing insight into my inner world of which I’ve written about on here. It has helped me to heal.

Bluerose
02-23-11, 02:28 PM
Okay so you want to start meditating but you don’t know where begin. I don’t know much but I can get you started. And once you get the hang of it there are some good books out there that can help you to advance.

So what would you like to know?

Kunga Dorji
02-24-11, 07:36 AM
Meditation & Brain Power

People used to think that our brain is something we can’t influence. But in recent years, research has shown that this just isn't true. The brain is like a muscle that can be trained and re-trained.

In order to see our life as it really is, and how it is effected by us and everything and everyone around us, we need to take a step back. Meditation helps us to do that. In the process of training our awareness through meditation, we learn to understand how our habitual thoughts shape our reality.

This will only work for you if you want it to work and if you are ready to make some changes in your life. If you want more from life, if you want to understand yourself and others more, then try meditating for ten or fifteen minutes a day.

Meditation helps us to change our attention, which is normally in default mode/autopilot, because it trains us to be more present. When we learn to become aware of our moment-to-moment awareness our life begins to change.

One of the simplest ways I know to get started meditating is to just sit quietly, relaxed, breath normally, and count your breaths. The intention is to focus on the breath and keep your concentration in the present. To begin with, lots of thoughts will bombard you but you must be firm and ignore them for the time being. Making the decision to deal with these thoughts when your meditation session is done helps.

We are constructing our sense of self from moment to moment. That’s what our internal dialogue is doing. When we meditate we become more aware of the constant chatter (mostly negative) in the mind.

Even if you only meditate for a short time to begin with, you will want to do it for a longer periods of time once you begin to feel the effects of it in your life.

What’s your experience with meditation?

My experience is overwhelmingly positive. I meditate whenever I have a free moment- on the train, when walking, when settling to sleep, when sitting through boring meetings, in queues at Safeway. I even teach it at work.
I do also do formal sitting sessions- 25 minutes is enough.
You are right - it is highly addictive. However the better I get at it the more efficient and unruffled I become in action. I am working up a serious post on the technique that broke the back of my ADHD. It should be ready for posting in a couple of weeks ( Tax time and I have run out of time for procrastinating!)

Kunga Dorji
02-24-11, 07:40 AM
Okay so you want to start meditating but you donít know where begin. I donít know much but I can get you started. And once you get the hang of it there are some good books out there that can help you to advance.

So what would you like to know?

There are plenty of good on line audio resources too:
Have a look at the "Winter 2010 series". These come from a Buddhist source, but as Gil says at the start they are offered as a tool that can be used independently of any religious tradition.

Gil has such a nice voice too- I listen to him if I feel agitated because I can attune to his chilled Californian vibe and leave my agitation behind.

Straight relaxation exercises are a great way to start too.

daveddd
02-24-11, 07:49 AM
There are plenty of good on line audio resources too:
Have a look at the "Winter 2010 series". These come from a Buddhist source, but as Gil says at the start they are offered as a tool that can be used independently of any religious tradition.

Gil has such a nice voice too- I listen to him if I feel agitated because I can attune to his chilled Californian vibe and leave my agitation behind.

Straight relaxation exercises are a great way to start too.

for some reason ive been reading a lot on schema therapy lately

its a new therapy and listed in the dsm as treatment


it incorporates mindfulness

http://books.google.com/books?id=vScjGGgJEZgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=schema+therapy&hl=en&src=bmrr&ei=aURmTZLmI4KBlAenysSKAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false