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FaithofLeap
02-25-11, 11:48 PM
www.faithofleap.com (http://www.faithofleap.com)

In 2010, I was diagnosed with adult ADD, traits of aspergers syndrome and mild Dyslexia. By now i’m sure you’ve noticed I reversed the phrase, “Leap of Faith”. To me this draws a picture of why I believe ADD/ADHD can be a gift as long as we can control the antithesis of this gift which is the “splat”. To me, a “leap of faith” takes a conscious effort and some forethought before you make that faithful jump. The “Faith of Leap” is for us adult ADDers who rely on the faith part after we have already made the jump. Faith that we will land in the right place and not on the rocks below. We tend not to plan before we leap. We so often, splat on the rocks below while the people around us are happy to point it out to us. Some of the most successful and influential people in history and today were driven by their ADD. Were they just ordinary, boring people? No, they are usually quite eccentric and fearless. They are the ones who have made failures, learned from their failures and pressed on. While everybody else is deciding to “leap”, the ADDer’s have already leaped, splatted, leaped, splatted and leaped again. While battered and bruised from the falls, they finally landed on that discovery, venture or contract they lunged for while everybody else is still deciding how or if they should leap. Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein, Bill Gates, Ansel Adams and Ty Pennington are just a small handful of ADDers who have made contributions to this world. Please join me in my journey of self discovery and every so often the inevitable splat.

Trooper Keith
02-25-11, 11:53 PM
Steve Jobs,

Citation needed.

Albert Einstein,

Citation needed.

Bill Gates,

Citation needed.

Ansel Adams

Citation needed.

and Ty Pennington

Hooray, you got one!

FaithofLeap
02-26-11, 01:26 AM
Harsh:rolleyes:

Yeah I know...

I'm ADD I don't research well.

Got any replacement in mind.:o

peripatetic
02-26-11, 11:08 AM
I believe ADD/ADHD can be a gift as long as we can control the antithesis of this gift which is the “splat”.

While everybody else is deciding to “leap”, the ADDer’s have already leaped, splatted, leaped, splatted and leaped again. While battered and bruised from the falls, they finally landed on that discovery, venture or contract they lunged for while everybody else is still deciding how or if they should leap.

greetings, and welcome to the forums :)

i see you're quite new, but also that you're a rather prolific poster in spite of that. from your first post and reaction to keith's reply, i suspect you are/were/will be surprised/confused that there are some who disagree (but please correct me if i'm wrong on that and you are unsurprised)?? you seem like you're probably a nice person and mean well and because the lauding of the "gift" of adhd is.....well, let's say i'm not a "gifter"...i offer my perspective. in preface, i sincerely hope what follows is helpful in some way and if i come off blunt/harsh/etc it's not personal as my bluntness is an equal opportunity kind of thing;)

so...three things, really:

1. with the successful folks with adhd mention: in addition to most not being known to actually have (had) adhd, the whole "examples of success *due to adhd*" thing is not the least bit uplifting or motivating or comforting to me.

why? the suggestion that these people have taken the same disorder that wreaks havoc on many of our lives (in a wide variety of more and less significant, but many quite drastic and irreparable, ways) and "capitalized" on it and so we all could...that's either disheartening or offensive. because what's my ****ing problem, right? why am i ...well, we don't need to get into specifics here; the point is: if that's true, that one just needs to wrangle the gift and persist long enough and want whatever one considers "success", then i'm either a failure (because lacking that ability to make my "gift" work) or i am not trying hard enough or lack desire/will (because the implication is that IF i wanted it and put forth effort, then i could be as successful thanks to the benefits of adhd).

plus, since oftentimes those cited are not known to have adhd and so it's more about accuracy and making claims with some evidence or just throwing stuff out there. and even those actual, substantiated "successes" are a tiny fraction of those of us with adhd. (and, i suspect, but do not know for certain, that the ratio of wildly successful adhd to all adhd is smaller than wildly successful non's to all non's...i mean...we're talking about a disorder that results in maladaptive behaviors here.)

2. the first sentence of yours i quoted above about controlling the negative consequences of lacking impulse control in order to take advantage of the "gift" that is adhd:

i don't even know where to begin. i've heard hyperactivity touted as a benefit (FALSE), aspects of inattention (FALSE) and seen (unsubstantiated) links made between adhd and creativity, intuitiveness and intelligence (FALSE, FALSE, FALSE). this is the first time i've seen impulsivity heralded as a path to success. seriously, my impulse control issues, whilst yes, it's all a hodge podge and they intersect and exacerbate each other, of all the presentations/manifestations/behaviors related to adhd (and i meet all of criteria) *without question*, it has done the most damage socially, professionally, legally, financially and any other arena of life i'm neglecting at six AM.

i see that you have been recently diagnosed and i can empathize generally with wanting to find a sliver lining and whatnot. however, i truly can't wrap my head around how we can remotely be talking about the same thing AT ALL. it seems like you're talking about lack of impulse control, acting/speaking/reacting before thinking and not considering consequences...but your reframing of an absolute privation...a deficit...and, at least for me THE most destructive one, into a benefit, a gift that's the key to success? *does not compute* i'm not saying you don't have impulse control problems or that you haven't suffered tragedy or anything like that. it's simply not possible that i'm reading you right and/or we have VERY different degrees of impulsivity.

regardless, i do wish you well and am happy for your successes. i do think that it's important that adhd experiences are shared and there is, of course, a wide variety of them given we're all individuals. i also believe that you are only offering something from a good place and not seeing at least one other perspective on semi-celebrating the "gift" that's part of, for most of us, why we have been diagnosed with....not a gift, but a *disorder* that causes significant impairment in at least two areas of life since before age seven (i know, i know...DSM V will be different....but it's not out yet, so i'm going with what is).

3. with the second quoted portion of your post: you know the saying "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger?" that may work out for some, but it's not universally true. what doesn't kill you can create huge, intractable-despite-sincere-remorse problems, often with accompanying regret, guilt, loss...you get the idea.

yes, there are fortuitous incidents....adhd or no...and i've been lucky on many occasions...but there's also a crushing reality about, at least for me, having NO impulse control (better on medication, but not "fixed" by a *longshot*). i've said things can't be UNsaid, i've done damage that can't be repaired--physical and interpersonal, i've been misunderstood, written off, believed shallow, callous, lacking in ethical fortitude and "character" in general, insensitive and rude. i've broken bones and hearts and vehicles. i've appeared to be and judged as acting in direct opposition to how i would act if i had considered consequences and i've failed to communicate palatably in such a horrible fashion as to be ignored after just one exchange. given all that it would, in my view, be unfathomable and disrespectful of me to suggest that my lacking impulse control is a gift.

all that said i DO consider myself amongst the fortunate, not because of adhd and specifically impulsivity, but IN SPITE OF it. i'm not homeless, incarcerated or isolated. i am employed (at present...we'll see in a few months), educated, married, "free" (though on probation) and grateful to have several solid friendships. those "successes" are, again, not due to implusivity or adhd in general, but DESPITE it and likely more the result of parental advocacy, financial soundness and lifelong access to quality healthcare.

anyway...i'm going to wrap this up because i keep writing a paragraph, then going off, returning for another, etc, and this is probably already disjointed enough;) i hope it is coherent though and gives you something to consider that's useful in some way. while i can't relate to your experience of adhd and our backgrounds may differ considerably, i do wish to understand your perspective and welcome any additional rationale or critiques of my points above that you are willing to share.

best wishes

Lunacie
02-26-11, 11:21 AM
There are a few blind people who have gone on to become famous successes, and probably many who quietly manage their lives successfully. Do they credit their blindness as being a gift?

There are always a few people in any demographic who become famous successes, and many in any demographic who quietly manage their lives successfully. Most do not credit their disabilities as being a gift.

They have been successful in spite of their disabilities, not because of them.

The lucky ones manage to land on something successful rather than going splat - but it may be largely a matter of luck and perserverance.

We all do well to see the glass as being half full instead of half empty, but we also have to be honest with ourselves about what we're dealing with and how it affects our lives.

Lunacie
02-26-11, 11:24 AM
Harsh:rolleyes:

Yeah I know...

I'm ADD I don't research well.

Got any replacement in mind.:o

We've had several threads, a couple of fairly recent ones, about famous people who have ADHD. Being ADHD doesn't mean not being able to do research well. Some can, and some can't, just as in any demographic.

FaithofLeap
02-26-11, 01:01 PM
greetings, and welcome to the forums :)

i see you're quite new, but also that you're a rather prolific poster in spite of that. from your first post and reaction to keith's reply, i suspect you are/were/will be surprised/confused that there are some who disagree (but please correct me if i'm wrong on that and you are unsurprised)?? you seem like you're probably a nice person and mean well and because the lauding of the "gift" of adhd is.....well, let's say i'm not a "gifter"...i offer my perspective. in preface, i sincerely hope what follows is helpful in some way and if i come off blunt/harsh/etc it's not personal as my bluntness is an equal opportunity kind of thing;)



I am not surprised. I take constructive criticism well. I appreciate all perspectives. As you know, I am new to the community and can only reflect my experiences. Ever since having to repeat the 6th grade, I learned that dwelling on my misery of the failure was getting me nowhere. At that point, for my own sanity, I decided to only see my failures as opportunities. I can share hours and hours of some of the most depressing, gut wrenching, stories of abuse, sadness, cruelty, failure and heartache if I wanted to. I do share these experiences sometimes to those who need to know that they are not alone in their struggles. But to just start talking about those things for the sake of conversation made no sense because I let those things go. The experiences I do dwell on are and like to share are the ones about how some of my failures became foundations for something better to come.

I by no means when I use the term success am talking about living in a mansion on a hill overlooking all of the little people. To me, my success is having a family, working at a sewage plant, living in a house, having electricity, and 18 channels of free TV coming from an antenna.:)

Life only can deal you so many cards. If you have ever been in a house of cards building contest, the person who builds the strongest foundation usually has the shortest house but wins. The person who builds the tallest is bound to fail because they used all of their foundation cards on height. When we fail, we feel like we are crushed, compacted, drained and can't breath. What we have now are good ingredients for a foundation; well compacted soil that drains well.:D

Again, I am open to constructive criticism because I am here to learn about myself and make some friends. Criticism that has no merit will be ignored. I understand that there are some out there who empower themselves by making others feel bad just for the sake that they want others to feel as miserable as them but I have not experienced that here yet.:D

Thank You

shysmile
02-26-11, 03:32 PM
Though not everyone will agree ADHD can be a gift, like the above posters have clearly stated, for a small few it very much can be, it "clicks" and makes total sense. The people above are speaking their personal experiences and what they've looked for in others. I have experienced that my symptoms can momentarily be transformed into gifts if I am highly aware in a different way. I don't like to talk about it on here because I'm kinda shy, and I don't think I'd be believed. I can definitely say I think you're onto something though.

:)