View Full Version : Is it possible to have aspergers and not take things literally


branjie
03-09-11, 09:59 PM
My son has ADHD and today a third teacher has said to me that she thinks he has Aspergers. One of the reasons I didn't get him tested when two other teachers thought he has it, is that he doesn't take things literally. He loves jokes where words have two meanings, he understands sarcasm, he gets metaphors. He also doesn't seem to have any trouble reading other people's facial expressions or body language. He has empathy for others, and is affectionate.

He does however have limited interests, an obsession with video games and an inability to have conversations that don't particularly interest him which leads to social difficulties. For example if an adult asks him a question like how was your day, he may not feel any obligation to respond. He might not even look at the person or pull a silly face, and if pressed, may not even know how to answer and just say errrr and pull more faces. If he was with me, he'd probably answer straight away and quickly start talking about something that interests him. He also has a tic and other physical behaviours which I had just put down to ADHD fidgeting. Not sure if this is a symptom but he has stated that he really enjoys starting at people when he's at school. I think he knows that this is not appropriate, but he doesn't care. He also doesn't desire social activites with his peers other than his best friend with a simmilar personality and obsession with video games. For the most part he seems like a normal boy, but there is something about him which makes him less connected with the rest of the world.

Should I get him tested for aspergers? He has a huge amount of difficulty organizing himself at school and he would get funding for help with this if he had Aspergers (no funding for ADHD).

Spikey 723
03-09-11, 10:07 PM
I've recently found out that I have atypical aspergers. I don't really take things literally, and boy do I get sarcasm!

I have difficulty with thinking of others, but not the full range of asperger traits. Therefore my diagnosis is classed as atypical.

Having an assessment might be useful. I certainly wasn't expecting to be diagnosed.

branjie
03-09-11, 10:12 PM
My question for my son's teacher was, is there any benefit for him being diagnosed? She said yes, he'd get extra help at school. I've got a feeling he won't have it, and it will cost hundreds and dollars to be assessed, that's why I'm trying to find out if he's likely to have aspergers, or if it's going to be a lot of money down the drain. I'll look up atypical aspergers and see if that can shed any light on things.

Spikey 723
03-09-11, 10:32 PM
If three teachers have suggested it ...

Research things, then weigh up the costs involved. I'm in UK, so my assessment on the NHS didn't cost. (We even got travel expenses paid.)

fracturedstory
03-10-11, 01:22 AM
You can have AS and not take things literally. The not knowing how to answer things leads me to believe he may have AS or selective mutism. He answers for you but no one else? And talking interests is a clear sign.

You could try to get him diagnosed, just tell him not to be sarcastic. One women's boy instantly got denied a diagnosis because he made one sarcastic joke.

AbsentMindProf
03-10-11, 07:50 AM
Things like that can be tricky. Many people with Asperger syndrome are highly intelligent and can find compensatory strategies to work around difficulties.

My 9 year old son has Asperger syndrome. He is VERY literal, but he's smart enough to understand the general concept of a figure of speech (although he thinks it's really weird that the rest of us use them). He can infer when someone is using a figure of speech. Even though he is very literal, if someone says "Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater" -- he can figure out that they must mean something else.

That said, it doesn't really sound like Asperger syndrome from what you've described. Still... I know from personal experience that objectivity can fly right out the window when you're thinking about your own child.

An evaluation can't hurt. Even if it's not AS, there might be another diagnosis that would be appropriate and beneficial.

Nitz
03-14-11, 01:10 PM
It is, I know someone with severe Asperger's, on the borderline of High Functioning Autism(referring to Classic Autism, but on the more independant and communicating side of it), and he loves literature, understands metaphores far better than me(XD), sarcasm, and any non-literal uses of words.

As for vice versa, looking at myself in Literature classes it sure is(WHAT DO YOU MEAN A DESERT SHIP MEANS A CAMEL?! ISN'T IT SUPPOSED TO BE A SHIP-LIKE VIHECLE MADE ESPECIALLY FOR THE DESERT OR SOMETHING?!)! :D