View Full Version : Undiscovered homeopathic med: citicoline


jr22hockey
03-19-11, 03:45 AM
I did not write this:

Effect on Neurotransmitters
Evidence of citicoline’s ability to enhance nor- epinephrine release in humans was found in a study showing citicoline raised urinary levels of 3-methoxy- 4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), a norepinephrine metabolite.16
Citicoline increased brain levels of neurotrans- mitters in rats at a dose of 100 mg/kg, administered daily for seven days. Norepinephrine increased in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, dopamine increased in the corpus striatum, and serotonin increased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus.17 Rat studies have found evidence that citicoline potentiates dopamine release in the brain, presumably by stimulat- ing release of acetylcholine.18

However, I have tried citicoline and it really really works. I am veery sensitive to drugs/supplements but still, people should try this stuff.

meadd823
03-19-11, 05:07 AM
If you did not write the stuff about the neurotransmitters who did

meadd823
03-19-11, 05:18 AM
web md- citocoline (http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1090-CITICOLINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=1090&activeIngredientName=CITICOLINE)



Overview Information

Citicoline is a brain chemical that occurs naturally in the body. As a medicine, it is taken by mouth as a supplement or given by IV or as a shot.

Citicoline is used for Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, head trauma, cerebrovascular disease such as stroke, age-related memory loss, Parkinson's disease, and glaucoma.

How does it work?

Citicoline seems to increase a brain chemical called phosphatidylcholine. This brain chemical is important for brain function. Citicoline might also decrease brain tissue damage when the brain is injured.


Side effects

Citicoline seems to be safe when taken short-term (up to 90 days). The safety of long-term use is not known. Most people who take citicoline don't experience problematic side effects. But some people can have side effects such as trouble sleeping (insomnia), headache, diarrhea, low or high blood pressure, nausea, blurred vision, chest pains, and others.

Citicoline was originally developed in Japan for stroke. It was later introduced as a prescription drug in many European countries. In these countries it is now frequently prescribed for thinking problems related to circulation problems in the brain. In the US, citicoline is marketed as a dietary supplement.

This stuff is for Alzheimers, decreased memory due poor circulation secondary to chronic cardiovascular disease, stroke and stuff like that

ADHD symptoms are not caused by the same things.

bookwurm2
04-08-11, 01:22 AM
"ADHD symptoms are not caused by the same things."

Au contraire, phosphatidylcholine IS used to treat ADHD and while it may not work well for everyone it works very well for some. It works great for me--much better than any prescription medication that I've tried. (But as I've described in other threads, Natures Way Phosphatidylcholine Complex works better and L-Carnosine even more so)

Citcoline increases phophatidylcholine, so I would expect it to have some effect, at least for people who find phosphatidylcholine helpful. But just taking phosphatidylcholine might be more effective, and it's very inexpensive.

One issue with the thread title. I'm not aware of anything "homeopathic" about citicoline. Also its it's not "undiscovered."

bookwurm2
04-08-11, 01:25 AM
Below is the wikipedia article. My prediction is that it will work very well for a lucky few, have some effect for a few other lucky people and have virtually no effect for most.

"Citicoline (INN (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Nonproprietary_Name)), also known as cytidine diphosphate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytidine_diphosphate)-choline (CDP-Choline) & cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine is apsychostimulant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychostimulant)/nootropic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nootropic). It is an intermediate in the generation of phosphatidylcholine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylcholine) from choline (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choline). Sold in over 70 countries under a variety of brand names: Ceraxon, Cognizin, NeurAxon, Somazina etc.Studies suggest that CDP-choline supplements increase dopamine receptor densities,<sup id="cite_ref-0" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-0)</sup> and suggest that CDP-choline supplementation can ameliorate memory impairment caused by environmental conditions.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-1)</sup> Preliminary research has found that citicoline supplements help improve focus and mental energy and may possibly be useful in the treatment of attention deficit disorder.<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-2)</sup><sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-3)</sup> Citicoline has also been shown to elevate ACTH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ACTH) independent of CRH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRH) levels and to amplify the release of other HPA axis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HPA_axis) hormones such as LH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luteinizing_hormone), FSH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FSH), GH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growth_hormone) and TSH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSH) in response to hypothalamic releasing factors.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-4)</sup> These effects on HPA hormone levels may be beneficial for some individuals but, may have undesirable effects in those with medical conditions featuring ACTH or cortisol hypersecretion including, but not limited to, PCOS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCOS), type II diabetes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_II_diabetes) and major depressive disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_depressive_disorder).<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-5)</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference" style="line-height: 1em; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal;">[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicoline#cite_note-6)"</sup>

MichaelBluth
11-05-13, 04:36 PM
I realize this is an old thread but the slur that citicoline is "homeopathic" must not go unrefuted...

Corina86
11-05-13, 05:12 PM
I use Neuro Optimizer because my psychiatrist recommended it and it doesn't do anything yet. I will use it until I run out of pills just to be sure. It contains:

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" align="center"><tbody><tr><td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Citidina 5-difosfocolina
(citicolina, CDP colina)
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">
300mg

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Fosfatidilserina(FS)
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">100mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Acetil L-Carnitina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">L-Glutamina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Acid alfa lipoic
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">50mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Taurina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Fosfatidilcolina</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">135mg</td></tr></tbody></table>

sarahsweets
11-19-13, 05:59 AM
I'm surprised at this. I have yet to meet a psyche that recommends any supplements beyond fish oil and B vitamins.

I use Neuro Optimizer because my psychiatrist recommended it and it doesn't do anything yet. I will use it until I run out of pills just to be sure. It contains:

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" align="center"><tbody><tr><td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Citidina 5-difosfocolina
(citicolina, CDP colina)
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">
300mg

</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Fosfatidilserina(FS)
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">100mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Acetil L-Carnitina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">L-Glutamina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Acid alfa lipoic
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">50mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Taurina
</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">500mg
</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="left">Fosfatidilcolina</td> <td style="margin: 0px; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; padding: 0px;" height="1" align="right">135mg</td></tr></tbody></table>

Prazak
11-19-13, 06:37 PM
Hey Corina, How is Neuro Optimizer working out for you?

Prazak
11-19-13, 06:38 PM
Bookwurm, you haven't posted for a couple of years, but I would be very curious to hear how it is going with the L-Carnosine?

Corina86
01-31-14, 06:37 PM
Neurooptimizer doesn't do s*** for me. Neither do Omega's (though I haven't been taken the best quality ones, I have to admit that) or B-vitamins. Actually, vitamins make me so hungry that I just can't focus on anything. I do like green and black tea though. Combined with coffee and lots of cinnamon, they raise my energy levels quite well.

avjgirsijdhtjhs
01-31-14, 08:27 PM
lots of cinnamon

First off, I see that you're in Romania. Okay, so anyway, the point of the post...

Pretty much all the cinnamon in the US is cassia cinnamon, and very little is ceylon cinnamon (and if the package doesn't indicate whether it's cassia or ceylon, you can be almost 100% certain that it's cassia, since if it was ceylon, they'd use that as a selling point and note that on the package).

Cassia is high in coumarin, which is liver toxic, and it doesn't take much cassia to do damage...