View Full Version : I probably have asperger syndrome


Mohammed
03-24-11, 10:03 PM
I thought it was all adhd's fault, but it seems there's something as bad that I have, it explains a lot of things now. Can someone please tell me how Asperger syndrome is treated? I have ADHD and GAD.

daveddd
03-24-11, 10:04 PM
anti psychotics, stimulants

ginniebean
03-24-11, 10:04 PM
I'm not entirely sure there is any specific treatment... but it is possible.

Fortune
03-24-11, 10:17 PM
There isn't really a specific treatment for AS. There are a handful of therapeutic modalities to help cope with things like the anxiety that's common with many, alexithymia, and sensory processing difficulties. In general, it's more about management than anything else.

Bluerose
03-25-11, 08:07 AM
It’s important to get yourself properly diagnosed.
Self-diagnoses is not recommended.

tipoo
03-25-11, 08:30 AM
I thought it was all adhd's fault, but it seems there's something as bad that I have, it explains a lot of things now. Can someone please tell me how Asperger syndrome is treated? I have ADHD and GAD.


Go see a specialist and get an official diagnosis. There is no medical treatment if that's what you mean, but they can help you through other things.

Fortune
03-25-11, 09:30 AM
Itís important to get yourself properly diagnosed.
Self-diagnoses is not recommended.

Per Dr. Tony Attwood, a significantly high number of people who self-diagnose with AS are quite likely to have AS. There's nothing really to gain from being autistic, and plenty to lose. Given that diagnosis can be expensive and difficult to obtain for adults and especially women, and given that there is no particular treatment for being autistic, the caution seems unnecessary.

tipoo
03-25-11, 09:31 AM
Per Dr. Tony Attwood, a significantly high number of people who self-diagnose with AS are quite likely to have AS. There's nothing really to gain from being autistic, and plenty to lose. Given that diagnosis can be expensive and difficult to obtain for adults and especially women, and given that there is no particular treatment for being autistic, the caution seems unnecessary.


On the other hand it could prevent spending a lifetime thinking you have something you don't.

Fortune
03-25-11, 09:48 AM
On the other hand it could prevent spending a lifetime thinking you have something you don't.

So you think that if someone self-diagnoses with Asperger's Syndrome, that a psychiatrist or psychologist saying "No, I don't think you have it" is likely to be accurate or convincing in every case?

I know people who have a lifetime of social difficulties, sensory issues, particular kinds of cognitive processing problems, intense interests, and repetitive behavior that are fairly common among autistic people, who have been told that they can't be autistic because, oh... any number of reasons. Do you think that they just say "Oh, okay, a professional told me it couldn't be true, I'll drop it?"

Dr. Attwood - who is a professional with a lot of experience dealing with people he's diagnosed with AS - has fairly sound reasons for his statement that self-diagnosis is likely to be accurate, not the least of which is that apparently he's found that a significant number of people who have self-diagnosed turned out to have it.

As far as it's been for me, I've gone from self-diagnosed to unofficially diagnosed (my therapist pretty certainly believes it's true) to getting a referral for an official diagnosis. I am not sure whether the diagnosis would be happening at all if I hadn't done the research for self-diagnosis and mentioned the possibility to my therapist.

I'm a firm believer in client self-advocacy. Obviously things need to be treated, but I do not particularly accept the notion that clients are unable to determine if they have particular conditions and thus should not investigate the matter on their own, strictly leaving it to professionals who may be inclined to dismiss their concerns, let alone logistical difficulties in getting that diagnosis for any number of reasons.

Just to be clear, I'm not arguing against getting an official diagnosis. I am questioning the cautions against self-diagnosis.

tipoo
03-25-11, 09:56 AM
So you think that if someone self-diagnoses with Asperger's Syndrome, that a psychiatrist or psychologist saying "No, I don't think you have it" is likely to be accurate or convincing in every case?


No, I think that someone with a self-diagnosis is less likely to recognize other factors that may mimic the symptoms, ie mild depression for instance.

Fortune
03-25-11, 10:02 AM
No, I think that someone with a self-diagnosis is less likely to recognize other factors that may mimic the symptoms, ie mild depression for instance.

Mild depression doesn't mimic AS, not on more than a superficial level.

Lunacie
03-25-11, 10:03 AM
No, I think that someone with a self-diagnosis is less likely to recognize other factors that may mimic the symptoms, ie mild depression for instance.

Mild depression is nothing like AS, if that's what you're actually saying?

tipoo
03-25-11, 10:04 AM
Mild depression doesn't mimic AS, not on more than a superficial level.
Mild depression is nothing like AS, if that's what you're actually saying?


I'm not saying it does, I'm saying someone unqualified to make such a diagnosis could confuse them.

Fortune
03-25-11, 10:06 AM
I'm not saying it does, I'm saying someone unqualified to make such a diagnosis could confuse them.

Yeah, this is pretty unlikely.

tipoo
03-25-11, 10:09 AM
Yeah, this is pretty unlikely.

Based on...?

We don't know any of the OP's symptoms, what he used to self-diagnose, etc. All I'm saying is don't commit to something you aren't yet sure of.

Lunacie
03-25-11, 10:10 AM
I'm not saying it does, I'm saying someone unqualified to make such a diagnosis could confuse them.

It's true that what looks like ASD or AS could be Bipolar or Borderline Personality Disorder - but most likely it really is some form of Autism. I think the OP is asking for more information before making a decision to talk to the doctor about amending his diagnosis. What's wrong with doing that?

tipoo
03-25-11, 10:11 AM
It's true that what looks like ASD or AS could be Bipolar or Borderline Personality Disorder - but most likely it really is some form of Autism. I think the OP is asking for more information before making a decision to talk to the doctor about amending his diagnosis. What's wrong with doing that?


If that's the case, nothing is wrong. I just had the impression people were making for-certain diagnosis.

Lunacie
03-25-11, 10:13 AM
If that's the case, nothing is wrong. I just had the impression people were making for-certain diagnosis.

Different perceptions. That's not the impression I got at all.

Fortune
03-25-11, 10:14 AM
Based on...?

The fact that depression is kind of distinctive. Do you seriously believe these are easily confused? If anything, people are more likely to assume that their AS is depression than the other way around.

We don't know any of the OP's symptoms, what he used to self-diagnose, etc. All I'm saying is don't commit to something you aren't yet sure of.

I'm not talking specifically about the OP.

You have been arguing "don't self diagnose." I have been arguing against that.

Fortune
03-25-11, 10:17 AM
It's true that what looks like ASD or AS could be Bipolar or Borderline Personality Disorder - but most likely it really is some form of Autism. I think the OP is asking for more information before making a decision to talk to the doctor about amending his diagnosis. What's wrong with doing that?

Actually, I would argue that this is only true to an observer, and generally only observers likely to rule out ASDs without serious consideration. As with depression - the experience of having BPD or bipolar is distinct from being autistic. Admittedly, someone could be autistic and have BPD or bipolar or be depressed, but that is again something else.

It's far too easy to look at these things as a diagnostician would look at them and assume that the person who has them would experience them that way as well.

I agree with you about what the OP is doing, though. I was primarily arguing that blanket opposition to self-diagnosis is pointless and unhelpful.

tipoo
03-25-11, 10:21 AM
The fact that depression is kind of distinctive. Do you seriously believe these are easily confused? If anything, people are more likely to assume that their AS is depression than the other way around.

You have been arguing "don't self diagnose." I have been arguing against that.

No, I said depression for instance. It was an example.

And again no, I've been saying don't completely commit to a self diagnosis and straight up ask for treatment, a clear distinction.

I'm fully aware I could be interpreting the OP all wrong, but I just wanted to put out a word of advice in case.

Fortune
03-25-11, 10:28 AM
No, I said depression for instance. It was an example.

And again no, I've been saying don't completely commit to a self diagnosis and straight up ask for treatment, a clear distinction.

And I pointed out your example doesn't make sense. Does it being an example mean I should have just said, "Oh, okay, it's totally easy to confuse other conditions for AS?" even though this is unlikely?

I'm fully aware I could be interpreting the OP all wrong, but I just wanted to put out a word of advice in case.And I'd advise exploring the matter if it's really a concern, because getting serious medical attention for it is difficult for an adult.

Mohammed
03-25-11, 12:06 PM
Based on...?

We don't know any of the OP's symptoms, what he used to self-diagnose, etc. All I'm saying is don't commit to something you aren't yet sure of.
I have always been extremely paranoid. I used to have the worst nightmares and rarely hallucinate before and after sleep.

When I was 7 and 8 I went to a private fundamentalist school. I was very tall, I beat up every kid and cried a lot.

when I became 9 the other kids grew up and I lost my only advantage. I was bullied by everyone, including the ones I used to bully. I was beaten everyday, and I just cried. I eventually joined a karate club so I can beat them all.

at 10 I changed school and everyone was friendly again, I was able to relate to one student and befriend him, I didn't care about befriending others. Then I noticed students started to be hustle to me one by one. I started to get angry again and one day I got so mad I went to the most notorious and feared student and beat him up until his face was bleeding and he cried in front of everyone. I was surprised when everyone became very friendly to me.

at 11 I went to a public school again and this time I decided to be silent because I noticed somehow I make people bully me when I talk. If anyone attempted to bully me I would beat them up so no one else would dare.

I met my best friend who had very good social skills, he had the ability to make anyone his friend. I learned a lot of social skills from him but I still had disabilities.

from 11 to 15 I was in public schools and I enjoyed my time, had lots of friends, and rarely fought, I figured the karate that I saw on tv wasn't fake as people used to claim.

when I became 16(first high school year) I went to a private liberal school with lots of rich kids. I was nervous and was trying to understand this new environment so I can "fit in". I was stereotyped as "that bad*** kid from a public school", lots of students feared me, I didn't like it at first, but later I got used to it and felt flattered, after all, it's better than being bullied.

at 16 I started to secretly skip school for 3 months, I played soccer with other kids who skip school too, we played soccer for 6 hours a day, 5 times a week. During that time I became passionate about karate and my daily routine became 6 hours soccer, launch, 4 hours karate and 4 hours gym

at 17 I got a serious injury and couldn't walk normally for a year, I got kicked from school, and I addicted a video game called World of Warcraft(I played it 12-20 hours straight)

WoW was like a world of it's own, and it was much more better than the real world. I made lots of friends, for the first time I enjoyed team work, it was very exiting working with 24 team members to defeat the undefeatable. I played it for 2 years then it became boring.

I often eat the same food, I ate in a restaurant for 15 years and for 15 years I ordered the same sandwich. I eat in my university's cafeteria almost everyday. and I order the same sandwich. I actually wondered why I eat the same food and tried to relate it to my other problems, I attempted to order different food and see if something in me will change, but I ended up returning to that sandwich.

daveddd
03-25-11, 12:11 PM
sounds like schizotypal personality disorder:D:D:D

Lunacie
03-25-11, 12:28 PM
sounds like schizotypal personality disorder:D:D:D

I don't know anything about schitzo disorder. I can see several Autism traits in Mohammed's story.

fracturedstory
03-25-11, 08:07 PM
Self diagnosis is tolerated in the autistic community as long as you do hardcore research on it. I myself was self diagnosed, unofficially diagnosed then officially diagnosed. I've never stopped researching it too.

An official diagnosis does not do much for an adult. Unlike in ADHD there is not a medication that can lessen the symptoms so a lot of people don't see the need to get an official diagnosis. For those that are diagnosed they can get extra support in school, college or get on disability if they can't find work. They can also get accommodation housing.

Doctors can also diagnose AS based on a few symptoms they think everyone with Asperger's may have. And for those over 40 who have jobs and their own family an official diagnosis really isn't going to make much of a difference.

Mohammed
03-26-11, 07:48 AM
Self diagnosis is tolerated in the autistic community as long as you do hardcore research on it. I myself was self diagnosed, unofficially diagnosed then officially diagnosed. I've never stopped researching it too.

An official diagnosis does not do much for an adult. Unlike in ADHD there is not a medication that can lessen the symptoms so a lot of people don't see the need to get an official diagnosis. For those that are diagnosed they can get extra support in school, college or get on disability if they can't find work. They can also get accommodation housing.

Doctors can also diagnose AS based on a few symptoms they think everyone with Asperger's may have. And for those over 40 who have jobs and their own family an official diagnosis really isn't going to make much of a difference.

I remember my childhood very well, and I'm very sure I have AS because it all make sense now.